Thursday, February 15th 2018

NVIDIA Turing is a Crypto-mining Chip Jen-Hsun Huang Made to Save PC Gaming

When Reuters reported Turing as NVIDIA's next gaming graphics card, we knew something was off about it. Something like that would break many of NVIDIA's naming conventions. It now turns out that Turing, named after British scientist Alan Turing, who is credited with leading a team of mathematicians that broke the Nazi "Enigma" cryptography, is a crypto-mining and blockchain compute accelerator. It is being designed to be compact, efficient, and ready for large-scale deployment by amateur miners and crypto-mining firms alike, in a quasi-industrial scale.

NVIDIA Turing could be manufactured at a low-enough cost against GeForce-branded products, and in high-enough scales, to help bring down their prices, and save the PC gaming ecosystem. It could have an ASIC-like disruptive impact on the graphics card market, which could make mining with graphics cards less viable, in turn, lowering graphics card prices. With performance-segment and high-end graphics cards seeing 200-400% price inflation in the wake of crypto-currency mining wave, PC gaming is threatened as gamers are lured to the still-affordable new-generation console ecosystems, led by premium consoles such as the PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X. There's no word on which GPU architecture Turing will be based on ("Pascal" or "Volta"). NVIDIA is expected to launch its entire family of next-generation GeForce GTX 2000-series "Volta" graphics cards in 2018.
Source: DigitalTrends
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124 Comments on NVIDIA Turing is a Crypto-mining Chip Jen-Hsun Huang Made to Save PC Gaming

#1
jabbadap
cadaveca said:
I only have one question... what fab line is going to make these chips so that they actually have an impact on supply? Fab time is a limited resource.
Maybe the fab line which does not make gpus in the first place, like TSMCs 12nm FFC or GF 12nm FDX. I would be more concerned about graphics memory shortages, than fab lines though.
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#2
RealNeil
evernessince said:
I'm looking for release dates.
They're kicking around a March release date. (not set in stone yet)
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#3
RejZoR
It's hilarious how everyone is concerned over landfills getting filled with unused crypto cards, but no one has an issue with burning of terawatts of power to calculate meaningless numbers to make money. Which is essentially what cryptocurrency is.
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#4
Captain_Tom
So if Nvidia wanted to, they could take V100 and:

1) Cut the amount of HBM down to 6GB, but clock it faster.
2) Remove the tensor cores and manufacture these cards on 16nm (instead of the more expensive 12nm).
3) Use a smaller core, but clock it faster; and then turn the fan up to 70% to mitigate the extra heat.

^ With these tweaks they could probably make the thing do ~80-100 MH/s ETH @200-250w out of the box. With those numbers they could easily charge $1500. I could also see a cut-down 50 MH/s @200w GDDR6 variant sold for $600.


However I am very skeptical about how much effort Nvidia will actually put into making these cards truly worth it. After all, everything I just stated was in reference to mining Ethereum; but there are SO many other cryptocurrencies that these cards would not be as good as the price would suggest they should be. Let us not forget that Vega 64 beats V100 at both Monero mining, and relative dual-mining capabilities while utilizing half the die size and a smaller bus...

What would truly be remarkable is if Nvidia managed to make Turing substantially more efficient at ETHash, ETHash dual mining, Equihash, cryptonight, X17, and basically any emerging mining algorithms they think are on the horizon. And then they also included 1 x HDMI 2.1, and 1 x Displayport 1.4 in case someone eventually does want to use one of these cards for gaming.
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#5
Fluffmeister
RejZoR said:
It's hilarious how everyone is concerned over landfills getting filled with unused crypto cards, but no one has an issue with burning of terawatts of power to calculate meaningless numbers to make money. Which is essentially what cryptocurrency is.
I did laugh too, Nv have announced nothing yet and it's already in landfill causing environmental damage!
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#6
kruk
RejZoR said:
It's hilarious how everyone is concerned over landfills getting filled with unused crypto cards, but no one has an issue with burning of terawatts of power to calculate meaningless numbers to make money. Which is essentially what cryptocurrency is.
And people burn terawatts of power to calculate meaningless pixels to play games ... At least gaming cards can be reused for years (I still use a 15 years old Geforce 6000 series card) which won't be the case for mining only cards.

Landfills in poor countries might seem a joke to you (and others), but those who daily inhale the toxic fumes coming from them aren't laughing ...
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#7
Casecutter
Franzen4Real said:
(as in, the more people buy these cards> the more people will mine> the more difficult mining gets> the less return/value/reason there is to mining>the less people will buy the cards).
It is a strange scheme that only those who got in at the top make money. ▲ Well until it's taken by a hacker(s) that seems to be the better side of the equation to get in on.

RejZoR said:
It's hilarious how everyone is concerned over landfills getting filled with unused crypto cards, but no one has an issue with burning of terawatts of power to calculate meaningless numbers to make money. Which is essentially what cryptocurrency is.
It is the whole eco-system energy to design, produce wafers, create them into boards, packaging, ships/trucks to move them, then energy to run them to do what actual work! (at least Folding did help do something). At least most GPU's that don't fail at least go on to a second even third use-life before retired. Such crypo-only-cards are fairly useless the moment the hash/watt equation moves and they're no longer profitable.

There are always folk who can't discuss the ramification of an action until too late.
Bullets fly, and it's to soon to talk about... time passes and why are you talking about that, no ones got time for that anymore! As human we gotten into weird mentality of apathy or playing into others diversion tactics. (or both)
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#8
Fluffmeister
Bullets flying and a lack of apathy seems apt... or maybe not, hey ho.
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#9
efikkan
If true, this has got to be one of the most useless pieces of technology in a long time. Mining of cryptocurrency is only computational demanding to regulate the generation of new currency. Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have a fixed of currency generation and a cap on total volume, so advancing mining hardware is nearly pointless. This workload is just wasted power, it's not like it contributes to anything useful. Bitcoin mining already consumes energy comparable to a country like Ireland, all of it completely unnecessarily.
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#10
Xzibit
qubit said:
@btarunr Do you have a source link for this Turing development?
Its speculation which a lot of the tech sites are doing now a days for whatever reason.

Digital Trends - Nvidia may reveal dedicated ‘Turing’ cryptocurrency mining cards in March

Digital Trends
Nvidia is expected to introduce new graphics cards for the gaming market said:
Everything going forward most likely is still Volta. But the Ampere and Turing code names may be used to describe cards for two different markets given the new landscape: Gaming and cryptocurrency mining. Previous rumors pointed to Ampere code-named gaming cards while Turing likely references to cryptocurrency mining cards. Those names may be reversed too, but highly unlikely.
Its always beneficial to read the links/sources themselves in their entirety.

dicktracy said:
This is just speculation from Digital Trend
Pretty much now slap a sensationalize Headline to get traffic for your website.
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#11
theoneandonlymrk
Can't see it happening like this , no cited source , and regardless not enough memory to go round so the big rescue if it existed isn't going to work.

So

A. It's all balls

B. It's Spesh and a stupid idea given the market would be awash with mint ish seconds for months

C. Same old shit repackaged , tweaked a bit with a price hike.

I know which one it definitely isn't B.
Posted on Reply
#12
Sandbo
I am not saying this is a good practice (in fact really bad),
Nvidia might just disable the support on CUDA/GPGPU on their gaming cards, which will probably solve the problem.....
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#13
Vya Domus
Sandbo said:

Nvidia might just disable the support on CUDA/GPGPU on their gaming cards
Can't be done.
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#14
lexluthermiester
Vya Domus said:
Can't be done.
Oh, don't kid yourself. It can be done in the official drivers.
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#15
Casecutter
Fluffmeister said:
Bullets flying and a lack of apathy seems apt... or maybe not, hey ho.
I think the word you wanted was "Empathy" as in; you seem to lack any...
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#16
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
I just want to see how this plays out.

If it works Great, if not, no one is getting a hold of my 290 VaporX lol
Posted on Reply
#17
kuwlness
Called this one to a T on Tuesday. Booyah!! We miners gonna keep on mining! Haters keep on hating.

"This card should be an exceptional crypto miner. They're obviously going after AMD/Radeon with this one since Radeon cards are great for mining Ethereum and nVidia has always lagged here. Ethereum is a "Turing" Complete blockchain."
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#18
Vya Domus
lexluthermiester said:
Oh, don't kid yourself. It can be done in the official drivers.
While PTX , Nvidia's high-level assembly language for CUDA, is closed source and controlled through the driver the actual shader assembly generated by it is available to anyone. Meaning that "disabling CUDA" would be absolutely useless. It's like saying that without Intel's closed compiler you can never write a program for their microarchitecture again , clearly not true.

Therfore , it can't be done. No question about it.
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#19
Fluffmeister
Casecutter said:
I think the word you wanted was "Empathy" as in; you seem to lack any...
No definitely apathy, as it doesn't concern me (or those in power). But after Sandy it's hard to have any empathy...
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#20
theoneandonlymrk
Even disabling Cuda wouldn't stop it ,direct compute, open CL/GL still exists essentially the algorithms are similar to some parts of game code soo ,yeh turn it off for consumers and see physx as what??
Posted on Reply
#21
Fluffmeister
So basically what you are all saying is... what ever Nvidia release will sell like hot cakes and make them loads of money?
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#22
theoneandonlymrk
Fluffmeister said:
So basically what you are all saying is... what ever Nvidia release will sell like hot cakes and make them loads of money?
The law , and they normally abide.
Posted on Reply
#23
Fluffmeister
theoneandonlymrk said:
The law , and they normally abide.
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#24
lexluthermiester
Vya Domus said:
While PTX , Nvidia's high-level assembly language for CUDA, is closed source and controlled through the driver the actual shader assembly generated by it is available to anyone. Meaning that "disabling CUDA" would be absolutely useless. It's like saying that without Intel's closed compiler you can never write a program for their micro-architecture again , clearly not true. Therfore , it can't be done. No question about it.
You seem to have misunderstood. If Nvidia wants to lock such out of their driver, they can do so. Can the community come up with an alternative? Sure. And I think that's already been done.
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#25
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Jen-Hsun Huang made it with his own bare hands, with magic, using rarefied silicon, to save the glorious PC master gaming race.
The Price: Your left kidney.
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