Tuesday, August 13th 2019

Caseking Adds Binned Ryzen 3000 CPUs to Its Offerings

Users that don't want to play the silicon lottery game have been using services that offer pre-binned and pre-overclocked chips for a while now. Silicon Lottery is one of the most well known players in this game, but German retailer Caseking is now offering the same for AMD's latest Ryzen 3000 processors. AMD's work on automatic overclocking and boost clocks for their Ryzen chips has rendered manual overclocking almost (read: almost) obsolete, and in some cases it may even be detrimental to the CPU's performance to set a manual overclock that overrides AMD's boost clock algorithm. This is because AMD's boost increases speed on a single core, with subsequent cores being clocked slightly lower according to their capabilities. In effect, this means that manually overclocking all cores to, say, 4.0 GHz can sometimes render lower performance in particular tasks, since the all-core overclock is, by necessity, handicapped by the least-overclockable core.

Caseking's offerings have been pre-overclocked, and are guaranteed to hit stable overclocks at the claimed frequency, thus saving users from getting a "bad" overclocker CPU from AMD. Caseking's offerings have been tested by their own King Mod team and overclocking superstar Roman "der8auer" Hartung, with Prime95 26.6 software being used to test the overclocked chips' stability with a FFT length of 1344 for at least one hour. This practice is backed by a two-year limited warranty on the CPU. Sadly, most CPUs are out of stock at the moment, so keep on checking availability, unless one of the offerings is exactly up your alley.
Sources: Caseking, via Tom's Hardware
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29 Comments on Caseking Adds Binned Ryzen 3000 CPUs to Its Offerings

#1
las
Pay much more to gain 50 MHz, yay
Posted on Reply
#2
londiste
Does this mean you should not buy CPUs from Caseking?
If they are selling binned ones means silicon lottery odds of getting a good one from them from normal stock is squarely against you.
Posted on Reply
#3
Crackong
Nice to know my 3700x worth 449 :)
Posted on Reply
#4
las
londiste, post: 4097536, member: 169790"
Does this mean you should not buy CPUs from Caseking?
If they are selling binned ones means silicon lottery odds of getting a good one from them from normal stock is squarely against you.
Exactly, and most 3000 hit 4.25 anyway
So you are paying 100 euro for 50 MHz, maybe
You will never notice the difference between 4.25 and 4.3
Worst money you will ever spend
Posted on Reply
#5
iO
londiste, post: 4097536, member: 169790"
Does this mean you should not buy CPUs from Caseking?
If they are selling binned ones means silicon lottery odds of getting a good one from them from normal stock is squarely against you.
Only if you buy tray CPUs (which you never should do in the first place) instead of sealed boxed ones.
Also Bad bins usually got to resellers.
Posted on Reply
#7
Fr3ak
londiste, post: 4097536, member: 169790"
Does this mean you should not buy CPUs from Caseking?
If they are selling binned ones means silicon lottery odds of getting a good one from them from normal stock is squarely against you.
You are buying a sealed boxed CPU, how is that supposed to change your odds in any way?
Posted on Reply
#9
GlacierNine
Fr3ak, post: 4097594, member: 45901"
You are buying a sealed boxed CPU, how is that supposed to change your odds in any way?
I buy 200 CPUs.

I put 100 to one side, I bin the others.

70% of the processors I choose to bin, reach above stock clocks and so I sell those at a premium.

That leaves me 30 CPUs that don't go above stock clocks and so I sell those for a small discount as OEM or "Tray" processors. These chips will almost never actually clock highly.

On the other hand, customers buying a Retail Boxed chip have a 70% chance of getting a CPU that will do higher than stock clocks, as long as all 200 processors originally came from the same batch and have the same variations in overall quality.

las, post: 4097595, member: 111974"
HS that's even worse OC potential that I thought then .. I guess AMD did not lie when they said they already maxed the X chips out
So are you not gonna walk back that statement you literally just made where you claimed most 3000 series will hit 4.25?
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#10
yakk
I guess this means AMD's own binning is impressively aggressive and optimal.
Posted on Reply
#11
las
GlacierNine, post: 4097599, member: 174559"
I buy 200 CPUs.

I put 100 to one side, I bin the others.

70% of the processors I choose to bin, reach above stock clocks and so I sell those at a premium.

That leaves me 30 CPUs that don't go above stock clocks and so I sell those for a small discount as OEM or "Tray" processors. These chips will almost never actually clock highly.

On the other hand, customers buying a Retail Boxed chip have a 70% chance of getting a CPU that will do higher than stock clocks, as long as all 200 processors originally came from the same batch and have the same variations in overall quality.


So are you not gonna walk back that statement you literally just made where you claimed most 3000 series will hit 4.25?
I have been mostly looking at their 6C and 8C CPU's tbh, I have no need or interrest in 12C chips, looks like they clock worse then.
Posted on Reply
#12
GlacierNine
las, post: 4097612, member: 111974"
I have been mostly looking at their 6C and 8C CPU's tbh, I have no need or interrest in 12C chips, looks like they clock worse then.
Most indications are that they clock worse because the overall silicon quality is lower. I have not seen a single review of any Ryzen chip where the reviewer managed to hit 4.4GHz regardless of the number of cores. 4.3 is the upper limit without exotic cooling.
Posted on Reply
#13
las
GlacierNine, post: 4097616, member: 174559"
Most indications are that they clock worse because the overall silicon quality is lower. I have not seen a single review of any Ryzen chip where the reviewer managed to hit 4.4GHz regardless of the number of cores. 4.3 is the upper limit without exotic cooling.
Yes in most reviews they hit 4.1 and 4.2, very few 4.3 and I'm not even sure they tested for stability in depth. Looks like most just used Ryzen Master and ran a few benches at that speed.

There's a huge difference between bench stable and rock solid and this takes days, sometimes weeks to find out.
Posted on Reply
#14
Fr3ak
GlacierNine, post: 4097599, member: 174559"
I buy 200 CPUs.

I put 100 to one side, I bin the others.

70% of the processors I choose to bin, reach above stock clocks and so I sell those at a premium.

That leaves me 30 CPUs that don't go above stock clocks and so I sell those for a small discount as OEM or "Tray" processors. These chips will almost never actually clock highly.

On the other hand, customers buying a Retail Boxed chip have a 70% chance of getting a CPU that will do higher than stock clocks, as long as all 200 processors originally came from the same batch and have the same variations in overall quality.
Thanks for a confirming in the most complicated way, that those 100 CPUs you put on the side, have the same odds of being good overclockers or not. The 30% you sell as OEM/Tray most likely end up in systems that were never meant to be overclocked, so there is no harm done for anyone buying a new boxed CPU that is sealed.

My 3600 is somewhat of a "dud", but I partly blame Gigabyte's horrific AX370 BIOS implementation for that. With ~1.4V 4.3GHz Cinebench stable, 4.2GHz anything Gaming, 4.175 GHz video encoding, 4.1GHz Prime stable (under water with 960mm radiators for CPU + a 1080). Therefore, I take any OC claims from random people in the internets with a grain of salt.
Posted on Reply
#15
GlacierNine
Fr3ak, post: 4097633, member: 45901"
Thanks for a confirming in the most complicated way, that those 100 CPUs you put on the side, have the same odds of being good overclockers or not. The 30% you sell as OEM/Tray most likely end up in systems that were never meant to be overclocked, so there is no harm done for anyone buying a new boxed CPU that is sealed.

My 3600 is somewhat of a "dud", but I partly blame Gigabyte's horrific AX370 BIOS implementation for that. With ~1.4V 4.3GHz Cinebench stable, 4.2GHz anything Gaming, 4.175 GHz video encoding, 4.1GHz Prime stable (under water with 960mm radiators for CPU + a 1080). Therefore, I take any OC claims from random people in the internets with a grain of salt.
The odds of getting a high overclocking CPU from the OEM/tray processors that have had the majority of the high clockers removed, are substantially lower than the odds of getting a high clocking CPU from a batch that has not been binned at all.

If you don't understand that, or if you somehow think anything I just said is "complicated", then frankly you should be embarrassed for yourself.
Posted on Reply
#16
Fr3ak
You randomly take 100 CPUs out of your 200 CPU pile, bin 100 and don't touch the other 100. The odds for a customer buying from the 100 untouched ones don't change compared to buying from 200 untouched ones. All of the 200 could be overly good overclockers or totally bad ones. It is not like AMD just produces 200 at once and send all of them to a single reseller.
Posted on Reply
#17
GlacierNine
Fr3ak, post: 4097657, member: 45901"
You randomly take 100 CPUs out of your 200 CPU pile, bin 100 and don't touch the other 100. The odds for a customer buying from the 100 untouched ones don't change compared to buying from 200 untouched ones. All of the 200 could be overly good overclockers or totally bad ones. It is not like AMD just produces 200 at once and send all of them to a single reseller.
You do realise retailers buy *all* of their CPUs as retail parts, right?

They then unbox a bunch of them to put into prebuilt rigs with warrantied overclocks, or to bin and sell as guaranteed overclockers.

The CPUs that *fail to meet those standards* are what is then sold later as OEM or "Tray" chips. This is because they cannot be sold as retail chips again once they have been opened and tested, so instead the retailer applies a small discount and just gets them out of the door as "OEM" parts.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheLaughingMan
Non-exotic overclocking for AMD Ryzen is dead. Just let it go. Let the chip do its thing and manage the OC as needed like it was designed to do. The minor gains in those 2 apps is not worth the hassle.
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#19
Midland Dog
stable for at least 1 hour pfffft probs crashes at the 6 hour mark id bet
Posted on Reply
#20
TheMadDutchDude
Not likely... your CPU has already hit maximum load as far as temperature and stress goes. There's no real reason for it to crash beyond that.
Posted on Reply
#21
Midland Dog
TheMadDutchDude, post: 4097745, member: 185664"
Not likely... your CPU has already hit maximum load as far as temperature and stress goes. There's no real reason for it to crash beyond that.
pfffffffttttttt 1 hour p95 stable crashed while playing back 8k youtube vids, if it aint 12 hour stable it aint stable
Posted on Reply
#22
R-T-B
las, post: 4097535, member: 111974"
Pay much more to gain 50 MHz, yay
People delid for the same reason, honestly... and sometimes pay for it with a whole CPU... lol.

Midland Dog, post: 4097748, member: 168254"
pfffffffttttttt 1 hour p95 stable crashed while playing back 8k youtube vids, if it aint 12 hour stable it aint stable
12 hour? You noob. It has to run forever.
Posted on Reply
#23
Hotobu
R-T-B, post: 4097840, member: 41983"
People delid for the same reason, honestly... and sometimes pay for it with a whole CPU... lol.



12 hour? You noob. It has to run forever.
Isn't deliding more about thermals with a performance boost being secondary?
Posted on Reply
#24
Chloe Price
R-T-B, post: 4097840, member: 41983"
People delid for the same reason, honestly... and sometimes pay for it with a whole CPU... lol.
For me, getting lower temps was the main thing when I had Intel CPUs with bubblegum under the IHS. Of course they OC'd a little more since the temps were lower. 7700K from 4.9GHz to 5.1GHz for example, and still had lower thermals than before delidding.
Posted on Reply
#25
las
R-T-B, post: 4097840, member: 41983"
People delid for the same reason, honestly... and sometimes pay for it with a whole CPU... lol.
You have to be retarded to mess up a chip because of delidding and delidding typically means +200-400 MHz, not 50 MHz

The last chip I delidded, a 8700K, went from 4.9 to 5.3 because temp spiked pre-delid.
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