Thursday, July 12th 2018

Intel Announces New Generation Xeon E Processor Family

Intel today announced the release of the new Intel Xeon E-2100 processor. The Intel Xeon E processor, successor to the Intel Xeon E3 processor, is designed for entry-level workstations that provide creators with powerful, single-threaded application performance with a platform optimized for reliability and affordability.

"With today's workloads, aging workstations impede productivity, collaboration and creativity. The release of the Intel Xeon E processor is intended to deliver the essential performance and visuals for entry workstations, as well as optimizing the innovative form factors, designs and diverse requirements of our customers," said Jennifer Huffstetler, vice president and general manager, data center product management, Intel Corporation.
The new Intel Xeon E processor delivers a powerful combination of performance and capabilities for entry-level workstations. They are architected and crafted for the demands of creative professionals. Compared with its predecessor, the new processor offers higher max turbo frequency, faster DRAM speeds, enhanced I/O, and advanced security and reliability features. These processors are available with Intel UHD graphics supported by a broad set of workstation application.

The Intel Xeon E-2100 processor is a 6-core processor targeted at entry-level workstations. The combination of two additional cores and higher single-core turbo frequency delivers increases in performance across workstation benchmarks as compared with previous 4-core entry workstation processors. The processor offers Error Correcting Code (ECC) memory, a key feature to maximize data integrity, to help improve system stability and to reduce the possibility of silent data corruption.

Workstations powered by Intel Xeon processors meet the highly diversified demands of creative professionals in fields such as architecture, engineering, media and entertainment, and financial services. The Intel Xeon E processor is the latest addition to Intel's portfolio of workstation-optimized processors, which also includes Intel Xeon Scalable processors (delivering breakthrough dual-socket performance for the most advanced workstation professionals), and Intel Xeon W processors (targeting mainstream workstations with a combination of performance, enhanced memory capabilities, and hardware-enhanced security and reliability features).

Features:
  • Up to 6 cores and 12 threads
  • Up to 4.70 GHz using Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0
  • Up to 64 GB DDR4 ECC 2666 MHz
  • Available with Intel UHD Graphics 630 supporting 4K UHD with built-in HEVC 10-bit hardware acceleration delivers enhanced 4K media decoding and encoding
  • Up to 40 lanes of PCIe for graphics, storage and network expandability
  • Support for USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt technology
  • Support for Intel Optane memory for a faster, smoother and amazingly responsive computing experience
  • Advanced hardware-enhanced security with Intel vPro technology and enhanced Intel Software Guard Extensions Support for Intel Ethernet and Intel Wireless-AC networking
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29 Comments on Intel Announces New Generation Xeon E Processor Family

#1
Durvelle27
Will it cost a kidney or two testies
Posted on Reply
#2
Fx
Durvelle27 said:
Will it cost a kidney or two testies
These shouldn't be too bad (<$400 estimation) since they are the successor to the E3 series. The E5 and E7 series is where price got stupid. Not just workstations, these make for great home servers running FreeNAS or ESXI. They didn't provide base frequencies, but they are typically high due to fewer cores. I noticed this is a jump to six core (thank you AMD) so that is welcome.
Posted on Reply
#3
altcapwn
I don't know about Xeon anymore.

For servers it's okay, but I'm buying i7 since long ago for workstations. And if Dell would sell AMD cpus, I would be f*cking happy.
Posted on Reply
#4
Fx
altcapwn said:
I don't know about Xeon anymore.

For servers it's okay, but I'm buying i7 since long ago for workstations. And if Dell would sell AMD cpus, I would be f*cking happy.
The main reason that I buy Xeon is because it has better support in server platforms and also provides ECC capability for the servers I build. i7's and i5's do not support ECC :banghead:
Posted on Reply
#5
Xx Tek Tip xX
Forget this xeon - I'd love to see how this compares to my x5650 at 4.4ghz and intel charge a premium on xeons for the fact is has ECC support for servers
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#6
Octopuss
So what is the point of this? PCIe lanes?
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#7
Ravenmaster
Still waiting for a successor to X299
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#8
Vya Domus
I don't quite get these product , where exactly do they fit in ?
Posted on Reply
#9
Fx
Vya Domus said:
I don't quite get these product , where exactly do they fit in ?
Prosumer's servers, SMB servers, any business that can economically justify them for workstations.

With that said, when I think of the E3 lineup, I never think of workstation. These processors are little beasts. Of course, I always buy the higher frequencies of >3.6GHz.
Posted on Reply
#10
Cybrnook2002
Fx said:
Prosumer's servers, SMB servers, any business that can economically justify them for workstations.

With that said, when I think of the E3 lineup, I never think of workstation. These processors are little beasts. Of course, I always buy the higher frequencies of >3.6GHz.
Exactly. I run a E3 1275 v6 (7700K of the Xeon space) in my home secondary UnRaid server. And what this gives me is ECC memory support as well as access to Intel Quick Sync.
Posted on Reply
#11
Octopuss
What's so important about ECC memory?

And why can't/wouldn't people simply use desktop-class CPU with six cores instead?
Posted on Reply
#12
Fx
Without ECC, a memory error will cause a bad write to disk. Basically, it is an extra layer of protection through prevention.
Posted on Reply
#13
Octopuss
How often does a memory error happen though?

Don't memory errors basically result in BSODs anyway?
Posted on Reply
#14
Fx
Octopuss said:
How often does a memory error happen though?

Don't memory errors basically result in BSODs anyway?
They are kind of rare but not as uncommon as you would think. No, memory errors do not always cause BSODs.

This is a pretty good explanation of ECC although he also covers the ZFS filesystem. Ya might want to grab some coffee or an energy drink to read the whole thing =]
Posted on Reply
#15
Dr_b_
What chipset will this use, and are there any motherboards out now that will support it?
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#16
Imsochobo
Fx said:
The main reason that I buy Xeon is because it has better support in server platforms and also provides ECC capability for the servers I build. i7's and i5's do not support ECC :banghead:
Home server = ryzen easy, supports ECC.

In a small business it'd be maybe some ryzen embedded, threadripper or ofc xeon who all have official support for such application and thus are priced higher than a consumer ryzen which also supports it all unofficially as it's up to motherboard vendor.
But with consumer parts you usually can't go screaming to the vendor that it doesn't work as a server :)
Posted on Reply
#17
Prima.Vera
Fx said:
They are kind of rare but not as uncommon as you would think. No, memory errors do not always cause BSODs.

This is a pretty good explanation of ECC although he also covers the ZFS filesystem. Ya might want to grab some coffee or an energy drink to read the whole thing =]
A lot of "if"s and "could"s on that article, which is also full of the very worst case scenarios and paranoia.
For a normal user, those are irrelevaant tbh...
Posted on Reply
#18
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
btarunr said:
Up to 6 cores and 12 threads
Up to 6 cores? :wtf:
Posted on Reply
#19
Bones
Just looks to be something amounting to throwing stuff at the wall to see what sticks.
May be good for some server applications but clearly there's better to be had for less than these would go for. Also since it's a Xeon the price will be high too, doesn't make much sense at all for standard desktop use either.
Can't say they aren't trying but I see this hitting said wall and sliding down..... Like a pickle slung on a window.

We've all done that somewhere before......:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#20
Apocalypsee
Intel still pulling the same dirty trick requiring different chipset from desktop counterparts, and its not compatible with previous C236 chipset too despite using the same socket.
Posted on Reply
#21
Berfs1
Fx said:
These shouldn't be too bad (<$400 estimation) since they are the successor to the E3 series. The E5 and E7 series is where price got stupid. Not just workstations, these make for great home servers running FreeNAS or ESXI. They didn't provide base frequencies, but they are typically high due to fewer cores. I noticed this is a jump to six core (thank you AMD) so that is welcome.
AMD didn't force Intel to make six core CPUs. For the last time, it was just a coincident due to time. However, yes, AMD practically forced Intel to make them cheaper. I can tell you that they would have been a few hundred dollars more expensive, quote Intel engineers themselves.
Posted on Reply
#22
GorbazTheDragon
It's funny to see people whinge about these products when they have always been very compelling alternatives to the normal i5/7 lineup...

The quad core HT variants of these might become very interesting alternatives next to the 4c4t i3s and 6c6t i5s
Posted on Reply
#23
GlacierXD
Octopuss said:
So what is the point of this? PCIe lanes?
Mostly ECC memory.
Posted on Reply
#24
Apocalypsee
GorbazTheDragon said:
It's funny to see people whinge about these products when they have always been very compelling alternatives to the normal i5/7 lineup...

The quad core HT variants of these might become very interesting alternatives next to the 4c4t i3s and 6c6t i5s
Its a good alternative if it can be used on the same motherboard as normal i3/i5/i7 but it isnt.
Posted on Reply
#25
Assimilator
Fx said:
The main reason that I buy Xeon is because it has better support in server platforms and also provides ECC capability for the servers I build. i7's and i5's do not support ECC :banghead:
Celeron, Pentium and i3 do support ECC though, and for most home servers/NASes those chips will be more than good enough.

Octopuss said:
So what is the point of this? PCIe lanes?
These "Xeons" are simply Coffee Lake chips with a few bridges cut to enable ECC support and slightly different clock bins, and of course the price hiked - that's it. Allowing Intel to get more money from enterprise customers is the only point.

The "up to 40 PCIe lanes" is a new, sleazy Intel marketing strategy of combining the CPU and chipset lanes to make it look like the platform is far better than it is. I would love to see AMD hit back at this with a Ryzen marketing campaign, something along the lines of "our consumer CPUs support ECC, why can't yours Intel?" and/or "real CPUs have 24 real PCIe lanes".

Imsochobo said:
Home server = ryzen easy, supports ECC.

In a small business it'd be maybe some ryzen embedded, threadripper or ofc xeon who all have official support for such application and thus are priced higher than a consumer ryzen which also supports it all unofficially as it's up to motherboard vendor.
But with consumer parts you usually can't go screaming to the vendor that it doesn't work as a server :)
There are a lot of claims floating around that Ryzen doesn't have "true" ECC, it just supports ECC memory. And even though the Ryzen CPU does, it's up to the motherboard vendors whether they want to support ECC on their boards - many do not. Finally, the Ryzen APUs do not support ECC, which means if you are building a home server you need a discrete GPU, which means you need a board with at least 2 PCIe slots if you want/need to run something like a RAID card, which rules out an mITX storage build.

GorbazTheDragon said:
It's funny to see people whinge about these products when they have always been very compelling alternatives to the normal i5/7 lineup...

The quad core HT variants of these might become very interesting alternatives next to the 4c4t i3s and 6c6t i5s
What exactly makes these chips more compelling than the Core line? 100MHz extra boost clocks?
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