Thursday, February 14th 2019

beyerdynamic Drives Wireless Innovation with Xelento

beyerdynamic, one of the world's leading manufacturers of headphones, microphones and conferencing products, announces Xelento, a wireless, in-ear headphone combining outstanding quality and cutting technology to create an exciting musical experience. The Xelento wireless features beyerdynamic's innovative, miniaturized Tesla drivers, aptX HD Bluetooth technology and MOSAYC sound personalization by Mimi Defined.

beyerdynamic's Xelento wireless bridges the gap for convenient on-the-go solutions and sophisticated luxury headphones by creating a single solution to combine two worlds. Xelento's drivers and acoustic design provide uncompromising sound with Bluetooth connectivity to enable comfortable listening in any environment. Xelento's breathtaking Tesla drivers are recognized among audio enthusiasts for their incredible sound, precise impulses, exceptional transparency and acoustic balance ranging from tight bass to detailed highs. Featuring a sleek design, the Xelento wireless is both an exquisite piece of jewelry and an audiophile listening device creating a platinum state for in-ear headphones.
Xelento incorporates MOSAYC sound personalization by Mimi Defined to create a customized listening experience through beyerdynamic's MIY (Make it Yours) app. Listeners can complete a short hearing test to identify the specific characteristics of their ears and adjust the playback to fit the profile. The innovative MOSAYC technology by Mimi Defined restores the faded pieces of the acoustic image to perfect the individual listening experience.

beyerdynamic Xelento wireless supports the Qualcomm aptX HD codec to enable the transmission of 24-bit signals in full resolution, meanwhile, providing the best possible performance of the high-end drivers. Additionally, the Xelento wireless is compatible with aptX and AAC to provide connectivity with every conventional playback device.

To learn more about beyerdynamic, please visit https://north-america.beyerdynamic.com/
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12 Comments on beyerdynamic Drives Wireless Innovation with Xelento

#1
Th3pwn3r
If it's not true wireless I don't see the point.
Posted on Reply
#2
Sp33d Junki3
It is bluetooth. But the price they want is just stoopid.
$1200 ???
Posted on Reply
#3
silentbogo
Sp33d Junki3
It is bluetooth. But the price they want is just stoopid.
$1200 ???
But the frequency response is up to 48kHz, man... If you can't appreciate it, your cat will. :D:D:D

P.S. At least their lame "Audio Jewelery" term did not make it into this press release )))
Posted on Reply
#4
notb
Th3pwn3r
If it's not true wireless I don't see the point.
And "true wireless" would be what?
I mean: if you're already doing the work of creating a new term, why not add a definition? ;-)
Posted on Reply
#6
notb
Kohl Baas
Guess he means that easy-to-loose nonsense apple and the others created with about 2-4 hours of max running time/charge. Where you just have two little piece of whatever to plug in your ear and nothing else.
To be honest I have nothing against these little plugs. Sound quality should be good enough for most and 2-4h battery life is fine (daily you shouldn't use in-ear headphones for longer anyway).
But they're not exactly "more wireless" than these, are they? :-D

It just leads to some MontyPython-like situation where people go to a shop and ask for sour headphones.
Posted on Reply
#7
Th3pwn3r
notb
And "true wireless" would be what?
I mean: if you're already doing the work of creating a new term, why not add a definition? ;-)
It's not exactly a new term but you're being ignorant or coy. True wireless in the sense there is no wire to the signal source or from driver to driver.
Kohl Baas
Guess he means that easy-to-loose nonsense apple and the others created with about 2-4 hours of max running time/charge. Where you just have two little piece of whatever to plug in your ear and nothing else.
If you were ever active, meaning worked out or did any sort of physical labor/activity you'd understand why true wireless is awesome.

The biggest reason to get them is no more cord noise. When you're bouncing around or making an attempt to not be a lazy blob that noise is extremely annoying. Second, my Jabra Elite Sport buds last a good 5 hours, they charge in 15-30 minutes, so there's not many people going to exceed their battery run time before taking a break which gives you a chance to charge them. And lastly the word is LOSE and not loose, it's not that difficult to grasp the difference but I digress because this isn't English class and I certainly don't write perfectly.
Posted on Reply
#8
Kohl Baas
Th3pwn3r
If you were ever active, meaning worked out or did any sort of physical labor/activity you'd understand why true wireless is awesome.

The biggest reason to get them is no more cord noise. When you're bouncing around or making an attempt to not be a lazy blob that noise is extremely annoying. Second, my Jabra Elite Sport buds last a good 5 hours, they charge in 15-30 minutes, so there's not many people going to exceed their battery run time before taking a break which gives you a chance to charge them. And lastly the word is LOSE and not loose, it's not that difficult to grasp the difference but I digress because this isn't English class and I certainly don't write perfectly.
Well I did and still do with my BEO P2. I have an Ety but my problem were not the cord noise but the noises of my own body interfering with the music. I can't listen to it while I hear the shockwaves of my steps through my skeleton or my heart pounding in my ear. It can be my fault for not listening my music louder, but I bougt the Ety for it's superior noise dampening capabilities so I can listen music on the way home without further damaging my hearing. (6 years on old loud russian designed metro was fair enough damage to begin with...) Unfortunately it can not damper noises coming from inside.

I believe your statement, I just didn't had those problems.
Posted on Reply
#9
notb
Th3pwn3r
It's not exactly a new term but you're being ignorant or coy. True wireless in the sense there is no wire to the signal source or from driver to driver.
"True wireless" seems like a sad marketing term. The way our culture defined the word "wireless" makes it a binary qualifier. Why isn't it just called "cordless" or "compact"?
Also, I've noticed you're quite sensitive about English. "True wireless" doesn't disturb you?

Is this kind of headphones wireless in your world?
If you were ever active, meaning worked out or did any sort of physical labor/activity you'd understand why true wireless is awesome.
I don't think I would EVER use wireless in-ear plugs (IEMs) for any kind of physical activity for 2 very good reasons:
1) they do fall out occasionally and in case of my favourite activities (road cycling and hiking) it basically means you have to buy a new pair,
2) I doubt I would feel comfortable with sealed ear during intense training (sweating, moisture).
The biggest reason to get them is no more cord noise.
You're looking for a cure to a problem you've just created. :-D
Microphonics (cord noise) is a big problem of IEMs, but not that significant in other types of headphones.
Moreover, it can actually be fixed (or significantly mitigated) by getting a higher-end product - preferably with braided detachable cord.
Sure, these may be quite expensive, but since you're using Jabra Elite Sport for ~$200 price doesn't seem to be an issue. ;-)

BTW: I quickly went through 3 reviews of the Jabra IEMs you own. They all mention that the fit is very firm and can be painful to some. So yeah, maybe they don't fall out as often as other IEMs (since they're "sporty"), but there is a price and they may not be for everyone.
Posted on Reply
#10
Th3pwn3r
notb
"True wireless" seems like a sad marketing term. The way our culture defined the word "wireless" makes it a binary qualifier. Why isn't it just called "cordless" or "compact"?
Also, I've noticed you're quite sensitive about English. "True wireless" doesn't disturb you?

Is this kind of headphones wireless in your world?



I don't think I would EVER use wireless in-ear plugs (IEMs) for any kind of physical activity for 2 very good reasons:
1) they do fall out occasionally and in case of my favourite activities (road cycling and hiking) it basically means you have to buy a new pair,
2) I doubt I would feel comfortable with sealed ear during intense training (sweating, moisture).

You're looking for a cure to a problem you've just created. :-D
Microphonics (cord noise) is a big problem
Sure, these may be quite expensive, but since you're using Jabra Elite Sport for ~$200 price doesn't seem to be an issue. ;-)

BTW: I quickly went through 3 reviews of the Jabra IEMs you own. They all mention that the fit is very firm and can be painful to some. So yeah, maybe they don't fall out as often as other IEMs (since they're "sporty"), but there is a price and they may not be for everyone.
Are you aware that a cord and a wire are not the same? That's not too important just like most of your post but the other problem with your corded or wired options is that causes a pull from driver to driver which loosens the driver from your ear on top of the normal wiggling and vibration that causes them to fall out. As for the fit of the Jabras, that's not really relevant either because that's going to differ greatly from person to person. At work I've forgotten I even had them in a couple of times. As for your mention of cycling and hiking, as you a professional cyclist that races? I'm not sure how you consider hiking intense , if you said rock climbing I'd buy the story.
Posted on Reply
#11
notb
Th3pwn3r
Are you aware that a cord and a wire are not the same?
Of course. And what you're describing are cordless headphones, i.e. they don't have a bendy, long object sticking out of them.
But they're certainly not wireless. There are a lot of wires inside. So at least the standard definition of "wireless" is holding, i.e. at some point the signal travels without a solid medium.
And how is that language purism going on? You've never noticed the "true wireless" issue, right? I can sense your confusion. :-D
That's not too important just like most of your post but the other problem with your corded or wired options is that causes a pull from driver to driver which loosens the driver from your ear on top of the normal wiggling and vibration that causes them to fall out.
Of course again! The cord will make headphones fall out more frequently. But you don't lose them, do you? The cord saves your money.
I'm sure a headphone fell out of my ear hundreds of times throughout my life. I even ruined a pair this way, because the monitor went straight into a coffee mug.
Even if we assume cordless ones are 10 or 20 times less likely to fall out, where does it leave me? I would have been forced to replace them maybe 10 times by now. And well sounding pair can cost $200 and more - way much than either traditional cord models or bluetooth sets with a central DAC.
As for the fit of the Jabras, that's not really relevant either because that's going to differ greatly from person to person.
How can this not be relevant? It is very important - maybe even more than the objective, universal characteristics. Would you recommend your Jabra to another person based on your experience? And what if he buys them and they hurt?
At work I've forgotten I even had them in a couple of times.
So you've changed sides and now you're giving arguments for them being easy to lose? :)
As for your mention of cycling and hiking, as you a professional cyclist that races?
No, it's just for fitness/fun (and commuting in good weather).
I'm not sure how you consider hiking intense , if you said rock climbing I'd buy the story.
Maybe you're just walking very slowly. But hiking can be as intense as any physical activity if you want it.
Posted on Reply
#12
Mike Chen
Yeah the price tag is high, but the wired version of Xelento (Xelento Remote) actually costs ~1,000 USD on Amazon.
So most of the price comes from the headphone pieces, not the bluetooth part.
As an current owner of Xelento Remote, I do love its sound, and we all know that not everyone will see such price justified.
I'm plugging my Xelento to a cheap-ish Fiio BTR1K now. (In fact the BTR1K sounds better than the more expensive BTR3 to me).
Meanwhile, I'd be interested if Beyer sells the receiver+cable part separately. But I doubt it anyway...
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