Monday, May 25th 2020

Teledyne e2v Introduces First Radiation-Tolerant DDR4 Memory for Space Applications

Teledyne e2v has announced the DDR4T04G72M - the first radiation-tolerant DDR4 memory chip, featuring a total 4 GB capacity. Currently validated at 2133 MT/s, and targeting to offer 2400MT/s in the near future, this next-generation solution offers ultra-responsive low latency operation, while fitting into a highly compact form factor. Furthermore, high-reliability manufacturing and radiation-tolerant robustness makes it highly suitable for dealing with the rigors of space environments.

With 15 mm x 20 mm x 1.92 mm dimensions, this new space-grade device comprises an array of Micron based memory chips, integrated in a single package. It features a 72-bit bus, where 64 bits are dedicated to data and 8 bits to error correction code (ECC). Radiation tests have been performed on these memory chips and a single event effects (SEE) report is available from Teledyne e2v. In particular, the memory has been demonstrated to be single event latch-up (SEL) free up to 60+ MeV.cm²/mg.
This new space-grade DDR4 memory enables elevated levels of performance, while taking up minimal board real estate - something that is certain to be of value in highly space-constrained, densely-packed satellite designs. It can be used in conjunction with processors and FPGAs having a DDR4 controller, and is in particular embedded on Teledyne e2v Space version of Qormino Common Compute Platform together with a space version of NXP LS1046 quad core processor (QLS1046-4 GB).

The thermally-enhanced packaging technology accelerates heat dissipation, in order to maintain continued operational reliability. Flight Models will be available up to an extended temperature range of -55°C to 125°C. It is compliant with NASA Level 1 (NASA EEE-INST-002 - Section M4 - PEMs) and ECSS Class 1 (ECSS-Q-ST-60-13C).

"The combination of radiation tolerance, rugged construction and small form factor, make this Radiation Tolerant 4 GB DDR4 memory a very appealing solution for integration into space-oriented systems," states Thomas Guillemain, Marketing & Business Development Manager at Teledyne e2V Semiconductors. "This space-grade DDR4 offers the transition path to newer generations of processing devices required by compute intensive space applications".
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15 Comments on Teledyne e2v Introduces First Radiation-Tolerant DDR4 Memory for Space Applications

#1
Nephilim666
perfect for high intensity RGB sticks :roll:
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#2
R-T-B
This makes me want to play Kerbal Space Program again...

Other than that, I can only dream of using stuff like this. And that's probably a good thing.
Nephilim666
perfect for high intensity RGB sticks :roll:
Only if they are using nuclear energy to glow... hey new product idea!
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#3
xkm1948
Can I use this on Mars then?
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#4
jmcslob
I read this thinking Teledyne was the name on Terminator...but it's "Cyberdyne".
I was like oh so this is the beginning of skynet huh?
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#5
R-T-B
xkm1948
Can I use this on Mars then?
I imagine it's for low earth orbit. Mars should be easier than that, given at least some atmosphere is protecting you. You'll need sand shielding and other fun stuff though.
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#6
Vya Domus
R-T-B
I imagine it's for low earth orbit. Mars should be easier than that, given at least some atmosphere is protecting you. You'll need sand shielding and other fun stuff though.
Pretty sure Mars has almost no atmosphere, that's why the little ice that exists there is mostly found underground and not on the surface.

It wouldn't surprise me if the radiation is worse on Mars than in low orbit Earth. Most radiation is deflected by the magnetic field anyway and not the atmosphere which is a lot weaker on Mars.
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#7
El Cinico
R-T-B
I imagine it's for low earth orbit. Mars should be easier than that, given at least some atmosphere is protecting you. You'll need sand shielding and other fun stuff though.
I don't like sand. It's coarse and rough and irritating and it gets everywhere. :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#8
R-T-B
Vya Domus
Pretty sure Mars has almost no atmosphere, that's why the little ice that exists there is mostly found underground and not on the surface.
It has a weak co2 atmosphere. If my space knowledge off the top of my head is right, it's about the 10th of earths density, which is still far more protected I would think than low earth orbit (vacuum). Of course the magnetic field is a factor too and I have no idea there.

There are lots of ices at the poles of Mars but the issue is as far as we know they aren't water ices (they are co2, aka dry ice).
El Cinico
I don't like sand. It's coarse and rough and irritating and it gets everywhere. :shadedshu:
Go home Anakin.
Posted on Reply
#9
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
Coool! Space RAM!o_O
Posted on Reply
#10
hat
Enthusiast
INSTG8R
Coool! Space RAM!o_O
This is nothing new. Plenty of radiation hardened chips are already up there. There's lots of radiation in space, and you can't just send normal chips up there because of that.

The Earth has so many built in protections against natural things that would otherwise just outright kill us. We're shielded from radiation and harmful ultraviolet light, and more. If you're in space, it's open season for all that.
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#11
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
hat
This is nothing new. Plenty of radiation hardened chips are already up there. There's lots of radiation in space, and you can't just send normal chips up there because of that.

The Earth has so many built in protections against natural things that would otherwise just outright kill us. We're shielded from radiation and harmful ultraviolet light, and more. If you're in space, it's open season for all that.
Dude...c’mon I know that...Y so serious? ;)
Posted on Reply
#12
TheinsanegamerN
R-T-B
It has a weak co2 atmosphere. If my space knowledge off the top of my head is right, it's about the 10th of earths density, which is still far more protected I would think than low earth orbit (vacuum). Of course the magnetic field is a factor too and I have no idea there.

There are lots of ices at the poles of Mars but the issue is as far as we know they aren't water ices (they are co2, aka dry ice).



Go home Anakin.
Mars' magnetic field is nearly non-existant. This is why much of mars' atmosphere has been stripped away over time by solar winds, the planet has almost no protection against radiation from the Sun. The atmosphere is too thin to have any real effect on solar radiation.
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#13
Jism
INSTG8R
Dude...c’mon I know that...Y so serious? ;)
He's got a point. Some older rockets that where send to space actually had 8086's and 286's as their main CPU ...

They where however engineer in such a way for full reliability in space, with all the radiation, cold and whatever more.
Posted on Reply
#14
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
Jism
He's got a point. Some older rockets that where send to space actually had 8086's and 286's as their main CPU ...

They where however engineer in such a way for full reliability in space, with all the radiation, cold and whatever more.
Man it was a joke that apparently has gone over peoples heads...:rolleyes:
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#15
R-T-B
hat
This is nothing new.
Actually, it is, just a little. It's the first radiation hardened ddr4 I know of. Most are based on dated platforms.
TheinsanegamerN
Mars' magnetic field is nearly non-existant. This is why much of mars' atmosphere has been stripped away over time by solar winds, the planet has almost no protection against radiation from the Sun. The atmosphere is too thin to have any real effect on solar radiation.
I did admit fully I had no idea how the magnetic field played in and was making asumptions there.

Still, I don't doubt the atmospheric and magnetic field protections are weaker in low earth orbit than normal, the question is how bad mars is in comparison and I'll be frank: I really have no idea.
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