Sunday, September 2nd 2018

Intel Core i9-9900K De-lidded, Soldered IHS Confirmed

With its 9th generation Core processors, Intel is re-introducing soldered IHS (integrated heatspreaders), at least in its top two premium models, the Core i9-9900K, and the Core i7-9700K. Intel refers to this feature as STIM (soldered thermal interface material). AMD implements soldered IHS across its Ryzen "Summit Ridge," "Pinnacle Ridge," and Threadripper families. XFastest took apart an i9-9900K to confirm that Intel is indeed using solder. Soldered IHS is generally preferred for better heat-transfer characteristics, compared to fluid TIMs. The use of fluid TIMs prompts some serious enthusiasts to even "de-lid" (run their processors without the IHS).

The 8-core "Whiskey Lake-S" die could be around 178 mm² in area, with the addition of two more cores, and 4.5 MB more cache (L2 + L3), over its predecessor. You'll recall that the 6-core "Coffee Lake" die measures 150 mm², a 25 mm² gain over the 4-core "Kaby Lake" die. We aren't expecting Intel to change the iGPU or uncore components. Intel is building these dies on the same 14 nm++ silicon fabrication node as "Coffee Lake," with the only architectural difference being silicon-level hardening against certain security vulnerabilities.
Source: XFastest (Facebook)
Add your own comment

21 Comments on Intel Core i9-9900K De-lidded, Soldered IHS Confirmed

#1
TheOne
Now if we could only get Intel to officially announce them with release date and pricing.
Posted on Reply
#2
First Strike
i7 get soldered too? Great, it will be funny to see if they uses TIM on Cascade Lake. I bet they will.
Posted on Reply
#3
mcraygsx
I am glad Intel has finally rediscovered the potential benefits of soldered IHS. I sure miss my 5930K where temps were linear and high end coolers really made a difference where as temps on my 7700K are too spike regardless of the LLC settings.
Posted on Reply
#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
First Strike, post: 3896724, member: 172415"
i7 get soldered too? Great, it will be funny to see if they uses TIM on Cascade Lake. I bet they will.
Latest info/leaks/rumors suggest i9-9900K and i7-9700K get STIM, while the i5-9600K still gets hemorrhoid cream.
Posted on Reply
#5
mcraygsx
btarunr, post: 3896737, member: 43587"
Latest info/leaks/rumors suggest i9-9900K and i7-9700K get STIM, while the i5-9600K still gets hemorrhoid cream.
We cant make those Delid & Relid kit's useless now can we? :D
Posted on Reply
#6
gmn 17
Postponed to 2019? Or day 1 launch in October?
Posted on Reply
#7
dj-electric
gmn 17, post: 3896746, member: 100603"
Postponed to 2019? Or day 1 launch in October?
It would not launch in Nov\Dec.
:)
Posted on Reply
#8
RejZoR
If solder cracking is the main argument for not using solder, why don't they use liquid metal then? It has superior thermal conductivity, won't ever crack and it's a metal so it won't age and degrade the way toothpaste does. Because almost 90% of arguments consisted of solder cracking and ruining the CPU...
Posted on Reply
#9
Gungar
dj-electric, post: 3896767, member: 87186"
It would not launch in Nov\Dec.
:)
Mr. Prophet just passing by.
Posted on Reply
#10
First Strike
RejZoR, post: 3896773, member: 1515"
If solder cracking is the main argument for not using solder, why don't they use liquid metal then? It has superior thermal conductivity, won't ever crack and it's a metal so it won't age and degrade the way toothpaste does. Because almost 90% of arguments consisted of solder cracking and ruining the CPU...
Liquid metal could fry the board, in case you haven't noticed. And it will certainly cause some environmental compliance issues.
Posted on Reply
#11
Chloe Price
This on the news post "The use of fluid TIMs prompts some serious enthusiasts to even "de-lid" (run their processors without the IHS).", running naked is pretty damn rare.. We just change the toothpaste to liquid metal. ;)



mcraygsx, post: 3896739, member: 151421"
We cant make those Delid & Relid kit's useless now can we? :D
Never heard of anyone relidding, why even anyone should? o_O

First Strike, post: 3896796, member: 172415"
Liquid metal could fry the board, in case you haven't noticed. And it will certainly cause some environmental compliance issues.
I doubt that after Intel's factory installation it would get out from under the IHS and fry the board. For over 6 years (when Ivy Bridge was launched and people started delidding) I can count the times I've seen people goofing around with liquid metal with one hand's fingers. And who cares about the latter.
Posted on Reply
#12
Midland Dog
finally intel woke up, now if only they segmented the market better, i9 8/16, i7 6/12, i5 4/8, i3 2/4
Posted on Reply
#13
Outback Bronze
So they are putting solder on these chips but they didn't do it on the much more expensive Core i9-7980XE.. Shame..
Posted on Reply
#14
Jism
RejZoR, post: 3896773, member: 1515"
If solder cracking is the main argument for not using solder, why don't they use liquid metal then? It has superior thermal conductivity, won't ever crack and it's a metal so it won't age and degrade the way toothpaste does. Because almost 90% of arguments consisted of solder cracking and ruining the CPU...
I have'nt seen a bulldozer CPU being cracked over time. LC does wear out over time... I am not sure if this is the perfect answer to a non-soldered IHS. And second; LC is a mixture with galium and is not suitable for alu-based IHS'es. It's not so easy as you think.

If you want the best parts then either delid yourself or buy the premium ones that come soldered.
Posted on Reply
#15
RejZoR
Jism, post: 3896846, member: 91255"
I have'nt seen a bulldozer CPU being cracked over time. LC does wear out over time... I am not sure if this is the perfect answer to a non-soldered IHS. And second; LC is a mixture with galium and is not suitable for alu-based IHS'es. It's not so easy as you think.

If you want the best parts then either delid yourself or buy the premium ones that come soldered.
Shit, I never thought of IHS being aluminium. Everyone warns not to use Conductonaut on aluminium heatsinks, but no one ever raised the question of what material is used for IHS. It didn't even cross my mind until you mentioned it just now...
Posted on Reply
#16
stimpy88
Ahhh, now all the stupid fanbois with more money than common sense can go out and buy yet another "new" CPU with know security faults baked right in.
Posted on Reply
#17
Jism


People need to be tought proberly on the use of liquid metal. :D
Posted on Reply
#18
Outback Bronze
Intel's IHS is copper plated with nickel or so it seams. That could change in the future..
Posted on Reply
#19
Midland Dog
Jism, post: 3896856, member: 91255"


People need to be tought proberly on the use of liquid metal. :D
go on youtube and look up nurdrage gallium baseball bat, its amazing to watch

Outback Bronze, post: 3896837, member: 97514"
So they are putting solder on these chips but they didn't do it on the much more expensive Core i9-7980XE.. Shame..
for shame indeed, the 7980xe's temps arent helped by the FIVR either, i reckon if they used the same voltage control as skylake and up and ivy bridge and down it would be a monster on ln2
Posted on Reply
#20
RejZoR
Outback Bronze, post: 3896891, member: 97514"
Intel's IHS is copper plated with nickel or so it seams. That could change in the future..
Got a bit scared after using liquid metal (Conductonaut) and it really badly stained my IHS in just 1 month time. I had to physically polish AiO water block (copper), but I can't CPU IHS without erasing all the model engravings... Liquid metal may be superior, but it's just so many things no one talks about or rarely. Frankly, I wouldn't go the path of liquid metal anymore. I'm sticking with top of the line thermal pastes like Kryonaut and MasterGel Maker Nano... Much more convenient and hassle free with damn close results in the end.
Posted on Reply
#21
R-T-B
Chloe Price, post: 3896801, member: 123719"
And who cares about the latter.
I dunno, factories who don't want fines?
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment