Thursday, November 8th 2018

Eurocom Unveils Tornado F7W Mobile Workstation

Eurocom launches another supercomputer class laptop, the Tornado F7 Mobile Workstation powered by 8cores/16threads Intel i9 9900K processor with NVIDIA's high performance Quadro P52000 upgradeable GPU technology.

Eurocom launches the world's most powerful laptop powered by Intel's newest i9 9900K 8 core/16 thread processor and the super-powerful Quadro P5200, called the Tornado F7W. The system comes with a 17.3-inch display, supports up to 128GB of ECC memory, up to 22TB of storage and weighs 4.14kg (9.1 lbs). The Tornado F7W supports a range array of high-performance, modular MXM 3.1, workstation-class GPU's including the Quadro P5200, P4200 and P3200.

The GPU's are upgradeable via MXM 3.1, slot-based GPU technology and the size of each module is 82mm x 105mm. Eurocom offers a wide-choice of processors ranging from i9 9900K, i7 9700K-which are 8-core CPU's, as well as Xeon 6Core/12Thread E-2816G CPUs. These processors are LGA 1151 socket-based, allowing for future upgrades to next-generation processors once they are available.
The Tornado F7W comes loaded with security features critical to the management of intellectual property assets of users, companies and organizations. It is equipped with a SmartCard Reader and a Fingerprint scanner for security access as well as TPM 2.0 and BIOS disk encryption for data encryption. These added security features by Eurocom improve the protection of intellectual property assets and restrict access to critical data.

Capable of supporting both ECC and non-ECC memory up to a total 128 GB of DDR4 RAM, the Tornado F7W is one of the very few laptop designs to utilize both ECC and non-ECC memory in the same physical model. ECC memory is used with Xeon-class CPU's while non-ECC memory is used with i7 and i9 processors.

In terms of storage space, the Tornado TFW supports up to 5 physical drives with a total space of 22TB. It supports three M.2 NVMe SSD slots and two 2.5-inch SATA3 bays running in multiple RAID configurations-including RAID 0/1/5/10. It also allows RAID 0/1/5 configuration with NVME SSD's. This feature is also uncommon in most of the high-end laptops in the market today and is one of the many reasons Eurocom laptops stand above the rest, in terms of offering power users extra capabilities they need to perform complex tasks and processes.

When it comes to security, Eurocom offers and optional, "anti-hacking protection suite," consisting of the removal of webcam, microphone and WLAN. This allows for protection of intellectual assets and further defends against malware, tampering and theft of intellectual assets and/or data.

The Tornado F7W is loaded with many ports allowing the usage of 4 total displays. The following ports are also provided: Thunderbolt 3.0, 5 x USB 3.1, HDMI 2.0- just to name a few.

Eurocom supports variety of operating systems in the Tornado F7W including VMware, Microsoft Server 2016, Windows 10 and Linux. Tornado F7W provides full network manageability via its VPro-based Intel I219-LM 1GbE controller on-board - allowing seamless integration into enterprise networks as well as providing remote management and control.

Tornado F7W Core Features:
  • Display: 17.3 inch/43.9 cm; choice of FHD, UHD 4K; 120Hz, 60Hz; supports total 4 displays
  • GPU: MXM 3.1, upgradeable, choice of NVIDIA Quadro P3200 (6GB); P4200 (8GB) and P5200 (16GB)
  • CPUs: Choice of LGA1151 CPUs; 6 cores/12 threads- (Xeon E-2176G, Xeon E-2186G, i7 8700, i7 8700K, i7 8086K); 8 cores/8 threads- (i7 9700K); 8 cores/16 threads - (i9 9900K)
  • Memory: up to 128GB via four SODIMM slots; EEC and non-ECC depending on CPU used.
  • Storage: up to 5 physical drives with RAID 0/1/5, NVME, up to 22TB of storage; three M.2 NVMe SSD and two 2.5inch SATA3
  • Operating Systems: choice of VMWare, Microsoft Server 2016, Windows 10 and Linux
  • Security: SmartCard Reader, TPM 2.0, BIOS Disk Encryption, Security lock, Fingerprint scanner; optional "anti-hacking package" available (removal of webcam, microphone and WLAN)
  • Ports: 1x Thunderbolt 3.0; 5x USB 3.1; Mini Display; HDMI 2.0; Mic in; Headphone S/PDIF out; Line-in; Line out; RJ-45 / LAN
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17 Comments on Eurocom Unveils Tornado F7W Mobile Workstation

#1
TheLostSwede
Clearly this thing has all of five minutes battery life...
Not that it's likely to matter too much for anyone buying this thing, but still, it's a "mobile" workstation...
Posted on Reply
#2
Durvelle27
Holy hell

This is like the best laptop specs I’ve ever seen
Posted on Reply
#3
Valantar
Have to love that even this behemoth of a "laptop" has bottom-firing speakers. Could they really not find somewhere to put these where they actually face the user?
Posted on Reply
#4
ZeDestructor
"Valantar said:
Have to love that even this behemoth of a "laptop" has bottom-firing speakers. Could they really not find somewhere to put these where they actually face the user?
Not really. Anywhere else is more motherboard, or vents for the most part. If you want top mounted speakers, that means adding an extra 1-2 inches to one laptop width or depth.
Posted on Reply
#5
INSTG8R
"Valantar said:
Have to love that even this behemoth of a "laptop" has bottom-firing speakers. Could they really not find somewhere to put these where they actually face the user?
I’m sure audio is pretty low on the intended customers considerations.
Posted on Reply
#6
Valantar
"INSTG8R said:
I’m sure audio is pretty low on the intended customers considerations.
Sure, but "audio that isn't garbage" is obviously part of the design thinking given that they bothered to give it a """subwoofer""". Not to mention that it might be low on their list of considerations, but that doesn't mean that they dont care, just that they don't think of it until afterwards and then have to buy speakers or headphones. Everyone cares about audio. I'm not talking audiophile-level homeopathic audio quality feels, but having sound that's actually passably full-range and able to reproduce speech or music somewhat faithfully. It really isn't too much to ask, given that Apple manages this in 13" thin-and-light laptops ...
"ZeDestructor said:
Not really. Anywhere else is more motherboard, or vents for the most part. If you want top mounted speakers, that means adding an extra 1-2 inches to one laptop width or depth.
Not true. Where the motherboard is and isn't in the case is a design choice, and there's nothing saying it's somehow better to have it in this exact shape than one where you can place the speakers next to the keyboard. If they placed it next to the caps lock-to-control keys and numpad Enter key, the amount components moved on the motherboard would be tiny. I get that cramming this as tightly as an ultrabook would make it either ridiculously expensive (well, more than it already is) and more likely for something to fail, there's still plenty of free space. Heck, they could just place the drivers wherever is practical and run a resonance chamber to where they want them to output sound. This works perfectly in thin-and-lights, so why not here? This speaks of cheap, poor engineering, and not taking the total product package into consideration when designing the individual components.
Posted on Reply
#7
INSTG8R
"Valantar said:
Sure, but "audio that isn't garbage" is obviously part of the design thinking given that they bothered to give it a """subwoofer""". Not to mention that it might be low on their list of considerations, but that doesn't mean that they dont care, just that they don't think of it until afterwards and then have to buy speakers or headphones. Everyone cares about audio. I'm not talking audiophile-level homeopathic audio quality feels, but having sound that's actually passably full-range and able to reproduce speech or music somewhat faithfully. It really isn't too much to ask, given that Apple manages this in 13" thin-and-light laptops ...
Oh I absolutely agree, audio is very important to me but in laptop applications it’s always going to be sub par/limited in most cases because of space and size. But this is a workstation with emphasis on productivity rather than entertainment. Audio is not really high in the design choice as we can clearly see by their implementation. I totally agree with you but this isn’t a gaming laptop where you expect audio to be of decent quality. I didn’t notice the Sub. My ancient now dead Turion X2 laptop had a “sub” too. Neat idea but it certainly didn’t actually produce anything considered bass. What it did have though was a headphone/optical combo Jack that made up for it so I would run it to my amp and use it as a DJ station bypassing the passable audio altogether as per your point about seeking out better audio solutions.
Posted on Reply
#8
Xx Tek Tip xX
"btarunr said:
These processors are LGA 1151 socket-based, allowing for future upgrades to next-generation processors once they are available.
DId intel even confirm 10th gen will be on lga 1151?
Posted on Reply
#9
ZeDestructor
"Valantar said:
Sure, but "audio that isn't garbage" is obviously part of the design thinking given that they bothered to give it a """subwoofer""". Not to mention that it might be low on their list of considerations, but that doesn't mean that they dont care, just that they don't think of it until afterwards and then have to buy speakers or headphones. Everyone cares about audio. I'm not talking audiophile-level homeopathic audio quality feels, but having sound that's actually passably full-range and able to reproduce speech or music somewhat faithfully. It really isn't too much to ask, given that Apple manages this in 13" thin-and-light laptops ...

Not true. Where the motherboard is and isn't in the case is a design choice, and there's nothing saying it's somehow better to have it in this exact shape than one where you can place the speakers next to the keyboard. If they placed it next to the caps lock-to-control keys and numpad Enter key, the amount components moved on the motherboard would be tiny. I get that cramming this as tightly as an ultrabook would make it either ridiculously expensive (well, more than it already is) and more likely for something to fail, there's still plenty of free space. Heck, they could just place the drivers wherever is practical and run a resonance chamber to where they want them to output sound. This works perfectly in thin-and-lights, so why not here? This speaks of cheap, poor engineering, and not taking the total product package into consideration when designing the individual components.
On the sides, you have the mobo/daughterboard housing the various connectors, half the heatsinks' fin stacks and the vent. Putting speakers there would completely block thing off because of how thick speakers are.

If you want it above the keyboard (like in my M4800), that either cuts into mobo space, or forces you to flip the mobo over so that the main component area is sandwiched between the keyboard and mobo, rather than between the mobo and bottom panel.

Sure, where the motherboard is and how it's shapred are design choices, but there is no option that lets you get everything. There's always a tradeoff, and for this machine, they chose to have bottom-firing speakers in order to have more accessible components and better thermal design (shorter heatpipes and double fan/heatsink exhaust). On my M4800, they put the speakers above the keyboard, but in order to do that, CPU, GPU, mobo and heatsink access are only possible after removing the keyboard and palmrest, a somewhat annoying 15minute endeavour. At least with my M4800 I get a much tougher chassis in exchange...

"INSTG8R said:
Oh I absolutely agree, audio is very important to me but in laptop applications it’s always going to be sub par/limited in most cases because of space and size. But this is a workstation with emphasis on productivity rather than entertainment. Audio is not really high in the design choice as we can clearly see by their implementation. I totally agree with you but this isn’t a gaming laptop where you expect audio to be of decent quality. I didn’t notice the Sub. My ancient now dead Turion X2 laptop had a “sub” too. Neat idea but it certainly didn’t actually produce anything considered bass. What it did have though was a headphone/optical combo Jack that made up for it so I would run it to my amp and use it as a DJ station bypassing the passable audio altogether as per your point about seeking out better audio solutions.
If you're listening to audio in a laptop, odds are you're indeed listening using headphones, and/or better external speakers. Built-in speakers then become the last resort.
Posted on Reply
#10
INSTG8R
"ZeDestructor said:
On the sides, you have the mobo/daughterboard housing the various connectors, half the heatsinks' fin stacks and the vent. Putting speakers there would completely block thing off because of how thick speakers are.

If you want it above the keyboard (like in my M4800), that either cuts into mobo space, or forces you to flip the mobo over so that the main component area is sandwiched between the keyboard and mobo, rather than between the mobo and bottom panel.

Sure, where the motherboard is and how it's shapred are design choices, but there is no option that lets you get everything. There's always a tradeoff, and for this machine, they chose to have bottom-firing speakers in order to have more accessible components and better thermal design (shorter heatpipes and double fan/heatsink exhaust). On my M4800, they put the speakers above the keyboard, but in order to do that, CPU, GPU, mobo and heatsink access are only possible after removing the keyboard and palmrest, a somewhat annoying 15minute endeavour. At least with my M4800 I get a much tougher chassis in exchange...



If you're listening to audio in a laptop, odds are you're indeed listening using headphones, and/or better external speakers. Built-in speakers then become the last resort.
Exactly it’s something that will always be compromised because of the form factor.
Posted on Reply
#11
Valantar
"ZeDestructor said:
If you're listening to audio in a laptop, odds are you're indeed listening using headphones, and/or better external speakers. Built-in speakers then become the last resort.
This is a classic "chicken or egg"-type issue. People have external audio devices because the built-in stuff is crap, and the built-in stuff stays crap because people have external audio devices. Still, as I said before, Apple has shown plenty of times that you can have good audio in a tiny package if you have engineers worth their snuff and bother to do more than glue a speaker to a convenient part of the chassis. Sure, this would probably add ... $10-20 to the parts cost, for a proper custom resonance chamber? Don't think you'd notice that next to your Xeon and Quadro, though. It's such a small thing, yet it would make for a serious quality-of-life improvement for anyone stuck without better speakers or headphones.

Also, audio isn't just for gaming or media consumption. Video editing? Animation and voice dubbing? Other media production involving audio? Of course we won't get studio monitor-quality speakers in there, but having "not-crap" audio is really a minimum requirement for something like this.

Also, what you're saying about the layout is not true. I/O can (ought to? makes for better repairability) be moved to daughterboards connected with flex cables. This would likely make the motherboard cheaper to manufacture, and would allow for more freedom in shaping the motherboard and placing components. You're right that the top doesn't make sense for speakers (there's room in the centre, but that kills stereo separation, and squeezing it above the heatpipes seems impractical, although it could be done with drivers mounted centrally and resonance chambers leading the sound to the sides), but with a laptop this thick there should be zero problem sandwiching a resonance chamber between the side I/O and the keyboard surround, with the speaker placed slightly off to the side. And a laptop speaker like the two we see here is not thick - a few mm including its casing, unless they're using something extra beefy. And even if they were thick, careful placement and a well-designed resonance chamber leading to outlets next to the keyboard would make this no problem at all. Look at the 15" MBP - the speaker drivers are significantly removed from where the audio exits the resonance chamber. And I'm willing to bet that small thin-and-light 15" sounds far superior to this 17" monstrosity.
Posted on Reply
#12
yotano211
This laptop is based on the msi titan shell. Very thick but will keep that i9 processor cool enough.

"Xx Tek Tip xX said:
DId intel even confirm 10th gen will be on lga 1151?
I don't know if Intel will support future upgrades but Eurocom Has a Tendency to release NDA info.
Posted on Reply
#13
TheinsanegamerN
I miss when eurocom and companies like them carried clevo's more interesting stuff. The monster line from clevo carried such insanity as a quad core i7 and a 650m in a 11.6" chassis, and later a somewhat more sane quad core i7 and 970m in a 14" frame.

These days the only laptops getting updates are 15 and 17" laptops. I want another W110ER! An 11.6" gaming laptop using a ryzen 2700u, or something weird and different.
Posted on Reply
#14
king of swag187
"Durvelle27 said:
Holy hell

This is like the best laptop specs I’ve ever seen
Look up P870TM1,P570WM, and X7200

I'd never ever buy a Eurocom product. They have horrible customer service and are generally just annoying to deal with
Also to anyone actually interested, this is just a MSI Titan rebranded. Eurocom does not produce any of their own laptops, they are all shells from Clevo or MSI
This isn't even their flagship product, thats the P870TM1
Posted on Reply
#15
ZeDestructor
"Valantar said:
This is a classic "chicken or egg"-type issue. People have external audio devices because the built-in stuff is crap, and the built-in stuff stays crap because people have external audio devices. Still, as I said before, Apple has shown plenty of times that you can have good audio in a tiny package if you have engineers worth their snuff and bother to do more than glue a speaker to a convenient part of the chassis. Sure, this would probably add ... $10-20 to the parts cost, for a proper custom resonance chamber? Don't think you'd notice that next to your Xeon and Quadro, though. It's such a small thing, yet it would make for a serious quality-of-life improvement for anyone stuck without better speakers or headphones.
Because ultimately no matter how good your engineers are, physics says no. To get good, high-quality audio over the entirety of the human audible range, you need a driver (and often enclosure too) that's large enough for your intended space and loudness. Low-frequencies in open air in particular demand a large driver unless you get a super-sealed enclosure like headphones of some sort.

"Valantar said:
Also, audio isn't just for gaming or media consumption. Video editing? Animation and voice dubbing? Other media production involving audio? Of course we won't get studio monitor-quality speakers in there, but having "not-crap" audio is really a minimum requirement for something like this.
The cheap, portable way to get compact studio monitor quality audio is to get a decent pair of headphones. Or just plugging in studio monitors when in your usual workspace.

"Valantar said:
Also, what you're saying about the layout is not true. I/O can (ought to? makes for better repairability) be moved to daughterboards connected with flex cables. This would likely make the motherboard cheaper to manufacture, and would allow for more freedom in shaping the motherboard and placing components.
Overall it costs more: every extra cable, connector and daughter board adds a cost. Not just the cost of the parts, but also the cost of engineering, and the cost of a higher failure rate from having more connectors. If you use daughterboards, it costs more than just a single board. Flex cables? even more!

"Valantar said:
You're right that the top doesn't make sense for speakers (there's room in the centre, but that kills stereo separation,
Depends on where exactly you put the speaker: most speakers are less than 20mm diameter and round, so they can be centred, or they can be put at the extreme edges.

"Valantar said:
and squeezing it above the heatpipes seems impractical, although it could be done with drivers mounted centrally and resonance chambers leading the sound to the sides), but with a laptop this thick there should be zero problem sandwiching a resonance chamber between the side I/O and the keyboard surround, with the speaker placed slightly off to the side. And a laptop speaker like the two we see here is not thick - a few mm including its casing, unless they're using something extra beefy. And even if they were thick, careful placement and a well-designed resonance chamber leading to outlets next to the keyboard would make this no problem at all. Look at the 15" MBP - the speaker drivers are significantly removed from where the audio exits the resonance chamber. And I'm willing to bet that small thin-and-light 15" sounds far superior to this 17" monstrosity.
Between the edge of the laptop and the keyboard, there is a finstack and heatpipe array (see picture 3). Putting a speaker or resonance chamber outlet there would easily cut 5mm of finstack height, and that matters when you're trying to cool >300W of heat.

As a sidenote, the whole speaker + resonance chamber assembly of my phone is about 4mm thick. The one in my laptop is even thicker. On that note, have you considered that they are using resonance techniques extensively already? Both of those speaker and that "subwoofer" have resonance chambers behind em, and being bottom-mounted, will take advantage of hard surfaces to reflect sounds upwards to the listener.

PS: resonance chambers are primarily used to improve sound quality of the speakers (particularly bass response), not to make them fit a chassis. The fact it lets you mount your driver away from the sound outlet is just a side benefit, really.
Posted on Reply
#16
Valantar
Well, this throwaway comment turned into a whole thing. Oh well. Let's see.
"ZeDestructor said:
PS: resonance chambers are primarily used to improve sound quality of the speakers (particularly bass response), not to make them fit a chassis. The fact it lets you mount your driver away from the sound outlet is just a side benefit, really.
Have I said anything even remotely suggesting otherwise? That resonance chambers both improve audio quality (when designed right) and make it easier to "move" sound from a well-placed speaker to an outlet port is exactly what makes them great. Not one or the other, but both.

"ZeDestructor said:
Because ultimately no matter how good your engineers are, physics says no. To get good, high-quality audio over the entirety of the human audible range, you need a driver (and often enclosure too) that's large enough for your intended space and loudness. Low-frequencies in open air in particular demand a large driver unless you get a super-sealed enclosure like headphones of some sort.
Sure, to a certain point. The only issue is that you can still get great audio from tiny devices such as the iPad Pro or MacBook Pros. Is it lacking in the low ranges? Sure. Adding a "sub", even a small one, would help tremendously, although the best you can hope for there without a very large driver is "okay for a small room". My comment comes from the fact that the vast majority of audio setups even on behemoth laptops like this doesn't reach the bar of "okay" across any part of the audio spectrum, let alone low-end only.
"ZeDestructor said:
The cheap, portable way to get compact studio monitor quality audio is to get a decent pair of headphones. Or just plugging in studio monitors when in your usual workspace.
Again: there are times and places where you don't have headphones with you or don't have access to large speakers. Are you saying that in those cases, it's okay for makers of >$2000 laptops to say "Oh well, sucks to be you!"? 'Cause to me, that's idiotic, borderline hostile to customers, and a sign of a generally bad attitude.
"ZeDestructor said:
Overall it costs more: every extra cable, connector and daughter board adds a cost. Not just the cost of the parts, but also the cost of engineering, and the cost of a higher failure rate from having more connectors. If you use daughterboards, it costs more than just a single board. Flex cables? even more!
I/O daughterboards can be used across models. Smart design saves by making parts interchangeable. The savings from this can by far outstrip the extra cost from the design over time. Flex cables cost a few cents in bulk, as do their connectors. Otherwise, it's the same hardware just on another, small PCB, and the motherboard becomes slightly cheaper and less complex to boot.
"ZeDestructor said:
Depends on where exactly you put the speaker: most speakers are less than 20mm diameter and round, so they can be centred, or they can be put at the extreme edges.
The extreme edges are likely taken up by the hinge assembly. Moving parts holding a lot of weight need space. So that likely won't work. Also, the extreme edges would be beihind the LCD :P
"ZeDestructor said:
Between the edge of the laptop and the keyboard, there is a finstack and heatpipe array (see picture 3). Putting a speaker or resonance chamber outlet there would easily cut 5mm of finstack height, and that matters when you're trying to cool >300W of heat.
There's visibly open space beneath the lower heatpipes on both sides, and plenty of open space between the USB ports and keyboard edges. No need to interfere with or shrink anything, just pack stuff more densely. Or they could integrate the resonance chamber into the structure of the wrist rest. Shouldn't be too hard, and would have the added benefit of some more structural rigidity.
"ZeDestructor said:
As a sidenote, the whole speaker + resonance chamber assembly of my phone is about 4mm thick. The one in my laptop is even thicker. On that note, have you considered that they are using resonance techniques extensively already? Both of those speaker and that "subwoofer" have resonance chambers behind em, and being bottom-mounted, will take advantage of hard surfaces to reflect sounds upwards to the listener.
You see resonance chambers, I see the bog-standard "we glued a driver to part of the plastic inner frame" design approach. I might be wrong, but I'm doubtful. I've seen too many utter-crap laptop speaker designs to assume otherwise. As for bouncing sound off surfaces, that's theoretically an okay idea, it's just that the case is still blocking the sound from reaching your ears directly (unless you're seated leaning really far back), dramatically lowering volume and potentially distorting the audio.

Tl;dr: they really could have made more of an effort on this. That's really all I'm saying.
Posted on Reply
#17
king of swag187
"Valantar said:
Well, this throwaway comment turned into a whole thing. Oh well. Let's see.


I/O daughterboards can be used across models. Smart design saves by making parts interchangeable. The savings from this can by far outstrip the extra cost from the design over time. Flex cables cost a few cents in bulk, as do their connectors. Otherwise, it's the same hardware just on another, small PCB, and the motherboard becomes slightly cheaper and less complex to boot.

The extreme edges are likely taken up by the hinge assembly. Moving parts holding a lot of weight need space. So that likely won't work. Also, the extreme edges would be beihind the LCD :p

There's visibly open space beneath the lower heatpipes on both sides, and plenty of open space between the USB ports and keyboard edges. No need to interfere with or shrink anything, just pack stuff more densely. Or they could integrate the resonance chamber into the structure of the wrist rest. Shouldn't be too hard, and would have the added benefit of some more structural rigidity.

You see resonance chambers, I see the bog-standard "we glued a driver to part of the plastic inner frame" design approach. I might be wrong, but I'm doubtful. I've seen too many utter-crap laptop speaker designs to assume otherwise. As for bouncing sound off surfaces, that's theoretically an okay idea, it's just that the case is still blocking the sound from reaching your ears directly (unless you're seated leaning really far back), dramatically lowering volume and potentially distorting the audio.

Tl;dr: they really could have made more of an effort on this. That's really all I'm saying.
You would want to take all these complaints and issues up to MSI, this is their laptop with a paint job, Eurocom makes no laptops of their own, and usually takes others and makes them worse.
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