Thursday, January 2nd 2020

Intel's Frost Canyon NUC 10 Mini PC is now Available

Intel's latest NUC (Next Unit of Computing) series of Mini PCs, based on the 10th generation of Intel "Core" processors, is now available for purchase. Dubbed Frost Canyon, this NUC series is featuring Intel's 10th generation Comet Lake CPUs at its base. All of the available configurations are based around the Intel Core i7-10710U processor, Intel i219-V Gigabit Lan, Bluetooth 5.0 and Intel WiFi 6 AX200 networking module. Configurations are varying by the amount of pre-installed RAM and storage and the option of whatever you want OS pre-installed or not.

The NUC 10 supports up to 64 GB of DDR4 memory, while the storage options include space for one 2.5 inch SSD/HDD in smaller variants or two 2.5 inch SSD/HDD drives in taller variants, with one NVMe M.2 SSD slot available in both versions. Pricing starts at $679 for the base models, while higher-end configurations cost upward of $1,295. Additionally, it is worth pointing out that all CPUs inside the new NUC are configured to run at 25 W of TPD, regardless of the model. This will result in higher performance compared to 15 W versions of processors found in most laptop solutions.
Source: Tom's Hardware
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25 Comments on Intel's Frost Canyon NUC 10 Mini PC is now Available

#1
notb
And that's how office desktops die.

The $1200 config is just sick. So somehow they've managed to put 64GB of RAM in that, while Dell and Lenovo are unlikely to offer more than 32GB in mini towers...
Posted on Reply
#2
ncrs
notb
And that's how office desktops die.

The $1200 config is just sick. So somehow they've managed to put 64GB of RAM in that, while Dell and Lenovo are unlikely to offer more than 32GB in mini towers...
Doesn't it have more to do with the new 32GB SO-DIMM modules being finally available in meaningful quantities? Dell OptiPlex 7070 Ultra is available in a 2x32GB configuration. Most likely the
"10th gen" (still 14nm lol) OptiPlex Micro will have that option too.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheGuruStud
notb
And that's how office desktops die.

The $1200 config is just sick. So somehow they've managed to put 64GB of RAM in that, while Dell and Lenovo are unlikely to offer more than 32GB in mini towers...
I'm pretty sure dummy terminals are how office desktops die. That's what are being installed, today.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheinsanegamerN
Serious graphics downgrade from 8th gen NUCs. Knock another $300 off the price for that alone.

notb
And that's how office desktops die.

The $1200 config is just sick. So somehow they've managed to put 64GB of RAM in that, while Dell and Lenovo are unlikely to offer more than 32GB in mini towers...
This is how office desktops die....with an office desktop? LOL.
Posted on Reply
#5
notb
TheinsanegamerN
Serious graphics downgrade from 8th gen NUCs. Knock another $300 off the price for that alone.
You mean the Iris models? They were meant to provide some entry-level gaming capabilities. It didn't really work.
It's better this way, with Intel focusing on casual and professional clients. IGP in this is perfectly capable for such.
Ice Lake offers a batter IGP (offering higher resolution), but that needs 10nm.
This is how office desktops die....with an office desktop? LOL.
Well, this is not a mobile PC, but does it make it a desktop? These NUCs are in a slightly different category.

The important part is that the large noisy boxes are finally disappearing. :)
TheGuruStud
I'm pretty sure dummy terminals are how office desktops die. That's what are being installed, today.
Not really. Intel is already positioning these NUCs for edge computing, which is the natural evolution of cloud that you're referring to. That's the idea that will dominate the next decade (together with things like oneAPI).
Posted on Reply
#6
ShurikN
TheinsanegamerN
This is how office desktops die....with an overpriced office desktop? LOL.
Fixed that for ya ;)
Posted on Reply
#7
notb
ShurikN
Fixed that for ya ;)
Overpriced because? You have to show a cheaper alternative to state that this one costs too much. :)

Even when buying for personal use and considering a DIY mITX, you'll pay around $900 (assuming a decent case, like In-Win Chopin, and something like 3400G/i5-9400).
That would still result in a PC 5x larger and much heavier, so you'll miss on the main selling point of these NUCs: they don't take up space. And that makes them a bargain.
Posted on Reply
#8
Steevo
TheinsanegamerN
Serious graphics downgrade from 8th gen NUCs. Knock another $300 off the price for that alone.


This is how office desktops die....with an office desktop? LOL.
My
Thin clients.
Posted on Reply
#9
GlacierNine
notb
Overpriced because? You have to show a cheaper alternative to state that this one costs too much. :)

Even when buying for personal use and considering a DIY mITX, you'll pay around $900 (assuming a decent case, like In-Win Chopin, and something like 3400G/i5-9400).
That would still result in a PC 5x larger and much heavier, so you'll miss on the main selling point of these NUCs: they don't take up space. And that makes them a bargain.
My office right now has examples of large and small PCs. The box I'm using right now is still substantially more powerful than the NUC style computers most of my colleagues are using, despite being a 3rd Gen i5.

You'll say that most people don't need extra power and would rather trade off for size, but honestly, I have more desk space than they do because the machine sits on the floor, and while they don't complain about needing extra power, they *do* complain about being unable to do things, slowdown, random hangs while the machines catch up, etc. I use their machines and find plenty of ways in which they make the basic office tasks they're doing, more difficult than they need to be as a result of a lack of horsepower. And again, all of their machines are several years newer than this one, which was not a monster machine when it was first installed either.

It's not that they wouldn't benefit from the extra power a larger machine will have almost by default - it's that they're the kind of people who are content to keep struggling with an inefficient system because that's less scary than moving to an efficient one.

It may well be the way things are going, but I daresay this is because in most offices, the people buying hardware are simply cheaping out and buying short-lived, easily replacable solutions, rather than investing in hardware that can remain in situ for longer without requiring replacement.
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#10
Cheeseball
Intel Core i7-10710U? More HD/UHD 620 then. :(

Not sure why they're not dropping Iris Plus Graphics 640/655 into these 10th gens (aside from the G* series).
Posted on Reply
#11
TheGuruStud
Cheeseball
Intel Core i7-10710U? More HD/UHD 620 then. :(

Not sure why they're not dropping Iris Plus Graphics 640/655 into these 10th gens (aside from the G* series).
If you're dumb enough to buy it, then you're dumb enough to be happy with trash hardware. Easy money.

I know a fruit company that does the same thing...
Posted on Reply
#12
notb
Cheeseball
Intel Core i7-10710U? More HD/UHD 620 then. :(

Not sure why they're not dropping Iris Plus Graphics 640/655 into these 10th gens (aside from the G* series).
Because it's not needed in the segment they're aiming with these SoCs. It's not for gaming on IGP.
Iris would make these chips much bigger.
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
Seriously Intel? $1300? Hardcore pass! Not even for $680... For that kind of money it has to have impressive specs, which it doesn't.

It is for this reason I think that some of the folks at Intel have lost touch with reality, it's customer base or both. :kookoo::rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#14
candle_86
notb
And that's how office desktops die.

The $1200 config is just sick. So somehow they've managed to put 64GB of RAM in that, while Dell and Lenovo are unlikely to offer more than 32GB in mini towers...
No it's not, the normal desktop isn't going anywhere. I've dealt with nucs in an Enterprise environment, they are tempormental and easily stolen.

The nucs purpose is htpc or conference rooms, they work great mounted to a wall running teams or playing media.
Posted on Reply
#15
R0H1T
Yup office desktops won't die at the hands of wannabe "mobile" desktop replacements. If anything it's the laptops that need to be worried about these, especially for people who use external displays.
Posted on Reply
#16
notb
lexluthermiester
Seriously Intel? $1300? Hardcore pass! Not even for $680...
$680 is less than parts cost. So it's not Intel who lost touch with reality...
candle_86
No it's not, the normal desktop isn't going anywhere.
It's almost gone already.
I've dealt with nucs in an Enterprise environment, they are tempormental and easily stolen.
What kind of "enterprise environment" are you talking about? Your colleagues at work steal company's PCs? WTF?
Posted on Reply
#17
candle_86
notb
$680 is less than parts cost. So it's not Intel who lost touch with reality...

It's almost gone already.

What kind of "enterprise environment" are you talking about? Your colleagues at work steal company's PCs? WTF?
you'd be surprised what "disappears", as for desktops disappearing no not in a lot of area's. Complex Math workstations, call center systems, basically anyone that doesn't need a laptop should get a desktop because they are cheaper than laptops, and yes they don't "disappear" as easily. The nuc though you could literly slip into a coat pocket and walk out the door and no one would notice until the next day.
Posted on Reply
#18
lexluthermiester
notb
$680 is less than parts cost.
That is absolutely false. I can build a much more capable system in a similar form-factor for 2/3 that cost, less if I use parts that perform on a similar level.
notb
It's almost gone already.
Also absolutely false...
notb
So it's not Intel who lost touch with reality...
Hmm... :wtf:
Posted on Reply
#19
notb
lexluthermiester
That is absolutely false. I can build a much more capable system in a similar form-factor for 2/3 that cost, less if I use parts that perform on a similar level.
I doubt that. Show me. New parts only, no seasonal deals.

You'd need around $800 to build a similar system using basic mITX case, mobo and a $200 desktop 35W SoC.
Windows 10 Pro OEM is ~$140.

10710U is not available in retail. I have no idea how much it costs. Intel's "recommended" price (whatever it means here) is $443.
800+140+243 = 1183
Intel asks $1295, so it's very much in line with normal OEM margin (if not smaller).

I'm not saying this has great value compared to a DIY mITX. But the price is adequate, expected.

Also, mITX isn't really a "similar form-factor". It's just the closest thing easily done with DIY x86.
Posted on Reply
#20
lexluthermiester
notb
I doubt that. Show me. New parts only, no seasonal deals.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16856158066
https://www.newegg.com/zotac-zbox-mi526-u/p/N82E16883218071
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16856158065
https://www.newegg.com/gigabyte-brix-gb-bri7-8550-bw/p/N82E16856164116
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16856501025
The above only need ram and a drive and you're off and running.
https://www.newegg.com/hp-prodesk-405-g4-6vc52ut-aba-business-desktops-workstations/p/N82E16883997233
This one is on par with the NUC spec wise and is a faction of the cost.
https://www.newegg.com/p/1VK-0053-00315
And for $680 this one is far more appealing.
notb
Windows 10 Pro OEM is ~$140.
An OEM copy of 10 Pro is not $140 for manufacturers. It's not even that for resellers.
notb
So it's not Intel who lost touch with reality...
Very true :kookoo:
Posted on Reply
#21
notb
lexluthermiester
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16856158066
https://www.newegg.com/zotac-zbox-mi526-u/p/N82E16883218071
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16856158066
All of these are way slower than 10710U and probably none of them will accept 32GB modules.
You're a PC builder. You should know better. Don't give up so easily. :)
https://www.newegg.com/hp-prodesk-405-g4-6vc52ut-aba-business-desktops-workstations/p/N82E16883997233
This one is on par with the NUC spec wise and is a faction of the cost.
Much larger, small RAM, small SSD. It's even worse than the mini stuff listed above.
2400GE is really slow for 35W. It's far from bad, but 10710U is much better in single-core. It'll be more responsive.

Anyway, adding RAM and SSD space will move it to the $800 I've mentioned earlier. But yeah, Windows Pro is "free" here.
An OEM copy of 10 Pro is not $140 for manufacturers. It's not even that for resellers.
We're not talking about how much Intel pays for thousands of keys.
You said you can make something better for 2/3 of the price. So I'm asking how you'd make it. Single piece. :)

Proper System Builder license is $143 on Amazon at the moment:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B00ZSHDJ4O/
Posted on Reply
#22
lexluthermiester
notb
All of these are way slower than 10710U and probably none of them will accept 32GB modules.
You're a PC builder. You should know better. Don't give up so easily. :)

Much larger, small RAM, small SSD. It's even worse than the mini stuff listed above.
Adding RAM and SSD space will move it to the $800 I've mentioned earlier. But yeah, Windows Pro is "free" here.

We're not talking about how much Intel pays for thousands of keys.
You said you can make something better for 2/3 of the price. So I'm asking how you'd make it. Single piece. :)
So you're going to pick nits? You asked for examples, they were provided. This is one of the reasons I generally tell people Google is their friend, it's because they then nit pick at minor details that don't matter.
notb
Proper System Builder license is $143 on Amazon at the moment:
Amazon.com: Buying Choices: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit System Builder OEM
That is the price to the public. Amazon does not pay $143 and neither does Intel. Stop being a troll.
Posted on Reply
#23
notb
lexluthermiester
So you're going to pick nits? You asked for examples, they were provided.
"pick nits"?
You said:
[ICODE]I can build a much more capable system in a similar form-factor for 2/3 that cost [/ICODE]
Systems you mentioned are either much slower (N5000, seriously? :D) or much larger (HP ProDesk).

You came into this thread storming, but having absolutely no idea how much NUCs cost.

You've just added a link to the MSI Cubi, which costs $780 with a VERY SLOW Pentium N5000, 16GB RAM and a SATA 1TB SSD
https://www.newegg.com/p/1VK-0053-002U0
The Intel NUC 10 has 64GB RAM, NVMe 1TB and a SoC that's at least few times faster.
N5000 will be unresponsible running Windows 10. It's not a general use PC.
That is the price to the public. Amazon does not pay $143 and neither does Intel. Stop being a troll.
Irrelevant. You said you can build something equivalent for $680. And you're not running a multibillion company. You don't have access to licensing deals Intel has.

Yes, Intel can get a Win 10 Pro license for $50, maybe less. But that $100 difference is not to be given away. It's their profit for running this business. That's the whole point.
Posted on Reply
#24
lexluthermiester
notb
"pick nits"?
Yes
notb
The Intel NUC 10 has 64GB RAM, NVMe 1TB and a SoC that's at least few times faster.
Citation? That is likely to be the $1300 version.
notb
You came into this thread storming, but having absolutely no idea how much NUCs cost.
Storming? Hardly. I was offering criticism not aimed at you, yet you seemed to have taken it personally.
Posted on Reply
#25
candle_86
you realize the one with the i7 isn't the one that costs $680 right?
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