Friday, June 22nd 2018

HDR10+ Licensing Begins, Royalty-Free Alternative to Dolby Vision

HDR10+ Technologies, LLC announced the start of the new licensing and logo certification program for HDR10+ technology. HDR10+ is the royalty-free, open standard dynamic metadata platform for High Dynamic Range (HDR), which optimizes picture quality for 4K Ultra HD displays and improves the viewing experience for all audiences.

The new HDR10+ technology optimizes picture quality for 4K Ultra HD displays by using dynamic tone mapping to reflect frame to frame or scene to scene variations in brightness, color saturation, and contrast. The resulting enhanced viewing experience can now be easily provided on a wide range of displays bringing the viewing experience much closer to the original creative intent for the content.
The HDR10+ license and logo certification is available to interested companies that meet HDR10+ technical and testing specifications. The HDR10+ certification program qualifies the compliance based on different device categories and their technical performance to ensure that HDR10+ compliant products meet high standards for picture quality.

Consumers will be able to look for the HDR10+ logo which signifies a product's certification. The royalty-free adoption of HDR10+ for content production, distribution and consumption has already gained momentum with over 40 supporting companies.

"The new HDR10+ licensing and certification program represents a technological step forward for next generation displays," said Danny Kaye, Executive Vice President of 20th Century Fox and Managing Director of the Fox Innovation Lab. "HDR10+ improves the viewing experience for all audiences by delivering higher picture quality to a wider range of affordable TVs and devices."

"We believe that this licensing and certification program will provide reassurance to consumers who want to ensure that they are seeing the most accurate HDR representation of the creator's vision," said Toshiharu Tsutsui, Director of Panasonic's TV Business Division.

"With an increase in demand for larger displays and premium picture quality, we are thrilled to announce a new HDR10+ licensing and certification program," said Bill Mandel, Vice President of Industry Relations at Samsung Research America. "This program was designed with consumers in mind, highlighting our commitment to improving the overall HDR experience while simultaneously extending the HDR10+ ecosystem globally."

The HDR10+ platform was also designed to allow for future development and innovation in order to deliver a more powerful technology in the years to come.
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17 Comments on HDR10+ Licensing Begins, Royalty-Free Alternative to Dolby Vision

#1
lynx29
I never new Fox was behind HDR10 and now HDR10+. Hmm, interesting. I always assumed Fox was a for profit model on everything they get their hands on. Surprised Dolby Vision has not offered itself up free yet, it has to know it is far behind in terms of support and actual people that will be using it.

I just want a HDR600 certified 144hz 27" Micro or Mini LED 2560x1440p for $799 shipped, and I am set for a solid 5-10 years.
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#2
Vayra86
"Here have some HDR10++++ with your TN, 600:1 1440p fake 4K display, for the enhanced viewing experience'

For the customer :roll:
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#3
Nehemoth
Does anyone knows the technical specifications which are need it to get the HDR10+ certification?
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#4
lynx29
Vayra86
"Here have some HDR10++++ with your TN, 600:1 1440p fake 4K display, for the enhanced viewing experience'

For the customer :roll:
Now now mate, no need to be cynical yet. There is some healthy competition in the monitor/panel market at the moment... though... actually now that I think about it, doesn't AOU Optronics produce all gaming panels outside of Samsung panels?
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#5
the54thvoid
Dolby Vision was the superior HDR version at release a couple of years ago. It uses frame by frame, specific contrast. HDR10 applied a general template to the entire piece. So DV was ahead of itself.
Now, if HDR+ is offering the same it does take away some of DV's USP.
My LG set offers both but I doubt it'll be suitable for a firmware update to HDR10+.
Posted on Reply
#6
Nehemoth
the54thvoid
Dolby Vision was the superior HDR version at release a couple of years ago. It uses frame by frame, specific contrast. HDR10 applied a general template to the entire piece. So DV was ahead of itself.
Now, if HDR+ is offering the same it does take away some of DV's USP.
My LG set offers both but I doubt it'll be suitable for a firmware update to HDR10+.
Dolby Vision still is superior as it support 12 b8t depth panels.

I don't know if there's a lot of difference between 10 bits and 12 bits panels but still, Dolby has the edge
Posted on Reply
#7
Vayra86
lynx29
Now now mate, no need to be cynical yet. There is some healthy competition in the monitor/panel market at the moment... though... actually now that I think about it, doesn't AOU Optronics produce all gaming panels outside of Samsung panels?
Competition you say? I call it a race to the bottom, with the illusion of it being awesome. Real HDR capable panels (that are also pleasant to look at, mind you) are rare unicorns - still. And HDR10 doesn't help improving that one bit, on the contrary.
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#8
lynx29
Vayra86
Competition you say? I call it a race to the bottom, with the illusion of it being awesome. Real HDR capable panels (that are also pleasant to look at, mind you) are rare unicorns - still. And HDR10 doesn't help improving that one bit, on the contrary.
I'm still hoping LG will shock everyone, since smartphone sales are declining year after year, and the gimmicks of smartphones are starting to wane, LG's new 7 billion dollar OLED factory just randomly surprises end of this year with some gaming OLED monitors and special gaming features to make sure no burn in issues, or they just use all white LED's for the OLED with a filter, or something. who knows, anyways you never know :)
Posted on Reply
#9
las
Nehemoth
Dolby Vision still is superior as it support 12 b8t depth panels.

I don't know if there's a lot of difference between 10 bits and 12 bits panels but still, Dolby has the edge
There's no 12 bit consumer panels and there is zero 12 bit content.

HDR10+ will be the standard. Proprietary tech and hardware/chip requirement is not the way to do this.
Posted on Reply
#10
Nehemoth
las
There's no 12 bit consumer panels and there is zero 12 bit content.

HDR10+ will be the standard. Proprietary tech and hardware/chip requirement is not the way to do this.
Good to know, I was under the impression that the LG Wallpaper series [from 2017 and onward] were 12 bits panels
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#11
Mistral
No offence to "HDR10+ Technologies, LLC", but that logo sucks...
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#12
las
Nehemoth
Good to know, I was under the impression that the LG Wallpaper series [from 2017 and onward] were 12 bits panels
Nope all LG OLED panels are 10 bit, got a 2017 model myself. And it kinda sucks that HDR10+ probably never will be supported. More and more go the HDR10+ route because it's free and an open standard.

If Dolby wants DV to gain momentum again, they'll need to lower royalty and chip cost, but they use the money to pay studios to use DV over HDR10+ for example. Tbh it's pretty stupid...
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#13
mtcn77
Dolby doesn't require 12-bit panels? Get your facts in order, the panels are 10-bit.
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#14
TheMailMan78
Big Member
I have a 60" Dolby Vision 4k. Reds seem to have issues but the contrast is great.
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#15
mtcn77
TheMailMan78
I have a 60" Dolby Vision 4k. Reds seem to have issues but the contrast is great.
It is super hard to reach the same contrast using saturation as a guide against static luminance tones. The displaysets need an ambiance light sensor and very precise pointer tables & calibration to get it right, imo.
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#16
TheMailMan78
Big Member
mtcn77
It is super hard to reach the same contrast using saturation as a guide against static luminance tones. The displaysets need an ambiance light sensor and very precise pointer tables & calibration to get it right, imo.
Well it took a damn Spyder4 to get it close to right. The mids just are not there on this set but its not bad.
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#17
mtcn77
TheMailMan78
Well it took a damn Spyder4 to get it close to right. The mids just are not there on this set but its not bad.
I'm guessing it needs a dual processing setup in the driver. One based on ambient lighting versus saturation, the other classic tone mapping; however for contrast peaking reasons I'm guessing it will be, polynomially, not as simple as that.
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