Saturday, May 23rd 2020

Matrox Now Shipping D-Series D1480 Graphics Card

Matrox is pleased to announce that the Matrox D-Series D1480 multi-display graphics card is now shipping. Purpose-built to power next-generation video walls, this new single-slot graphics card supports up to four 4Kp60 DisplayPort monitors and can be combined to drive a high-density-output video wall of up 16 synchronized 4K displays. Along with a rich assortment of video wall software and developer tools, the D1480 card enables OEMs, system integrators, and AV installers to deploy high-performance display walls for a broad range of commercial and critical 24/7 applications, including control rooms, enterprises, industries, government, military, digital signage, broadcast, and more.

Backed by innovative technology and deep industry expertise, D1480 delivers exceptional video and graphics performance on up to four 4K DisplayPort monitors from a single-slot card. OEMs, system integrators, and AV professionals can easily add—and synchronize—displays by framelocking up to four D-Series cards via board-to-board framelock cables. In addition, D1480 offers HDCP support to display copy-protected content, as well as Microsoft DirectX 12, OpenGL 4.5, and OpenCL 1.2 support to run the latest professional applications.

Proven video wall ecosystem
D-Series cards work seamlessly with Matrox's complete video wall portfolio. OEMs and system integrators can pair D1480 with Matrox Mura IPX capture cards to add advanced HDCP functionality to capture and display content-protected sources—including set-top boxes, Blu-ray Disc and media players, and video game consoles. D-Series can also be combined with Matrox QuadHead2Go multi-monitor controllers to create ultra-large-scale configurations of up to 64 x 1920x1080p60 screens.

Custom Control
D-Series includes the robust and field-proven Matrox PowerDesk desktop management software. Users can select from a variety of advanced tools—including stretched or independent desktops, clone mode, pivot, bezel management, edge overlap, and more—to easily configure and customize multi-display setups. The feature-rich Matrox MuraControl video wall management software meanwhile provides users with an intuitive platform to manage video wall sources and layouts either locally or remotely, and in real time. Matrox video wall APIs, SDKs, and libraries are also available for developers and AV installers interested in creating custom control functions and applications.

"The new Matrox D-Series card enables customers to go beyond 'standard' and explore new levels of video wall creativity," said Fadhl Al-Bayaty, business development manager, Matrox. "Video wall designers can now capture and display HDCP sources, run computationally-intensive applications locally, deploy ultra-high-density-output platforms, and much more—all while benefiting from a high-performance, high-reliability video wall architecture."

For more information, visit the product page.
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28 Comments on Matrox Now Shipping D-Series D1480 Graphics Card

#1
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...

The last Matrox card I ever had was a Millennium II, and it was amazing... until 3DFX and nVidia came along and simply destroyed Matrox with their first releases. Matrox could only work in a vacuum, and when other, more competent companies started innovating, Matrox simply did not know what to do, as they simply did not know how to make any kind of technology which could compete... I see it's still the same for them today.

I must admit that it would be interesting to see a review of one of these "state of the art" cards from Matrox.
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#2
hurakura
These cards are not for playing games on them. And about the no innovation part, remember Parhelia, best image quality at the time. It's not all about fps, as it is for some companies.
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#3
Fouquin
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...

The last Matrox card I ever had was a Millennium II, and it was amazing... until 3DFX and nVidia came along and simply destroyed Matrox with their first releases. Matrox could only work in a vacuum, and when other, more competent companies started innovating, Matrox simply did not know what to do, as they simply did not know how to make any kind of technology which could compete... I see it's still the same for them today.

I must admit that it would be interesting to see a review of one of these "state of the art" cards from Matrox.
Matrox caters directly to the video wall and pro display market. They don't make gaming cards, and since 2012 their cards have been licensed chips from other manufacturers starting with AMD and now nVidia. They're well entrenched in their market and their cards are pretty commonly used in airports, digital billboards, and marquees.

For what it's worth the G400 MAX put up decent competition when it launched. Could top the charts in some D3D titles.
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#4
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...
Dont worry. Im sure they'll work more than fine driving multiple monitors in data centers, control rooms & other similar environments. Thats pretty much Matrox's raison d'etre
Posted on Reply
#5
AusWolf
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...
On the other hand, I can't imagine running 16 synchronised 4K displays on a GeForce or Radeon card. Matrox isn't dead, just went on to supply an entirely different market.
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#6
rainzor
I guess these are Pascal based, GP107 maybe?
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#7
hurakura
By the specs Quadro P1000, by the looks P2000.
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#8
AsRock
TPU addict
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...

The last Matrox card I ever had was a Millennium II, and it was amazing... until 3DFX and nVidia came along and simply destroyed Matrox with their first releases. Matrox could only work in a vacuum, and when other, more competent companies started innovating, Matrox simply did not know what to do, as they simply did not know how to make any kind of technology which could compete... I see it's still the same for them today.

I must admit that it would be interesting to see a review of one of these "state of the art" cards from Matrox.
Gotta miss those add on memory modules from back then.
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#9
zlobby
But can it run Crysis?
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#10
mak1skav
Matrox and graphics cards *sniff* that's quite a blast from the past, sweet nostalgic memories :).
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#11
stimpy88
zlobby
But can it run Crysis?
Yes, but you have to take screenshots and turn it into a Powerpoint presentation first. ;-)

I do wonder if these cards could cope with MadVR on more than 1 screen at a time, say playing multiple 4K HDR movies at the same time...
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#12
Jism
stimpy88
I can't imagine how awfully these cards must perform...

The last Matrox card I ever had was a Millennium II, and it was amazing... until 3DFX and nVidia came along and simply destroyed Matrox with their first releases. Matrox could only work in a vacuum, and when other, more competent companies started innovating, Matrox simply did not know what to do, as they simply did not know how to make any kind of technology which could compete... I see it's still the same for them today.

I must admit that it would be interesting to see a review of one of these "state of the art" cards from Matrox.
www.anandtech.com/show/936

One of the last gaming reviews for Matrox. They planned to release the Parhelia II but due to lack of succes on Parhelia 1 it got cancelled.

The Parhelia 1 lacked decent clocks and IPC pretty much. The Radeon 9700 obliterated the Parhelia completely.
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#14
Zareek
I had a Matrox G400 for about 3 days when it launched. I ordered a G400 Max and got sent a G400 non-Max so I returned it, I think I bought a TNT2 Ultra instead.

It was a long time ago and much messier than that. I think the vendor was running some sort of scam because they listed them as Max online and sent a non-Max. When I asked for the right card they claimed it was out of stock and wanted a lot more money to give me the right product despite listing both models in stock on their website.
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#15
Fouquin
Jism
www.anandtech.com/show/936

One of the last gaming reviews for Matrox. They planned to release the Parhelia II but due to lack of succes on Parhelia 1 it got cancelled.

The Parhelia 1 lacked decent clocks and IPC pretty much. The Radeon 9700 obliterated the Parhelia completely.
Parhelia-512 suffered incredible yield issues and hardware bugs. The PHW-C1 revision silicon that shipped first fell far short of its clock target, faulty DDR PHYs lead to frame blanking plus issues with AF, and AGP was reduced to 4x from 8x. The "Parhelia II" is actually the PHF-D2 revision that Matrox quietly released almost two full years later featuring closer to intended final specs with huge leaps forward in stability, maturity, and clock scaling of the silicon. Peak (overclocked) clock delta between C1 and D2 silicon could be more than 100MHz, +50% over what shipped to consumers in 2002.
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#16
Tartaros
>Every single time Matrox releases a professional and industrial grade card
>OHOHOHO SURE THIS THING RUNS GAMES LIKE SHIT

It's the gift that keeps giving
Posted on Reply
#17
Jism
Fouquin
Parhelia-512 suffered incredible yield issues and hardware bugs. The PHW-C1 revision silicon that shipped first fell far short of its clock target, faulty DDR PHYs lead to frame blanking plus issues with AF, and AGP was reduced to 4x from 8x. The "Parhelia II" is actually the PHF-D2 revision that Matrox quietly released almost two full years later featuring closer to intended final specs with huge leaps forward in stability, maturity, and clock scaling of the silicon. Peak (overclocked) clock delta between C1 and D2 silicon could be more than 100MHz, +50% over what shipped to consumers in 2002.
If only they did had a R&D with enough budget; they'd be still in the game today.
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#18
thesmokingman
hurakura
These cards are not for playing games on them. And about the no innovation part, remember Parhelia, best image quality at the time. It's not all about fps, as it is for some companies.
They were pushed to the periphery by competition a long time ago and they've embraced it I guess.
Jism
If only they did had a R&D with enough budget; they'd be still in the game today.
The 80s and 90s computing environment saw a lot of brands disappear. Matrox is lucky they found a niche.
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#19
Chloe Price
Nice to hear that they're still around tho their last consumer card was Parhelia from 2002.
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#20
zlobby
thesmokingman
The 80s and 90s computing environment saw a lot of brands disappear. Matrox is lucky they found a niche.
Survival of the fittest?
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#21
hurakura
zlobby
Survival of the fittest?
more like survival of the sleaziest
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#22
Chloe Price
thesmokingman
The 80s and 90s computing environment saw a lot of brands disappear.
Oh boy the amount of HDD manufacturers back in the day. :D
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#23
bencrutz
Chloe Price
Oh boy the amount of HDD manufacturers back in the day. :D
quantum days?
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#24
thesmokingman
Chloe Price
Oh boy the amount of HDD manufacturers back in the day. :D
Or VGA makers, MB makers, lol dial up cards, and the worst having to setup IRQ jumper/switches. I miss Abit boards.
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#25
beedoo
I also had the Millienium II and the G400. Interestingly, I ordered a MAX version, but the non-max version turned up. When making Matrox aware of the error, they sent me the MAX and told me to keep the non-Max. Happy days!
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