Wednesday, February 7th 2018

FSP Announces the Hydro PTM+ 1400W Liquid-cooled PSU Co-designed by Bitspower

FSP, one of the leading manufacturers of power supplies in the world is pleased to announce its newest advanced power supply, the Hydro PTM+. After its initial unveiling at Computex 2017, where it received massively positive response from hardware fans and PC gamers, the Hydro PTM+ 1200W is now ready to be built into PC gaming rigs across the globe.

The Hydro PTM+ was developed in cooperation with Bitspower to create a unique liquid cooled power supply that excels at its efficiency, power rating, and thermal performance. With liquid cooling enabled, up to 1400W of power can be delivered, but when power demand is below 50% loading the Hydro PTM+ remains passively cooled, remaining completely silent. On top of the fantastic power delivery and unique cooling solution, the Hydro PTM+ fits any gamers' needs, by also offering good looks. With ASUS Aura sync certified RGB lighting inside the unit and fully modular design with ribbon cables, the Hydro PTM+ is the first PSU that truly combines power, cooling, and aesthetics.
Limited Edition - 500 Units Only!
As a unique opportunity for liquid cooling and modding enthusiasts, FSP and Bitspower have prepared 500 limited edition units with amazing extras. The first 500 units will get high-quality FSP sleeved cables as well as a Bitspower AiO kit, including pump, radiator, and 120 mm LED Fan. The regular Hydro PTM+ and limited edition does not include coolant for those that want to integrate this solution into their custom systems.Check the limited edition Hydro PTM+ here.

High quality Japanese components, up to 1400W power
Internally, the Hydro PTM+ is made of only the best components. Feature 100% Japanese made E-caps, which provide reliable power and have a prolonged lifespan over other alternatives. The design, is based on a single 12V rail with a DC-DC module for supreme efficiency and voltage stability. This allows for the extremely high 92% efficiency rating, 80 PLUS Platinum certification, and various protection schemes such as over-current, over-voltage and over-temperature protection. When power-demand, and temperature rises, a single 135 mm FDB fan can cool the entire unit and starts spinning up at 30% load. Enabling liquid cooling allows the Hydro PTM+ to deliver an additional 200W, up to 1400W and the fan to remain inactive up to 50% system load.

Product Highlights
  • Up to 1400W (with liquid cooling)
  • Hybrid liquid, passive, and fan cooling
  • RGB lighting with ASUS Aura sync
  • World's first 80 PLUS Platinum Certified liquid cooled PSU
  • DC - DC module design for 92% Efficiency
  • 100% Japanese made electronic capacitors
  • Fully modular design, with ribbon cables
  • First 500 units come with FSP sleeving cable and Bitspower AIO parts
  • MSRP: USD $699.99
For more information, visit the product page.
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14 Comments on FSP Announces the Hydro PTM+ 1400W Liquid-cooled PSU Co-designed by Bitspower

#1
natr0n
A failure would be catastrophic.
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#2
GAR
"natr0n said:
A failure would be catastrophic.
lol I was thinking the same thing
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#3
CheapMeat
"natr0n said:
A failure would be catastrophic.
No, probably not. It has a fan. The liquid cooling is just added efficiency to lower noise for a range of load profiles. If orientated in a typical case, the liquid section sits at the bottom of the PSU, at the bottom of a case. Water is actually NOT conductive. It's the stuff in it that makes it conductive. If you use pure distilled water, it would not somehow explode if leaked. It probably has a safety measure to turn off if it does leak. I doubt they'd put out such a big fire hazard with absolutely faulty configuration so they could be sued.
Posted on Reply
#4
lZKoce
I am pretty sure the sole reason to release this is to write : "The only liquid cooled PSU in the world!" . Teambuilding exercise for the guys. I can relate to that :D
Posted on Reply
#6
R-T-B
"ZoneDymo said:
holy hell that price
Yeah, if we're talking that kind of money I'd much rather have that weird Cooler Master MIJ (Made in Japan) thing that OklahomaWolf @ JonnyGuru was so enamored with. This? Just an expensive gimmick.

Also, I think I'd never spend that much, so feel free to ignore this.
Posted on Reply
#7
IceScreamer
"CheapMeat said:
No, probably not. It has a fan. The liquid cooling is just added efficiency to lower noise for a range of load profiles. If orientated in a typical case, the liquid section sits at the bottom of the PSU, at the bottom of a case. Water is actually NOT conductive. It's the stuff in it that makes it conductive. If you use pure distilled water, it would not somehow explode if leaked. It probably has a safety measure to turn off if it does leak. I doubt they'd put out such a big fire hazard with absolutely faulty configuration so they could be sued.
Now you got me thinking. Would it be possible to make a PSU completely submerged in non electrically conductive fluid, that ideally has good thermal conductivity?
Posted on Reply
#8
lZKoce
"IceScreamer said:
Now you got me thinking. Would it be possible to make a PSU completely submerged in non electrically conductive fluid, that ideally has good thermal conductivity?
I think the box is too small for the mineral oil to absorb enough heat. I mean, it works for RAM, but PSU I don't think so. All mineral oil PCs I have seen eventually add a radiator grill with fans on it to be able to handle the constant heat output - if PC works 24/7. I am thinking if no radiator, then a box sized 150x150x85 won't contain enough oil to cool fast enough.
Posted on Reply
#9
IceScreamer
"lZKoce said:
I think the box is too small for the mineral oil to absorb enough heat. I mean, it works for RAM, but PSU I don't think so. All mineral oil PCs I have seen eventually add a radiator grill with fans on it to be able to handle the constant heat output - if PC works 24/7. I am thinking if no radiator, then a box sized 150x150x85 won't contain enough oil to cool fast enough.
Yea I figured there was a restriction, tho it would be fun to try at least on lower wattage PSUs, even though that makes no sense.
Posted on Reply
#11
Valantar
"IceScreamer said:
Yea I figured there was a restriction, tho it would be fun to try at least on lower wattage PSUs, even though that makes no sense.
Mineral oil won't work (as it essentially doesn't dissipate heat at all, only absorbs it), but a phase-change liquid like 3M Novec (an example: <div class="youtube-embed" data-id="CIbnl3Pj15w"><img src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/CIbnl3Pj15w/hqdefault.jpg" /><div class="youtube-play"></div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIbnl3Pj15w" target="_blank" class="youtube-title"></a></div>) that evaporates at a useful temperature, creating a closed-off heat exchange system with some sort of finned enclosure dissipating the heat and causing the liquid to condense - that might very well work. A 600W PSU (sufficient for any single- and most dual-GPU builds today) with 90% efficiency at 100% load generates 60W of waste heat in the worst-case scenario. Considering liquids like this have been shown to cool bare-IHS 90+W CPUs, that should be doable given sufficient surface area or other means of getting the heat out of there.
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#12
Casecutter
Lost me a at Ribbon cables! Now not against them for most PSU's but on this I think l'd rather have regular proper UL insulated wire.
Posted on Reply
#13
skates
Good god. Will they be coming out with a wireless version?
Posted on Reply
#14
CheapMeat
"IceScreamer said:
Now you got me thinking. Would it be possible to make a PSU completely submerged in non electrically conductive fluid, that ideally has good thermal conductivity?
I think so. I've seen it with mineral oil. I think the liquid from 3M (I forget the name) also works. I'm not sure if pure water would work as well since it's really easy to get contaminated.

*Derp, [USER=171585]Valantar[/USER] posted the 3M liquid name.

Example:
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