Thursday, September 6th 2018

AMD Announces "Zen" Based Athlon and 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors

AMD today announced a reimagined family of AMD Athlon desktop processors with Radeon Vega graphics that have been optimized for everyday PC users: the AMD Athlon 200GE, Athlon 220GE, and Athlon 240GE processor. Combining the high-performance x86 "Zen" core and "Vega"] graphics architectures in a versatile System-on-Chip (SOC) design, the Athlon desktop processors offer responsive and reliable computing for a wide range of experiences, from day-to-day needs like web browsing and video streaming through more advanced workloads like high-definition PC gaming. Complementing this news, AMD announced the availability of the commercial-grade Athlon PRO 200GE desktop processor, along with three 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processor models for the commercial, enterprise, and the public sector: the Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700, and Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 processors. With these new introductions, AMD now offers a top-to-bottom line-up of professional-grade computing solutions for experiences that range from premium content creation to advanced multitasking and office productivity.

"We are proud to expand our successful "Zen" core-based consumer and commercial product portfolios today with the addition of AMD Athlon, AMD Athlon PRO, and 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen PRO desktop processors. The new Athlon desktop processors, now incorporating the advanced "Zen" core and "Vega"3 graphics architectures, energize a legendary processor brand in AMD Athlon - a brand that consumers and PC enthusiasts alike trusted throughout nearly two decades of innovation," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, Client Compute, AMD. "Additionally, we are continuing to offer business PC users more processing power than we ever have before with the launch of 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processors into the commercial market."
AMD Athlon 200GE Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics
The highly efficient "Zen" architecture helps the AMD Athlon 200GE processor stay cool and quiet for reliable computing experiences, while its "Zen" processor and graphics cores enable responsive PC performance and fluid experiences for games or HD movies. In addition, the AMD Athlon 200GE processor is supported by the existing AMD Socket AM4 infrastructure for a platform that delivers the latest PC features including DDR4 memory, NVMe storage, 4K display support, USB 3.1 Gen2 support, and that offers an easy upgrade path to even more performance with AMD Ryzen processors and discrete graphics cards.

The AMD Athlon 200GE desktop processor offers:
  • Up to 169 percent more responsive computing than AMD's previous generation AMD A6-9500E
  • Up to 67 percent more GPU performance and up to 2X greater power efficiency than the competition
  • Up to 84 percent faster high-definition PC gaming than the competition
AMD Athlon PRO and 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors
AMD PRO processors are designed for business, bringing reliability, security, and performance to address the demands of today's compute-intensive enterprise-focused workloads. All AMD PRO processors across the product stack provide commercial-grade quality and reliability to help ensure platform longevity and support open-standard manageability to enable greater management flexibility in a multi-vendor client environment at a business-friendly price. In addition, AMD GuardMI technology enables state-of-the-art, power-on to power-off, silicon-level security that helps protect against an ever-growing number of threats.

Built on x86 "Zen" core, both Athlon PRO 200GE and 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processors provide breakthrough responsiveness for the most demanding enterprise-class applications and multi-tasking workflows.
  • Athlon PRO 200GE processor offers
    o Up to 19% faster system performance than the competition
    o Up to 67% faster graphics performance than the competition
  • Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X processor delivers
    o Up to 10% higher multiprocessing performance than the 1st Gen Ryzen 7 PRO 1700X
    o Up to 24% more CPU performance than the competition
    o Up to 18% better performance than the competition
Availability
The AMD Athlon 200GE processor will be available from global retailers and system integrators starting Sept. 18, 2018, and the Athlon 220GE and 240GE processor models are slated for launch in Q4 2018. The AMD Athlon PRO 200GE and 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processors will be available with major global OEMs including Dell, HP, and Lenovo systems, dependent on respective OEM launch schedules.
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18 Comments on AMD Announces "Zen" Based Athlon and 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors

#1
Caring1
Was there a Ryzen 7 Pro 1700X?
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLaughingMan
The PRO label just means OEM only. The parts usually have a lower clock speed to accommodate the lower grade cooling.

Also the Athlon 200 GE is locked for some reason.
Posted on Reply
#4
Valantar
TheLaughingMan said:
The PRO label just means OEM only. The parts usually have a lower clock speed to accommodate the lower grade cooling.

Also the Athlon 200 GE is locked for some reason.
PRO SKUs also support ECC memory.
Posted on Reply
#5
notb
Valantar said:
PRO SKUs also support ECC memory.
Nope.
The chip can work in ECC mode - exactly like normal Ryzen.
Posted on Reply
#6
TheGuruStud
notb said:
Nope.
The chip can work in ECC mode - exactly like normal Ryzen.
Hehe, he thinks AMD is crooked like intel.
Posted on Reply
#7
Valantar
notb said:
Nope.
The chip can work in ECC mode - exactly like normal Ryzen.
TheGuruStud said:
Hehe, he thinks AMD is crooked like intel.
Hm. I've seen several motherboard specs specifying that ECC support is limited to (or "available with") Pro SKUs. Is that then just BS, or can MB manufacturers limit this somehow?
Posted on Reply
#8
TheGuruStud
Valantar said:
Hm. I've seen several motherboard specs specifying that ECC support is limited to (or "available with") Pro SKUs. Is that then just BS, or can MB manufacturers limit this somehow?
I guess if they're losers, then it could be disabled by uefi. Historically, afaik, only cheapo boards didn't come with ecc support, b/c they literally were too cheap to make the extra traces.
Posted on Reply
#9
notb
Valantar said:
Hm. I've seen several motherboard specs specifying that ECC support is limited to (or "available with") Pro SKUs. Is that then just BS, or can MB manufacturers limit this somehow?
I precisely said "can work in ECC mode", not "support". AMD does not support ECC in Ryzen lineup (both consumer and PRO).

ECC is "supported" (or "validated") when CPU manufacturer confirmed it works as it should and, as a result, takes responsibility if it malfunctions.
It's basically the same story as with all other products designed for professional use (certification and stuff). :-)
TheGuruStud said:
Hehe, he thinks AMD is crooked like intel.
Who said Intel is "crooked"? Basically all existing x86 CPUs can work with ECC memory.
Any modern x86 Intel CPU paired with an ECC-enabled chipset (and ECC RAM, obviously) should work just fine in ECC mode.
Posted on Reply
#10
TheGuruStud
notb said:
I precisely said "can work in ECC mode", not "support". AMD does not support ECC in Ryzen lineup (both consumer and PRO).

ECC is "supported" (or "validated") when CPU manufacturer confirmed it works as it should and, as a result, takes responsibility if it malfunctions.
It's basically the same story as with all other products designed for professional use (certification and stuff). :)

Who said Intel is "crooked"? Basically all existing x86 CPUs can work with ECC memory.
Any modern x86 Intel CPU paired with an ECC-enabled chipset (and ECC RAM, obviously) should work just fine in ECC mode.
Good luck. Intel lied on their spec pages for i3s. And I believe anything z270/z370 has ecc disabled. Took over a decade to get virtualization on cheaper chips.

And lol at modern. They intentionally crippled everything before and it hasn't let up too much.
Posted on Reply
#11
StrayKAT
Would love to see some cheap (but respectable), product like this attract others and revive PC gaming (revive it more than it has been, that is). No reason to be buying a console anymore....other than maybe the simple interfaces.
Posted on Reply
#12
notb
TheGuruStud said:
Good luck. Intel lied on their spec pages for i3s.
If you think they lied, why not sue them? Surely, you would won and could finally afford the Ryzen you love so much. :-P
No, seriously, ECC is supported on few i3 and multiple Pentium/Celeron/Atom CPUs.

You need a chipset that supports ECC and none of the "consumer" kind does. But assuming you have a proper mobo, you can basically use any 1151 CPU and ECC should be functional.
And I believe anything z270/z370 has ecc disabled.
Z270 is a gaming chipset.
Posted on Reply
#13
TheGuruStud
notb said:
If you think they lied, why not sue them? Surely, you would won and could finally afford the Ryzen you love so much. :p
No, seriously, ECC is supported on few i3 and multiple Pentium/Celeron/Atom CPUs.

You need a chipset that supports ECC and none of the "consumer" kind does. But assuming you have a proper mobo, you can basically use any 1151 CPU and ECC should be functional.

Z270 is a gaming chipset.
"chipset" Chipsets don't exist. They're IO hubs. Intel is disabling it. No ecc for you until you go HEDT is what they want. So, yeah, you'd have to buy a supermicro board for the CPUs that do support it...smells like a higher markup for intel....
Posted on Reply
#14
notb
TheGuruStud said:
"chipset" Chipsets don't exist. They're IO hubs. Intel is disabling it.
Seriously, can't you just check this instead of repeating the same mistake?
No ecc for you until you go HEDT is what they want.
Again: wrong. Intel's so-called "HEDT" (socket 2066, 2011 etc) doesn't support ECC either.
So, yeah, you'd have to buy a supermicro board for the CPUs that do support it...smells like a higher markup for intel....
You'd have to buy an enterprise mobo for a custom build, correct. But id doesn't have to be by Supermicro.
Few other manufacturers make motherboards with C-series chipsets.
Example: Gigabyte GA-X150M-PRO ECC

The reason why Intel certifies its Atom, Celeron, Pentium and a few i3 with ECC is because these CPUs are used in servers / IoT.
Posted on Reply
#15
TheGuruStud
notb said:
Seriously, can't you just check this instead of repeating the same mistake?

Again: wrong. Intel's so-called "HEDT" (socket 2066, 2011 etc) doesn't support ECC either.

You'd have to buy an enterprise mobo for a custom build, correct. But id doesn't have to be by Supermicro.
Few other manufacturers make motherboards with C-series chipsets.
Example: Gigabyte GA-X150M-PRO ECC

The reason why Intel certifies its Atom, Celeron, Pentium and a few i3 with ECC is because these CPUs are used in servers / IoT.
Lmao, I was thinking they did (mostly from cost). That's beyond pathetic.

And, no, I'm (99% sure) not wrong about "chipsets". Intel forbids it to be enabled on the boards. There's no technical reason other than the traces aren't there, since ecc is banned on consumer boards. They really don't want anyone sticking the low end CPUs in them. The boards won't even boot with it, which also tells the story. Unless you want to tell me that whole old northbridge hasn't been integrated on-die for all these years, now :P

Let's fully regress and remove Vtd from everything, too, and segment by "chipset".
Posted on Reply
#16
notb
TheGuruStud said:
Lmao, I was thinking they did (mostly from cost). That's beyond pathetic.
You're thinking and assuming a lot. Why not learn something for a change? :-P
And, no, I'm (99% sure) not wrong about "chipsets". Intel forbids it to be enabled on the boards. There's no technical reason other than the traces aren't there, since ecc is banned on consumer boards.
I feel like discussing whether you're right or wrong in your "being sure"s is fairly pointless at this point.

As for the issue:
Yes, Intel may want to block ECC on consumer PCs. Not a big deal for customers (ECC, seriously?) and possibly a big cost saver for Intel.
It's not like they don't offer ECC at all. They simply offer it in specific product lineups.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get an ECC-verified Intel CPU these days - even putting aside all the ECC-friendly Atoms, Pentiums and i3s.
You can simply get a cheap Xeon. They're offered in 4- and 6-core variants and start at around $300.
Let's fully regress and remove Vtd from everything, too, and segment by "chipset".
Virtualization is a fundamental feature for business and very popular among consumers as well. ECC is really only important for production and just a luxury everything else.
Posted on Reply
#17
Chloe Price
Hasn't ECC worked with AMD for like always?

My HTPC has a Phenom II X4 955 BE, Asus MB with NForce 720D chipset and 2x2GB Hynix DDR2-800 ECC, ECC works perfectly.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheLaughingMan
Chloe Price said:
Hasn't ECC worked with AMD for like always?

My HTPC has a Phenom II X4 955 BE, Asus MB with NForce 720D chipset and 2x2GB Hynix DDR2-800 ECC, ECC works perfectly.
It has always been a feature that is available on AMD chips since the memory controller was moved to an on chip design. But as stated before, it would be up to the mobo manufacturers to including the additional traces for that extra 8-bits of data. So if you have an AMD chip, ECC RAM, and a mobo that has support for ECC, it should work. Often, also as discussed before, this is not always tested to confirm the functionality.

I have a Ryzen 1800 and a board that supports it, but I don't have ECC RAM to test it with.
Posted on Reply
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