Friday, August 23rd 2019

Apacer Unveils its First XR-DIMM DRAM Module with RTCA DO-160G Certification

Apacer, the leading manufacturer of industrial-grade memory, announces the release of the XR-DIMM. This rugged memory module is the first on the market to meet the exacting standards of the US RTCA DO-160G test, an aviation equipment certification that marks the XR-DIMM as resistant to high levels of vibration and therefore ideal for defense and aeronautical applications.

Since 2018, Apacer has been manufacturing DDR4 XR-DIMM modules with rugged stability in mind. Though previous models have been compliant with MIL-STD-810G, this new module is the first to be proven compliant with the US RTCA DO-160G standard, making it the ideal choice for manufacturers who need reliable operation through extreme vibration and shock.
Many defense, rail transit and in-vehicle systems worldwide still rely on standard memory modules. However, forward-looking manufacturers know Apacer's XR-DIMM modules offer significant improvements on reliability, with additions including 300-pin connectors and mounting holes to keep components in place. This allows the XR-DIMM to remain steady even when vehicles encounter uneven roads, powerful winds, or violent waves and to deliver stable performance.

As a well-established manufacturer in Taiwan, Apacer benefits from access to a booming aviation industry. According to Taiwan's Ministry of Economic Affairs, the total output value of Taiwan's aviation industry grew 11% in 2018 to almost US$4 billion. The 2019 Taipei International Aerospace and Defense Industry Exhibition also reported a record number of exhibitors and booths this year. Aerospace and defense manufacturers from Taiwan and from the rest of the world look to Apacer to create cutting-edge DRAM modules and SSDs. The XR-DIMM module with RTCA DO-160G certification is just the latest in a long line of Apacer innovations in this field. For more information, visit this page.
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10 Comments on Apacer Unveils its First XR-DIMM DRAM Module with RTCA DO-160G Certification

#1
Zareek
Sweet! I can finally upgrade the RAM on my F-22. I wish, kinda... This is one application I would actually rather see them use soldered RAM in. Socketed anything seems like a bad idea in aerospace, heck transportation in general.
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#2
Wavetrex
Zareek, post: 4103093, member: 187034"
use soldered RAM in. Socketed anything seems like a bad idea in aerospace, heck transportation in general.
So if the software gets bigger due to updates, new features or added security checks, it will stop working as it runs out of memory ? Can't put more if soldered ...
Or what if that RAM fails for whatever reason and needs replacing ?

No, soldered is not a good idea anywhere, it basically requires replacing an entire computer for just one component that is insufficient or failed.
And those computers are usually extremely difficult to disassemble, as they are deeply embedded into the machine (airplane, car, etc.)

So much simpler just to open the service panel and replace the memory, or CPU, or whatever needs replacing...
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#3
Ferrum Master
Wavetrex, post: 4103117, member: 182738"
No, soldered is not a good idea anywhere, it basically requires replacing an entire computer for just one component
Exactly this is done everywhere, nobody does bitch about fixing a component in a module in mission critical machine, because there is no time, clock is ticking, especially if that thing is weather sealed. Whole module gets replaced, sent to the warehouse/repair branch, where specialists look at it. Then it could be anything, even IC replacement, it doesn't matter there.

For automotive/marine? For some least critical entertainment devices, could be...
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#4
tabascosauz
Wavetrex, post: 4103117, member: 182738"
So if the software gets bigger due to updates, new features or added security checks, it will stop working as it runs out of memory ? Can't put more if soldered ...
Or what if that RAM fails for whatever reason and needs replacing ?

No, soldered is not a good idea anywhere, it basically requires replacing an entire computer for just one component that is insufficient or failed.
And those computers are usually extremely difficult to disassemble, as they are deeply embedded into the machine (airplane, car, etc.)

So much simpler just to open the service panel and replace the memory, or CPU, or whatever needs replacing...
Not how it works in mission critical areas like aerospace and defense. Exhaustive reliability and dependability while being subjected to wartime environments and the elements trumps everything else.

Defence is almost always a step behind, and for good reason. Sure, COTS-based projects for things like logistics vehicles or a cost-effective missile or drone program are in vogue as of late and always nice to keep costs down, and those might involve mass-market computing (a few generations out of date, no less), but you'll never see those components touch the core systems most crucial to the functioning of a Navy surface combatant, for example.

Could see this have a place in rail, but again, are any of these industries forgoing reliability in favour of upgradeability?
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#5
Mistral
Zareek, post: 4103093, member: 187034"
Sweet! I can finally upgrade the RAM on my F-22...
Sorry, it's only compatible with the F-35... You have to upgrade your platform.
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#6
king of swag187
So to my understanding, these are just DDR4 modules in a different package? So if people were to do a adapter (like those quirky SODIMM to DIMM adapters) it would just work? Or is there something special about these aside from the actual design of the PCB/Socket?
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#7
Zareek
Wavetrex, post: 4103117, member: 182738"
So if the software gets bigger due to updates, new features or added security checks, it will stop working as it runs out of memory ? Can't put more if soldered ...
Or what if that RAM fails for whatever reason and needs replacing ?

No, soldered is not a good idea anywhere, it basically requires replacing an entire computer for just one component that is insufficient or failed.
And those computers are usually extremely difficult to disassemble, as they are deeply embedded into the machine (airplane, car, etc.)

So much simpler just to open the service panel and replace the memory, or CPU, or whatever needs replacing...
Like everyone has already said, you replace the entire compute module. Governments and large corporations are not worried about replacing $10,000 compute modules in $30,000,000 aircraft. They burn that much in fuel in a few hours of flight. This type of product might have a role in rail or automated road vehicles. I can definitely see it being used in industrial applications as well.
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#8
Wavetrex
When it's a car, a bus or a train coach or something like that, the person or company operating it doesn't have infinite money like governments and military.
Modern vehicles are connected to the internetz.... for example some DB (Deutsche Bahn) coaches have small LCD displays above the seats that show if one is reserved, initials of the person that reserved it and until what station. Removes the confusion of "is this seat taken?".
In the Netherlands, buses have computers that are GPS enabled and show your current location, what are the next stations, and an ETA until you need to get off the bus. Very handy especially if it's not your common route.

For all these companies, the contrary, anything that can help them save costs and reduce the downtime due to computer malfunctions.
Having to replace the entire damn computer (which is probably difficult to access) just because one RAM chip failed can get very costly.
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#9
Zareek
Wavetrex, post: 4104060, member: 182738"
When it's a car, a bus or a train coach or something like that, the person or company operating it doesn't have infinite money like governments and military.
Modern vehicles are connected to the internetz.... for example some DB (Deutsche Bahn) coaches have small LCD displays above the seats that show if one is reserved, initials of the person that reserved it and until what station. Removes the confusion of "is this seat taken?".
In the Netherlands, buses have computers that are GPS enabled and show your current location, what are the next stations, and an ETA until you need to get off the bus. Very handy especially if it's not your common route.

For all these companies, the contrary, anything that can help them save costs and reduce the downtime due to computer malfunctions.
Having to replace the entire damn computer (which is probably difficult to access) just because one RAM chip failed can get very costly.
Sure that makes sense... Those aren't mission critical. Even the infotainment displays commercial aircraft have in the back of the headrests could possibly benefit from this sort of thing. Just not in a flight control computer or for the bus in some sort of collision mitigation system.
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#10
gamefoo21
Mistral, post: 4103192, member: 49446"
Sorry, it's only compatible with the F-35... You have to upgrade your platform.
Kind like upgrading from a Phenom II X6 to an FX8xxx...

Upgrade in a few ways and a real downgrade in most...

LoL
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