Monday, October 28th 2019

Razer Announces Tartarus Pro Keypad with Analog Optical Switches

Razer, the leading global lifestyle brand for gamers, today announced the Razer Tartarus Pro. The newest member of Razer's renowned Tartarus keypad family is the first keypad fitted with analog optical switches designed to provide gamers with superior control in games. The Tartarus Pro is equipped with Razer Analog Optical Switches, enabling the keypad to measure how deep each key is pressed. This allows the Tartarus Pro to emulate analog input similar to controller thumbsticks. Additionally, gamers can adjust the actuation point between 1.5 mm for a faster keystroke, or up to 3.6 mm for a deeper, and more deliberate press.

At the heart of the Razer Analog Optical Switches, an infrared light beam passes through switch stem, while a sensor measures the depth of the switch based on how much light passes through. As such, the switches can register scaling levels of input in the same keystroke. This lets advanced users take advantage of dual-function keys to bind two functions to each key - one that triggers on a partial keystroke, and another on a full keystroke. With dual-function keys, the Razer Tartarus Pro can help ease complex key presses and level up the gaming experience by adapting to the user's playstyle and requirement.
"The Razer Analog Optical Switches advance the keyboard input technology landscape," says Alvin Cheung, Senior Vice President of Razer's Peripherals Business Unit. "The Razer Tartarus Pro opens up various possibilities, such as a greater degree of movement control in FPS and racing games, by introducing analog input previously only available on gamepads to an interface more familiar to PC gamers."

The Tartarus Pro has 32 programmable keys including an eight-way directional thumbpad, which can be assigned for navigation or other commands unique to the user's requirements. The eight quick-toggle profiles allow users to swap between settings or skill loadouts efficiently via a side button that changes profile instantaneously.

A customizable alternative to any keyboard, the analog input from the Tartarus Pro is compatible with all gamepad-supported games without the need for integration.
  • Razer Analog Optical Switches
  • 32 fully programmable keys
  • Secondary function for each key
  • Chroma backlighting with 16.8 million customizable color options
  • Programmable 8-way directional thumb-pad
  • Instantaneous switching between 8 key maps
  • Unlimited macro lengths
  • Razer Synapse enabled
  • Braided fiber cable
  • Unlimited customizable profiles via Razer Synapse
MSRP: $129.99 USD / 149.99€ MSRP
Razer.com - October 24, 2019
Japan - October 24, 2019 for Black and Mercury
Rest of the world - October 24, 2019 for Black; December 2019 for Mercury

For more information, visit the product page.
Add your own comment

10 Comments on Razer Announces Tartarus Pro Keypad with Analog Optical Switches

#1
Robert Bourgoin
I currently use the Nostromo N5 keypad from Belkin that Razor purchased, they totally messed it up with having the make you use that Synapse software rather than just leaving it alone as the N52 doesn't need it, you control through your computer and memory.
Took a great thing and made it terrible to use in games when it does what it wants not what you want, Tried two Razor keypads and the software ruined it. I;ll stick with my N52. If it;s not broke don;t fix it.
Posted on Reply
#2
pathfindercod
Robert Bourgoin
I currently use the Nostromo N5 keypad from Belkin that Razor purchased, they totally messed it up with having the make you use that Synapse software rather than just leaving it alone as the N52 doesn't need it, you control through your computer and memory.
Took a great thing and made it terrible to use in games when it does what it wants not what you want, Tried two Razor keypads and the software ruined it. I;ll stick with my N52. If it;s not broke don;t fix it.
exactly! I bought a couple n52’s as spares when they were on clearance. I refuse to use “cloud based drivers”...
Posted on Reply
#3
Octavean
pathfindercod
exactly! I bought a couple n52’s as spares when they were on clearance. I refuse to use “cloud based drivers”...
Same here, I must have about three n52 models and about two or three of the n50.
Posted on Reply
#4
danbert2000
Analog keys are cool and all, but I can't help but think that it's an imperfect solution when the real solution is to just add an analog stick. I guess I'm just not as into keyboards for gaming, but my ideal controller setup would be more like a left joycon for movement and a mouse for aiming and shooting. I just think that relying on key position with the usual WASD cluster is not going to be as precise as a good ol' analog stick.
Posted on Reply
#5
Octavean
danbert2000
Analog keys are cool and all, but I can't help but think that it's an imperfect solution when the real solution is to just add an analog stick. I guess I'm just not as into keyboards for gaming, but my ideal controller setup would be more like a left joycon for movement and a mouse for aiming and shooting. I just think that relying on key position with the usual WASD cluster is not going to be as precise as a good ol' analog stick.
People tend to get used to one thing or another fairly readily. Once locked into a style of gameplay they are reluctant to chance because doing so is outside of their comfort zone and could cause a temporary decline in performance during the learning curve.

When switching from keyboard to the n50 speed Pad I used the thumb stick for movement. It was awkward at first but I got used to it. Unfortunately I kept breaking the thumb stick because I guess I was too rough with them so I eventually I switched to using the keys on the n50 for movement (which are setup as WASD by default without software).

after a while of using the n50 and later n52 keys for movement there really didn’t seem to be much of an advantage to using the the n50 / n52 unless you wanted to use macros or didn’t have a gaming friendly keyboard to begin with. So I went back to keyboard only.
Posted on Reply
#6
Kovoet
There software has to be the most unreliable. It's such a pity as the actual gamepad I found quite good. But there synapse is useless
Posted on Reply
#7
MrBulos
Robert Bourgoin
I currently use the Nostromo N5 keypad from Belkin that Razor purchased, they totally messed it up with having the make you use that Synapse software rather than just leaving it alone as the N52 doesn't need it, you control through your computer and memory.
Took a great thing and made it terrible to use in games when it does what it wants not what you want, Tried two Razor keypads and the software ruined it. I;ll stick with my N52. If it;s not broke don;t fix it.
What do you mean with soft issue?
I had an Orbweaver Chroma and never had soft-related issues, I had other problems though.
Besides with this Tartarus Pro coming out for 150€ don't you think that the product would come with greater structure quality? No built-in memory but to me it doesn't matter much, it's the kind of thing I only use once, when setting up my device.
Posted on Reply
#8
Kovoet
Synapse with me has been a absolute nightmare. It would work for like a couple of weeks and then one day just stop working. Hate there software. As I said I like the actual product though, just the software.
Posted on Reply
#9
MrBulos
Do you own the Tartarus Pro? I'm looking for feedbacks before I consider the product
Posted on Reply