Friday, October 11th 2019

Intel Discontinues Omni-Path Enabled Xeon Processors

Intel's Omni-Path technology has been used primarily in high performance computing market, in order to provide high speed interconnect between Intel Xeon CPUs, with speeds reaching around 100 Gbps. Accompanied by different design and system integration that Omni-Path uses, it was a bit difficult to integrate into server system, while not adding much value that other technologies couldn't match or beat.

Because of these reasons, Intel is now discontinuing its last product capable of utilizing Omni-Path - the first generation Xeon Scalable CPUs. Carrying the suffix "F", these CPUs had an extra connector sticking out of CPU's PCB to enable the Omni-Path functionality (see images bellow). There were eight CPUs manufactured in total that had this extra feature, consisting out of two Xeon Platinum and six Xeon Gold CPUs, which have now reached end of life. Intel states that focus from these CPUs has shifted to other technologies like silicon photonics, which provides much greater speed reaching 100s of gigabits per second. Intel already demonstrated transceivers capable of reaching 400 Gb/s speeds with the magic of light, which will become available in 1H 2020.
Source: HotHardware(Images), Tom's Hardware
Add your own comment

6 Comments on Intel Discontinues Omni-Path Enabled Xeon Processors

#1
biffzinker
Wonder how long until Intel gives up on Optane DIMMS?
Posted on Reply
#2
TheLostSwede
This must've been one of the worst physical interfaces ever created though...
Posted on Reply
#3
AleksandarK
TheLostSwede, post: 4131300, member: 3382"
This must've been one of the worst physical interfaces ever created though...

I very much agree. It would be better if they just routed it through the socked instead of it requiring a separate connector.
Posted on Reply
#4
IceShroom
Why discontinued??? Those thing are EOL'ed not discontinued.
Posted on Reply
#5
Mike Chen
The idea's actually good, but in overall Omnipath just can't compete with Mellanox Infiniband.
(Used Infiniband for more than 10 years, from 20Gb/s to 100Gb/s)
Posted on Reply
#6
notb
Mike Chen, post: 4131670, member: 185079"
The idea's actually good, but in overall Omnipath just can't compete with Mellanox Infiniband.
Even if slower than Infiniband, Omnipath is good enough for most systems.
And Intel is not leaving this business (like they did with 5G modems). They simply slash Omnipath to focus on other technologies.
(Used Infiniband for more than 10 years, from 20Gb/s to 100Gb/s)
You work for Mellanox and you advertise their products? What's the point of this comment? :o
Posted on Reply