Tuesday, March 20th 2018

Intel's 8-core Mainstream Coffee Lake-S Processor Spotted in the Wild?

A screenshot of what seems to be a higher core-count CPU from Intel has been doing the rounds, brought to us by the usual suspects. This supposedly marks the first appearance of Intel's new Coffee Lake-S processors, which should feature increased core-counts - gearing them towards stealing some of AMD's initiative. If you'll remember, the red team regained it in explosive fashion with their first generation Ryzen CPUs - and AMD is looking to double down on with the launch of their updated, 12 nm refresh Ryzen 2000 series just next month.

The new CPUs should be delivered alongside a new platform, Z390 - at the moment, a mirage that's been referenced here and there, but still has no concrete evidence towards its existence. However, it's expected that Z390 as a platform will be what Intel's Z370 was supposed to be from the very beginning - but never could. The idea that's been circulating, and which has some credit (though it should still be taken with a salty disposition), is that due to Intel's need to rush Coffee Lake out the door - so as not to compete against AMD's 8-core Zen-based CPUs with their usual cadre of 4-core, 8-thread processors - led the company to rush out the Z370 release. The idea for Z370 was simply for it to deliver, at all points in the minimum requirements, the correct power delivery hardware and mechanisms for the increased power draw that comes with the added cores. But it was, as such, absent of any real improvements - it can be interpreted, basically, as a re-branded Z270 chipset platform - and there's something to that claim, definitely. Thus Z390 will be the actual, originally planned platform for Intel's Coffee Lake CPUs, with all features - however fair that is for buyers of Intel's Z370.
That introduction serves as a context-necessary entry point for the title of this story, though - Intel's upcoming 8-core mainstream CPUs. The screenshot in question shows a genuine Intel 8-core CPU running at 2.2 GHz base clocks (remember, this isn't released, final silicon, so that's always up for a change). There are some clear errors in reading the CPU's identity - not at all uncommon at this stage of the process. The readouts of 0 nm and 0 W power, while amazingly interesting in a "what if" scenario, don't ring out true just yet. The testing platform is recognized as Intel Corporation Coffee Lake S82 UDIMM RVP - whose identification scheme is consistent with Intel engineering boards. We're here, as always, to wait and see how this all pans out - both hardware and consumer-wise. Source: Videocardz
Add your own comment

33 Comments on Intel's 8-core Mainstream Coffee Lake-S Processor Spotted in the Wild?

#1
_JP_
Competition working as designed.
Posted on Reply
#2
theoneandonlymrk
_JP_ said:
Competition working as designed.
Good to see it too eh.
I do love the slide though ,the truth obfuscated by making the right square smaller , instead of the left.

Now that's Pr.
Posted on Reply
#4
ensabrenoir
....what will the hedt processors have left to offer?
Posted on Reply
#5
R-T-B
ensabrenoir said:
....what will the hedt processors have left to offer?
Moar cores?
Posted on Reply
#6
Imsochobo
ensabrenoir said:
....what will the hedt processors have left to offer?
Intel Core I9:
PCI Lanes.
even more cores.
Quadchannel memory


Threadripper:
even more pci-e lanes than xeon\I9
ECC Memory support (Ryzen 1xxx support it unofficially but same memory controller as epyc)
even more cores
Quadchannel memory
Posted on Reply
#7
Hood
0nm manufacturing process? 2 208 stock clock and 2 208 turbo clock? We already knew it would have 8 physical/16 logical cores, and Z390 chipset, months ago (Nov. 2017). There is no new information here, just a friendly reminder of what's coming (we still don't know when). Thanks anyway for this, Mr Raevenlord, I like to hear any news related to the ongoing rivalry/drama between red and blue. Hopefully the next news flash will tell us what the clocks will be set at, or maybe a faster stock RAM speed.
Posted on Reply
#8
Vario
Will we see an 8 core i5?
Posted on Reply
#9
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Vario said:
Will we see an 8 core i5?
Maybe in another 5 years. i3s just made it to quad core status so dont sh!t on their parade just yet.

My i7 has been relegated to an i5 chip of sorts
Posted on Reply
#10
Hood
FreedomEclipse said:
Maybe in another 5 years. i3s just made it to quad core status so dont sh!t on their parade just yet.

My i7 has been relegated to an i5 chip of sorts
Not really - you have 12 logical cores, which no i5 has (yet). 4.5 GHz isn't that bad, either. You're still good for a couple of years, anyway.
Posted on Reply
#11
T4C Fantasy
CPU & GPU DB Maintainer
FreedomEclipse said:
Maybe in another 5 years. i3s just made it to quad core status so dont sh!t on their parade just yet.

My i7 has been relegated to an i5 chip of sorts
tests show that 6 cores 6 threads beats 4 cores 8 threads in every test even thread intensive ones, isnt that crazy? i wish i could site the source but a tpu member did it here and proved that the real cores beat out the threads needed on lesser cores.

aka: i5 8600K crushes a i7 6700K <-- cpu i have
Posted on Reply
#12
Patriot
T4C Fantasy said:
tests show that 6 cores 6 threads beats 4 cores 8 threads in every test even thread intensive ones, isnt that crazy? i wish i could site the source but a tpu member did it here and proved that the real cores beat out the threads needed on lesser cores.

aka: i5 8600K crushes a i7 6700K <-- cpu i have
That's not crazy it's basic logic...hyperthreads boost multi-threaded results over just cores by <20% typically.
Posted on Reply
#13
Chaitanya
Imsochobo said:
Intel Core I9:
PCI Lanes.
even more cores.
Quadchannel memory


Threadripper:
even more pci-e lanes than xeon\I9
ECC Memory support (Ryzen 1xxx support it unofficially but same memory controller as epyc)
even more cores
Quadchannel memory
Unless customer is willing to spend more than 1000$ there are very little benefits to going for Intel's castrated HEDT platform. For majority of consumer applications Quad channel memory is hardly useful. Also dont forget you need to spend 100$ or so if you want to do a NVME RAID which is even worse restriction than having limited PCI-E lanes on sub $1000 CPUs.
Posted on Reply
#16
las
Intel is in panic mode, lol

But it's just more Skylake garbage, we need Ice Lake and we need it fast -> 10nm, new arch, spectre/meltdown proof and hopefully not pigeon poop as TIM
Posted on Reply
#17
Patriot
Prima.Vera said:
2.2Ghz? What's this, a 32 Core CPU??
No, it's an early ES, they often run at super low clocks, helps prevent theft and resale and ensures stability.
Posted on Reply
#18
bug
0 nm fab process - for the ultimate in die-space savings
0 W TDP - for the ultimate energy efficiency

/kidding
Posted on Reply
#19
Chloe Price
Hood said:
0nm manufacturing process? 2 208 stock clock and 2 208 turbo clock? We already knew it would have 8 physical/16 logical cores, and Z390 chipset, months ago (Nov. 2017). There is no new information here, just a friendly reminder of what's coming (we still don't know when). Thanks anyway for this, Mr Raevenlord, I like to hear any news related to the ongoing rivalry/drama between red and blue. Hopefully the next news flash will tell us what the clocks will be set at, or maybe a faster stock RAM speed.
Engineering Sample..? And I guess that softwares doesn't recognize these yet.
Posted on Reply
#20
jabbadap
T4C Fantasy said:
tests show that 6 cores 6 threads beats 4 cores 8 threads in every test even thread intensive ones, isnt that crazy? i wish i could site the source but a tpu member did it here and proved that the real cores beat out the threads needed on lesser cores.

aka: i5 8600K crushes a i7 6700K <-- cpu i have
Only test that I know it won't beat that is Crysis 3: when one is watching to large areas. But yeah 6 physical cores > 4 cores and 8 threads. Some games might even work better with 4 cores enabled and hyperthreading disabled.
Posted on Reply
#21
las
8600K does not crush 6700K at all. They are pretty even. Depends on workload/game. In most games 6700K/7700K/8600K/8700K performs almost identical at same clocks.
Posted on Reply
#22
T4C Fantasy
CPU & GPU DB Maintainer
las said:
8600K does not crush 6700K at all. They are pretty even. Depends on workload/game. In most games 6700K/7700K/8600K/8700K performs almost identical at same clocks.
It definetly crushes 6700k same clocks

15 to 20% faster and 29% cheaper than a 6700k 7700k
Posted on Reply
#23
Fleurious
las said:
Intel is in panic mode, lol

But it's just more Skylake garbage, we need Ice Lake and we need it fast -> 10nm, new arch, spectre/meltdown proof and hopefully not pigeon poop as TIM
I’m sure Intel has test and validated that pigeon poop for the use cases of their processors :p.
Posted on Reply
#24
las
Fleurious said:
I’m sure Intel has test and validated that pigeon poop for the use cases of their processors :p.
Throttling is happening even on stock CPU's. K models are "OC versions" after all. Altho delid is needed to OC properly. Most of them can't even hit 5 GHz stable without throttling. Intel sent out review samples that overclocked better than average and even these hits 90C+ at 5 GHz using 240-360mm AIOs.

T4C Fantasy said:
It definetly crushes 6700k same clocks

15 to 20% faster and 29% cheaper than a 6700k 7700k
No it does not. Haha. Especially not in games. It's the exact same arch with 2 more cores and no HT.

At stock 7700K beats 8700K in many games too (higher boost/clocks on the quad). Most games are still 2-4C. Very few can use more than 4C and those who can, can use HT for same perf. BF1 is a prime example. 6700K has higher minimums than 8600K. The 6 cores are maxed out. No HT to help.

Look back and see how silly 6600K/7600K does in games. It's only a matter of time before 8600K will fall short.
Posted on Reply
#25
bug
las said:
Throttling is happening even on stock CPU's. K models are "OC versions" after all. Altho delid is needed to OC properly. Most of them can't even hit 5 GHz stable without throttling. Intel sent out review samples that overclocked better than average and even these hits 90C+ at 5 GHz using 240-360mm AIOs.
That's not what testing has found out. HardOCP has tried delidding and they got like 100MHz more. To me, that's proof the stock solution is more than adequate.
And no, they don't throttle by default. They may not sustain boost clocks indefinitely, but they will sustain the advertised base clocks.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment