Thursday, February 14th 2019

2019 the Year of 1TB SSDs: Prices Fall by 50%

1-Terabyte SSDs could become a new mainstream-desktop must-have in 2019, as prices of the drives have fallen by 50 percent year-over-year, according to DigiTimes. A 1 TB SATA SSD in the 2.5-inch form-factor can now be had for as little as $99, while faster NVMe drives in the M.2 form-factor start around $130. At the beginning of 2018, 1 TB SATA SSDs used to start around the $160-mark, and NVMe drives north of $200. The 1 TB category includes 960 GB, 1000 GB, and 1024 GB marketed capacities with varying amounts of overprovisioning set by manufacturers.

Falling SSD prices are accelerated by the entry of cost-effective 96-layer 3D NAND flash, higher-density QLC NAND flash, undigested inventories of drives based on older technologies such as 64-layer or TLC NAND flash; and a 15 percent sequential quarterly drop in NAND flash prices in the industry. Growth in speeds of client-segment SSDs have remained largely flat over the year, and not much is to be expected in performance growth other than perhaps the advent of PCIe gen 4.0 based enterprise SSDs towards the end of the year.
Source: DigiTimes
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49 Comments on 2019 the Year of 1TB SSDs: Prices Fall by 50%

#1
Vayra86
Good! Its about time for another 1TB SSD over here.
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#3
R0H1T
Is the price revision worlwide, because I see resellers & retailers still charging 2yrs old prices here?
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#4
lynx29
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
Posted on Reply
#5
bajs11
R0H1T said:
Is the price revision worlwide, because I see resellers & retailers still charging 2yrs old prices here?
yeah its the same in most European countries
I don't know if it has to do with the vendors here are more greedy or if its because of the higher taxes

I bought a 850evo 1tb about two years ago and paid 300 usd and just below 200 usd for a 860 1tb last October
and the cheapest 860 1tb i can find today is around 170 usd and 160 usd for a MX500 1tb. So no where near the quoted 99 usd
Posted on Reply
#6
Vayra86
lynx29 said:
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
Having my doubts too, QLC is readily buying into planned obscolescense territory. Perhaps as a mass storage drive with stuff you barely touch, but beyond that, I'm not going there either.
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#7
kastriot
lynx29 said:
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
I see no issue there, buy 2 use them in raid 1 and no worries.
Posted on Reply
#8
lynx29
kastriot said:
I see no issue there, buy 2 use them in raid 1 and no worries.
for that price I could just buy single MLC at the same size and get faster speeds and have 0 risk :/
Posted on Reply
#9
Vayra86
lynx29 said:
for that price I could just buy single MLC at the same size and get faster speeds and have 0 risk :/
No then you would have higher risk because you'd not have them in RAID. Its a pretty good suggestion, just not to save money.
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#10
Wavetrex
Already having two \o/

It is indeed the year of 1TB SSD's, and judging by the rate of price decrease... 2TB will also become quite affordable for many people.
4TBs are still way overpriced.
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#12
Slizzo
I have a 1TB 960 EVO and a 2TB Micron 2.5". Both cost me around $300 or just under when I got them. Finally are getting in to damn cheap territory.
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#13
Mescalamba
Hm..

..I kinda prefer my SSD to be really reliable. My old 40GB Intel still works. Was expensive as fck, but it works, years after it was made. Pretty sure many cheaply made new ones wont last even one tenth.
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#14
Octavean
Its ideal to buy quality hardware that wont fail but this is getting into theoretical territory. Its understandable to have reliability concerns with respect to QLC. However it doesn't mean that TLC, MLC and SLC based SSD's wont fail.

The reality on the ground is that there are no guarantees that a HDD or SSD won't fail. A manufacturer's warranty is essentially a legal contract between two parties more then anything else.

If the data is impotent then RAID can be helpful but backups in multiple locations is essential. RAID is not in itself a backup. If your plan for averting possible disaster due to a drive failure is "just get what you think is a good drive" then you need to reevaluate.

If the data isn't all that important then no big deal either way,.....
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#15
_UV_
kastriot said:
I see no issue there, buy 2 use them in raid 1 and no worries.
Sorry, but RAID1 can't protect in terms of errors, it mirrors corrupted data and partition tables. This is just waste of money, space, energy. Backups, or Raid6/10/60 is something that you may consider safe.
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#16
lexluthermiester
lynx29 said:
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
Totally with you there.

_UV_ said:
Raid6/10/60 is something that you may consider safe.
RAID5 is safe also as long as you use 4 or more drives.
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#17
TesterAnon
Unless i get 2-4 times the size of a TLC drive at the same time i doubt i will ever touch QLC.
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#18
moproblems99
lynx29 said:
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
Don't people have backups? You get what you deserve if you have one copy of important data.
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#19
megamanxtreme
moproblems99 said:
Don't people have backups? You get what you deserve if you have one copy of important data.
Imagine if the backup drive comes faulty and without knowing it it dies. Suggestion? 2 backup drives? 3? 4? The paranoia.
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#20
moproblems99
megamanxtreme said:
Imagine if the backup drive comes faulty and without knowing it it dies. Suggestion? 2 backup drives? 3? 4? The paranoia.
Well, if you have it in the same location as your main pc and the structure burns down - then what? There is only so much you can do with a limited bank account but worrying about qlc is not one of them other than the hassle of reinstalling everything.
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#21
Th3pwn3r
ITT people crying about low prices instead of being happy. All drives are now cheaper, not just the lower end models.
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#22
noname00
lynx29 said:
I won't trust my data with quad layer nand, but have fun y'all. 2 bit and 3 bit layer only for me.
I keep important data on two internal hard drive and an external one. Some important files are also kept on dropbox. I don't have any issue with a (faster than TLC) QLC drive that will be used only for the OS, applications, temporary/working files and games. If it crashes it will simply get replaced. A few hours of work and that's it.
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#23
aldo11061979
bajs11 said:
yeah its the same in most European countries
I don't know if it has to do with the vendors here are more greedy or if its because of the higher taxes

I bought a 850evo 1tb about two years ago and paid 300 usd and just below 200 usd for a 860 1tb last October
and the cheapest 860 1tb i can find today is around 170 usd and 160 usd for a MX500 1tb. So no where near the quoted 99 usd
Microcenter has 1 TB SSD for $109 search harder
Posted on Reply
#24
dj-electric
aldo11061979 said:
Microcenter has 1 TB SSD for $109 search harder
Those are unpurified trash. DRAMless, nonamed, no-rep products.
Posted on Reply
#25
John Naylor
We keep all data on a pair of internal SSHDs .... these are backed up to a desktop HD dock daily and those or rotated out weekly for off site storage. Have not as yet seen a reason to move data to an SSD as everything that is accessed on it is bottlenecked only by user reaction time. When we can buy 2 TB of reliable SSD storage for $150, that's when I'll move from $ 250 GB. Outside of video, animation and modeling production boxes, just don't see any ROI on that investment.
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