Wednesday, September 26th 2018

Silicon Lottery Posts its Pricing of the Core i9-9900K and i7-9700K

Silicon Lottery is an online retailer that sells computer hardware its employees personally bin to pick out the best performing parts, at higher-than-MSRP prices. It listed its pricing for the upcoming Intel Core i9-9900K 8-core/16-thread processor, and the Core i7-9700K 8-core/8-thread part. The site currently reports both parts as "sold out" either because they've actually sold out all their pre-order inventory, or because they have't built inventories yet. Regardless, the i9-9900K is listed at USD $479.99, and the i7-9700K at $369.99.

We've been actively tracking down possible list prices of Intel's 9th generation Core processors. Our most recent article on the topic predicts the i9-9900K to be priced around $450, the i7-9700K at $350, and the i5-9600K at $250. Either Silicon Lottery's listings don't include any premiums, or Intel could surprise us with prices lower than our predictions.
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21 Comments on Silicon Lottery Posts its Pricing of the Core i9-9900K and i7-9700K

#1
sepheronx
Well now, that is a good price.

I mean, that is of course USD but still. I mean I could see myself going with a Core i9.

Then again, I have no money.
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#3
GreiverBlade
kastriot said:
Too expensive.
and also too surrealist ... where i live the X700K has always been 400$+ sooo more likely the 9700K =479$ and the 9900K will be 500+ (and the 9600K around 300... after all i never saw MSRP for my 6600K, luckily it was an insurance case over a 4690K ... but the price was closer to 325$ than 225$ )

another step for a 2600X/2700X (229/319) or waiting Zen 2
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#4
hat
Enthusiast
Yikes. Too rich for my blood (even at suspected MSRP pricing).
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#6
HELLSMAN
Damm nice chip, but not ready for a platform upgrade just yet, Want some new features to be available such as HDMI revision both GPU/MOBO side, DDR5, PCIe 4.0, hopefully 2019 will be a good year for some of this shit. My 7700k while a very nice OC @ 5.3 -2AVX is limited in core count and not sure how well it will hold up due to AMD igniting the core war which is a dam good thing about time progress was forced. Newer titles should start to take full advantage and leave a substantial gap between lower core count chips.
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#7
sepheronx
Thats expensive? I guess it is but less than I thought it would be. I remember Extreme Edition processor costs so I figure $500 for a Core i9 isn't so bad. Maybe I am wrong.
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#8
trog100
currently a 8700K is listed at £449.99 on Scan UK...

this dosnt fit well with the suggested next generation prices..

trog
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#10
Caring1
On topic kind of, how do SL get their hands on Processors to test and bin them?
Do they have Intel contacts that allow them access before shipping to retailers, or are they those scumbags that take advantage of return policies and test then return lower binned chips?
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#11
lexluthermiester
Caring1 said:
On topic kind of, how do SL get their hands on Processors to test and bin them?
Do they have Intel contacts that allow them access before shipping to retailers, or are they those scumbags that take advantage of return policies and test then return lower binned chips?
They likely buy in bulk, test all samples and sell off the ones that don't meet the standards they set in-house.
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#12
Caring1
lexluthermiester said:
They likely buy in bulk, test all samples and sell off the ones that don't meet the standards they set in-house.
I hope so, I prefer that version.
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#13
lexluthermiester
Caring1 said:
I hope so, I prefer that version.
It's unlikely to be anything else.
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#14
the54thvoid
Caring1 said:
On topic kind of, how do SL get their hands on Processors to test and bin them?
Do they have Intel contacts that allow them access before shipping to retailers, or are they those scumbags that take advantage of return policies and test then return lower binned chips?
lexluthermiester said:
They likely buy in bulk, test all samples and sell off the ones that don't meet the standards they set in-house.
You can see it with retailers like Overclockers. They sell overclocked, pre-binned chips at a premium. You can also buy OEM chips (out of box) or in box chips. It looks like if you buy an out of box chip (about £10 cheaper) you get the ones that failed to meet the grade for pre-binned. I guess the in box chips are the ones they haven't tested.
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#15
B-Real
We have 2700 for 290, 2700X for 320, 2600 for 165 and 2600X for 220. X versions also include coolers and as I know K Intels do not. So no, thank you.
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#16
R0H1T
sepheronx said:
Thats expensive? I guess it is but less than I thought it would be. I remember Extreme Edition processor costs so I figure $500 for a Core i9 isn't so bad. Maybe I am wrong.
The EE processors now cost $2k (from Intel) & require a new socket, if you prefer MSDT to also have an EE halo product then be ready to shell out a grand or so for such a product.
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#17
TheinsanegamerN
sepheronx said:
Thats expensive? I guess it is but less than I thought it would be. I remember Extreme Edition processor costs so I figure $500 for a Core i9 isn't so bad. Maybe I am wrong.
It isnt for what is on offer.

A 2700x from AMD tops out at 4.2, 4.3 GHZ with a lot of work and cooling, and it cost $320.

Intel's $480 chip here offers 8 cores, faster cache, better IPC, better memory controller, and the ability to clock to 5 GHz rather easily for $480, or 50% more then AMD. Oh, and a soldered IHS this time around.

For raw performance, that i9 crushes ryzen 2700x.
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#18
Gasaraki
$450 --> $479 is not a premium for a stock CPU?
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#19
trog100
piloponth said:
This prices are unrealistic. There is currently price surge happening with Intel CPUs. TechPowerUp should cover this story.

https://www.guru3d.com/news-story/prices-intel-coffee-lake-procs-are-skyrocketing-due-to-14nm-shortages.html
thanks for the uptake and link.. but if shortages are effecting the price of the current generation of chips its for sure the next one aint gonna cost what the rumors are suggesting.. he he

and as you say TPU is missing the ball on this one..

trog
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#20
E-curbi
piloponth said:
This prices are unrealistic. There is currently price surge happening with Intel CPUs. TechPowerUp should cover this story.

https://www.guru3d.com/news-story/prices-intel-coffee-lake-procs-are-skyrocketing-due-to-14nm-shortages.html
Agree 100%.

If Intel's 14nm shortage is REAL and not (fab)ricated. See what I did there? :D

We may have a repeat of the 8700K launch last year, just try to find one anywhere at suggested MSRP for the first three months, Supply didn't catch up to demand until December 2017. Looking farther back to this time in 2015, the 6700K also had severe shortages and inflated prices for months after the official launch.

I think many of these shortages are contrived internally by Intel to extend the "early adopters fee" as long as they possibly can. (4)months after launch you are now still an early adopter, lol.

:)
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#21
ArbitraryAffection
Cheaper than I expected, but still not overwhelming IMHO. That said these will be the first Intel product in quite some time that actually looks attractive to me, especially the 9700K with its 8 real cores and soldered IHS. That will be great for high refresh rate gaming I think. On the other hand: Ryzen is still extremely competitive even at current prices. I don't think AMD really need to adjust their lineup to counter these parts. The Ryzen 5 2600 for £150 here in the UK is an absolute steal, and I picked one up not too long ago and I am extremely satisfied with the performance in and out of games. I play at 60 Hz and cap my frame rate to 62 FPS in most titles and the 2600 at stock speeds (3.7~ all core in games) is pushing that frame rate pretty much all of the time. I do a lot of multi-tasking too, with a home CCTV-server running 24/7 on my PC with software decode/encode alongside my gaming sessions, and I haven't noticed any slowdowns. Here in the UK, Intel CPU prices have become absolutely absurd. The i3-8100 is the closest competition to the 2600 in price, in fact it is at the time of writing in my two favourite retailers, £40 more expensive. I just don't see how they can sell those with Ryzen CPUs on the market.
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