Friday, May 22nd 2020

Intel Tiger Lake Processor Spotted with Boost of 5 GHz

Intel is preparing to launch its next-generation Tiger Lake lineup of processors for the middle of 2020. The processors are based on the new "Willow Cove" CPU core, which supposedly brings even more IPC gains compared to previous "Golden Cove" CPU cores found in Ice Lake processors. The Tiger Lake lineup will use Intel's advanced 10 nm+ manufacturing process. This alone should bring some gains in frequency compared to the 10 nm Ice Lake processor generation, which was spotting a maximum of 4.1 GHz boost frequency on 28 W TDP model named Core i7-1068NG7. This processor is labeled as the highest-performing Ice Lake parts available today and the best 10 nm products available so far from Intel.

Thanks to the popular hardware leaker Rogame, we have evidence that the gains from 10 nm+ manufacturing process are real and that Tiger Lake will show us an amazing boost frequency of 5 GHz. In the benchmark, an unknown OEM laptop was spotted running the benchmark with a Tiger Lake CPU. This CPU is a 4 core, 8 threaded model with a base frequency of 2.3 GHz and a surprising boost frequency of 5 GHz. This information should, of course, be taken with a grain of salt until we get more information about the Tiger Lake lineup and their specifications.
Intel Tiger Lake Benchmark Report
Source: @_rogame (Twitter)
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25 Comments on Intel Tiger Lake Processor Spotted with Boost of 5 GHz

#1
john_
Maybe Intel will manage to keep the IPC crown even after Zen 3, at least in 4 core laptops.
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#2
Hyderz
i know there are some manufacturing issues with 10nm but wouldn't it be better if the 8th, 9th and 10gen desktop cpu
moved to 10nm. Even though the first batch will have some problems, i think through refinement they would have a better
product overall with better IPC, thermals, power etc. My opinion anyways i didn't follow the 10nm issues that plagued intel.
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#3
R0H1T
john_
Maybe Intel will manage to keep the IPC crown even after Zen 3,
Early rumors suggest zen 3 could be 20% faster (IPC?) than zen2 so I doubt Intel will have much breathing space if at all, also given their abysmal yields at 10nm!
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#4
Vayra86
Tiger Lake might look good but also devolves right back into the same ridiculous focus on turbo over base.

All I see here is they finally managed to shrink 14nm. And what do we get? Yet more Core. Old news on a new node...
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#5
Visualzero
Based on the info I think that's Rocket Lake. Too bad they only will only have max 8 cores. Although the rumor goes that 8 Sunny/Willow Cove cores equal 10 Skylake cores in the number of watts.
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#6
efikkan
R0H1T
Early rumors suggest zen 3 could be 20% faster (IPC?) than zen2 so I doubt Intel will have much breathing space if at all, also given their abysmal yields at 10nm!
Sunny Cove offers 18% IPC gain over Skylake, and while we don't know how much Willow Cove offers on top of that, Zen 3 would have to achieve more than that to take the "IPC crown". While IPC is one of the most important scaling factors, it ultimately comes down to actual performance to the end user.

Yields on 10nm+ are good BTW.
Vayra86
Tiger Lake might look good but also devolves right back into the same ridiculous focus on turbo over base.
Yeah…
Good for short benchmarks, not so good for the user experience. But this is the case for most low-TDP laptop CPUs these days.
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#7
Legacy-ZA
Will it require a new motherboard? :roll:
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#8
Melvis
john_
Maybe Intel will manage to keep the IPC crown even after Zen 3, at least in 4 core laptops.
Keep? They already lost the crown as soon as Zen 2 dropped.

If this is true then next yr might be a very competitive yr for both companies.
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#10
watzupken
I feel this is where people fall into Intel's trap. They have been marketing very high clockspeed, but in reality, this perhaps only happen for a fraction of a second if cooling permits. On my Ice Lake CPU, it says PL 2 (0.33 secs), which I may be wrong, but to hit the boost speed, it is the PL2 power state. The sustained clockspeed for Intel chips over the years have always been in the region of 3Ghz (+/- 10%) in most if not all the laptops based on my own experience. While I am not sure what kind of IPC improvements are we looking at for Tiger Lake, but I don't expect performance to soar with this supposed up to 5Ghz clockspeed. The reason why Renoir is beating Intel's laptop CPU is because, (1) AMD have more cores, and I feel most importantly, (2) the cores sustain a higher clockspeed. Sure it doesn't do crazy boost speed like Intel, but a 1 sec boost cannot hold a candle to a processor that is faster 99% of the time. Its a tortise and the hare story here really.
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#11
AnarchoPrimitiv
R0H1T
Early rumors suggest zen 3 could be 20% faster (IPC?) than zen2 so I doubt Intel will have much breathing space if at all, also given their abysmal yields at 10nm!
That's not all, in addition to the 20% IPC increase, there's also reports of 200-300Mhz clock boosts, and AMD is doubling the amount of cores per CCX (we k ow that the two vs one CCX of the 3100 vs the 3300x resulted in an average performance increase of 12% for the 3300x, which should translate to Zen3. Then there's also reports of a 200+ Mhz increase in the infinity fabric which should result improved memory performance..... There are knowledgeable people who think Zen3 could present a 30+% core for core performance improvement
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#12
ARF
watzupken
I feel this is where people fall into Intel's trap. They have been marketing very high clockspeed...
It's quite possible that is Intel's plan - to leak future CPUs, so more people fall in the trap by buying Comet Lake and Z490 while waiting better CPU upgrades later.
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#14
HenrySomeone
Melvis
Keep? They already lost the crown as soon as Zen 2 dropped.

If this is true then next yr might be a very competitive yr for both companies.
Only in certain synthetic benchmarks, definitely not across the board and especially not in gaming (yes I realize that is more due to crap latencies on Ryzens than anything else, but the fact remains that even at the same clock speed Coffee lake beats Zen 2, therefore we can sort of call it gaming IPC). And yeah, if Tiger Lake will actually boost to full 5 Ghz, then AMD is (once again after only just somewhat closing the gap with their Zen2 laptop parts) completely toasted in the mobile segment where burst performance is the most important...
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#15
Melvis
HenrySomeone
Only in certain synthetic benchmarks, definitely not across the board and especially not in gaming (yes I realize that is more due to crap latencies on Ryzens than anything else, but the fact remains that even at the same clock speed Coffee lake beats Zen 2, therefore we can sort of call it gaming IPC). And yeah, if Tiger Lake will actually boost to full 5 Ghz, then AMD is (once again after only just somewhat closing the gap with their Zen2 laptop parts) completely toasted in the mobile segment where burst performance is the most important...
Thats not how IPC works, your talking about clock speed which isnt IPC and no that isnt a fact Coffee lake doesnt beat Zen 2 at the same clock speed at all! and games doesnt apply, games love the low latency and ring bus architecture that Intel has (and clock speed), but they do not have the IPC crown since Zen 2.
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#16
HenrySomeone
No bud, I am talking about performance at the SAME clock speed which is exactly how IPC works and Ryzens don't pull ahead everywhere (which would mean unanimously higher IPC):
www.techspot.com/article/1876-4ghz-ryzen-3rd-gen-vs-core-i9/
They have a great showing in CineBench yes (due to its favourable nature to team red also quite appropriately called RyzenBench), but you don't do that whole day, do you? Also, since TechSpot (HardwareUnboxed) are leaning quite a bit towards being AMD biased, they convenitently "forgot" to include power figures at said 4 Ghz, since they would be quite surprising...
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#17
Melvis
HenrySomeone
No bud, I am talking about performance at the SAME clock speed which is exactly how IPC works and Ryzens don't pull ahead everywhere (which would mean unanimously higher IPC):
www.techspot.com/article/1876-4ghz-ryzen-3rd-gen-vs-core-i9/
They have a great showing in CineBench yes (due to its favourable nature to team red also quite appropriately called RyzenBench), but you don't do that whole day, do you? Also, since TechSpot (HardwareUnboxed) are leaning quite a bit towards being AMD biased, they convenitently "forgot" to include power figures at said 4 Ghz, since they would be quite surprising...
Ummm No sorry dude that isnt true, pretty much every review on the internet will show you that the IPC of Zen 2 is higher then Intels clock for clock, its actually around 500Mhz in front, Im not sure how you dont know this yet? o.O and Hardware unboxed is a very reliable and truthful youtube channel that show it how it is, they arnt Biased they just give the facts, nothing more.

You can literally look up pretty much any youtube review on Zen 2 vs intel and it will show that the IPC is better on the AMD, the only reason Intel might show a higher single digit score is because of a much higher clock speed eg 5.0GHz vs 4.3Ghz and in games like I said its higher clock speeds and lower latency and the ring bus architecture of Intel CPUs that give them the edge, everything else its AMD and at lower clocks.

Im actually stunned there are people here that still dont know this o_O
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#18
Alexandrus
People here do not know this yet because it is not true and only AMD fanboys believe such nonsense.
Even if it were true, not much of an achievement for AMD, to finally develop an architecture in 2019 that competes with Intel's 2010 architecture, or OK, 2015 update, if you want to get technical.
And it's not good for us, as buyers, in the end.

PS. Also, HardwareUnboxed is not really the most reliable, they are quite biased, not necessarily towards AMD, but rarely have I seen anything truly objective coming from them. They have their likes and dislikes and seem to stick with them in their reviews. Plus, they seem to eat up the pseudo technical marketing stuff without truly understanding it.
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#19
sumludus
Alexandrus
...not much of an achievement for AMD, to finally develop an architecture in 2019 that competes with Intel's 2010 architecture, or OK, 2015 update, if you want to get technical.
Zen 1 was comparable with Haswell, so 2017 AMD was on par with 2013 Intel. Also it's quite an achievement since, as of 2020, Intel themselves has not developed an architecture that competes with what they deployed in 2015.
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#21
Lindatje
john_
Maybe Intel will manage to keep the IPC crown even after Zen 3, at least in 4 core laptops.
ZEN 2 has a better IPC at the moment.
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#22
HenrySomeone
sumludus
Zen 1 was comparable with Haswell, so 2017 AMD was on par with 2013 Intel. Also it's quite an achievement since, as of 2020, Intel themselves has not developed an architecture that competes with what they deployed in 2015.
Zen1's IPC was comparable to Haswell, but the clocks were almost a Ghz lower, so...
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#23
pjl321
@techpowerup @AleksandarK
Ice Lake was based on Sunny Cove not Golden Cove.
Golden Cove is what is coming after Willow Cove (Rocket Lake) and will be in Meteor Lake.
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#24
Hyderz
i wonder how much faster is the 10900k vs 6700k if you put it in equal footing say 4c/8t and same clock speed,
would like to see that benchmark :)
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#25
pjl321
Hyderz
i wonder how much faster is the 10900k vs 6700k if you put it in equal footing say 4c/8t and same clock speed,
would like to see that benchmark :)
It would likely be slower believe it or not because of all the hardware level security vulnerability mitigations.
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