Wednesday, June 3rd 2020

Thermaltake Launches the World's First CPU & Memory AIO Liquid Cooler

Thermaltake, the leading PC DIY premium brand for Cooling, Gaming Gear, and Enthusiast Memory solutions, proudly presents the first-ever product that combines memory and an AIO liquid cooler, the Floe RC360 / RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler. Thermaltake never stops to seek out possibilities to impress our users with a more efficient cooling solution for our memory modules. With the new Floe RC360 / RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler, users can acquire an unparalleled gaming experience.

Floe RC360 / RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler is compatible with TOUGHRAM RC memory modules (Sold separately) and grants further expandability which allows users to equip a high-quality all-in-one cooling system, including a water block, radiator, an ARGB controller, and three high airflow 120 mm fans on the RC360 version and two high airflow 120 mm fans on the RC240 version. Other than that, Floe RC360/RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler can be synchronized with motherboards equipped with 5 V addressable RGB headers such as ASUS Aura Sync, GIGABYTE RGB Fusion, MSI Mystic Light Sync, Biostar VIVID LED DJ and ASRock Polychrome, allowing users to control the lights directly from the motherboards RGB lighting software.
Features of the Floe RC360 / RC240 CPU & Memory AIO Liquid Cooler:
Motherboard RGB Sync Ready
Designed to synchronize with ASUS Aura Sync, GIGABYTE RGB Fusion, MSI Mystic Light Sync, Biostar VIVID LED DJ, and ASRock Polychrome. The Floe RC360 / RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler supports motherboards equipped with 5 V addressable RGB headers, allowing you to control lighting effects directly from the software mentioned above without installing any extra lighting software or controllers.

ARGB Sync Radiator 120 mm Fan
The product is equipped with Thermaltake's 120 mm ARGB Sync Radiator Fan. It features compression blades, hydraulic bearings, and a 16.8 million color LED ring with nine addressable LEDs that are ready to sync with 5 V RGB capable motherboards.

High-Efficiency Radiator
Specially designed with a large surface radiator, Floe RC360/RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler increases heat dissipation.

High-Performance Water Block
The high-performance copper base plate accelerates heat conductivity. The pre-filled coolant reduces any hassle for liquid replenishment. Additionally, the reinforced sleeved cables deliver heavy durability and prevent the tubing from any damage.

Hardware Supported
It can support the latest Intel and AMD CPU and compatible with universal sockets (including Intel LGA 1200).

Memory Water Block Lighting
The waterblock for the memory strips are equipped with four lighting strips, featuring 36 addressable LEDs that allows users to show their RGB lightings.

Compatibility
Floe RC360/RC240 CPU & Memory Liquid Cooler is compatible with TOUGHRAM RC DDR4 Memory Modules - Our modules feature the same quality that customers expect from the TOUGHRAM Memory line. Launching in frequencies of 3,200 MHz, 3,600 MHz, 4,000 MHz, and 4,400 MHz in kits of 8GBx2 modules; users may find a configuration to fit any PC allowing installation capacity of up to 32 GB on mainstream 4-DIMM slots.
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38 Comments on Thermaltake Launches the World's First CPU & Memory AIO Liquid Cooler

#1
kayjay010101
I almost can't think of anything less necessary. Hopefully next we'll see motherboard IO watercooling included in our AIOs!
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#2
lexluthermiester
Does anyone actually need something like this? Total props to TT for doing the engineering and making it work, but who needs to cool their RAM like that?
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#3
aktpu
Wait, is the memory "watercooling" just a copper piece on the top? That's sad
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#4
maxitaxi96
I like the idea, but RAM? Cooling multiple components with one AIO is sensible, but seriously RAM? ID-Cooling made one that includes the GPU imho make so much more sense than RAM... like 4 Sticks of overclocked DDR4 draw maybe around 10 Watts TOPs. That can easily be cooled passively... :confused:
Posted on Reply
#5
dyonoctis
I wish that gpu layout could be more standardized so that cpu+gpu aio could become a thing. If you get a gpu were the vrm are near the I/O, you are out of luck when it comes to after market cooling.
Posted on Reply
#6
Caring1
aktpu
Wait, is the memory "watercooling" just a copper piece on the top? That's sad
Nope, the pump block on the CPU has a copper base plate, the rest is alloy.
Posted on Reply
#7
bonehead123
O...
...m....
......G..........

Next up... submersible mobo's, where your case is a big liquid-filled tank and EVERYTHING is underwater ....:roll:..:eek:..:clap:
Posted on Reply
#8
ebivan
Am I the only one who thinks that a memory module which absolutely tops at 2.5W (over a relatively large surface area) doesn't need any cooling whatsoever?

I always rip off these ugly heatspreaders from modern memory modules, because I use huge CPU coolers with huge fans and often these so called memory cooler are just in the way ;)
Last time I brute-force liberated some trident X from their ugly cover, i ripped off a tiny capacitor from the corner of two modules. Memory worked fine without the caps and without the heatspreader!

Newer had any problem running overclocked memory without any kind of heatspreader. Some air circulation within the case does the trick any time!
Posted on Reply
#9
bonehead123
ebivan
Never had any problem running overclocked memory without any kind of heatspreader. Some air circulation within the case does the trick any time!
^^THIS^^ same here !
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#10
AnarchoPrimitiv
Depending on how the pricing works out, perhaps this could me made to be worthwhile if you were to use the cheapest, green PCB, no heat spreader RAM you can find and cover up its ugly with this? I don't know, just trying to find a silver lining.... With rgb backlighting....
Posted on Reply
#11
Bones
lexluthermiester
Does anyone actually need something like this? Total props to TT for doing the engineering and making it work, but who needs to cool their RAM like that?
Me. :D
Either that or better TBH.

It's actually a nice thing to have and could help extend the life of RAM in some cases too. I don't care for the RBG crap but the functionality itself is nice.
Posted on Reply
#12
Turmania
Seems like a good idea to let people buy their aio and memory from themselves. Clever marketing.
Posted on Reply
#13
ebivan
Bones
Me. :D
Either that or better TBH.

It's actually a nice thing to have and could help extend the life of RAM in some cases too. I don't care for the RBG crap but the functionality itself is nice.
Well, tbh prolonged life from cooler hardware is more in the ballpark of decades. I have an Devils Canyon i5 4690k here, that runs 5ghz on all cores instead of the regular 3.5ghz, its air cooled and has been transcoding videos non stop for 5 years now, running continuously at about 80°C it doesn't throttle, it doesn't stop. I suppose it will just die one day, but not today!

So for normal Hardware, that get warm like 8 hours a day, the prolonged lifespan from better cooling must be in the decade range. And do you think you will be running 10 year old hardware in 10 years?

Just keep your hardware at the point where it won't throttle and runs stable and you're good. Anything more will just produce more noise from cooling for no real purpose. I can only laugh at people that think its necessary to keep their CPU at cosy 60°C at the price of either expansive water cooling or noisy air cooling.
Posted on Reply
#14
Dinnercore
For most users that is actually a RAM-heater. Given how hot the water in these AiO units run when you got a power hungry CPU. The water will be around 40°C and most DDR4 will not even reach 40°C with XMP profiles.
Posted on Reply
#15
claster17
This could be interesting for RAM overclocking with voltages at 1.45+V. Right now I have a fan sitting on the graphics card pointed at the RAM because otherwise it would exceed 60°C.
Posted on Reply
#16
ebivan
claster17
This could be interesting for RAM overclocking with voltages at 1.45+V. Right now I have a fan sitting on the graphics card pointed at the RAM because otherwise it would exceed 60°C.
Guys, memory cooling is a myth!
For example, look at the Datasheet of Samsungs B-Die, it is rated for operating temperatures of 85°C so at your 60°C it's not even close to exceeding that.
www.samsung.com/semiconductor/global.semi/file/resource/2017/11/8G_B_DDR4_Samsung_Spec_Rev2_1_Feb_17-0.pdf
Posted on Reply
#17
claster17
ebivan
For example, look at the Datasheet of Samsungs B-Die, it is rated for operating temperatures of 85°C so at your 60°C it's not even close to exceeding that.
The specsheet only tells you operating temperatures at JEDEC settings. It doesn't tell you that B-die is more stable the closer it is to 20°C.
Posted on Reply
#18
CrAsHnBuRnXp
Literally no one wanted this. This is almost as bad as the RAM fans you could get about 15 years ago. At least then you could get it with blue LEDs for added flair if nothing else. But this...? :confused:
Posted on Reply
#19
Dinnercore
claster17
The specsheet only tells you operating temperatures at JEDEC settings. It doesn't tell you that B-die is more stable the closer it is to 20°C.
Yes BUT as I mentioned the water in an AiO, especially the 240, will be closer to 40°C. That is not cooling the memory, that is heating it up.
Now to add on top of that there will be a delta across the heatsink from the DRAM chip to the point the water is touching.

So the Chip will internally be 50°C already before the top of the heatsink reaches that 40°C. So you only get some kind of cooling effect after 50°C internal DRAM temperature.
You are far better off just cooling it with airflow, which inside the case will likely be around 35°C-40°C and make direct contact to the sides of the module, closer to the DRAM chip which means less deltaT to the point of transfer on the heatsink...
Posted on Reply
#20
claes
This cooler is only compatible with one line of memory, from the many lines they sell, and no others...
Posted on Reply
#21
Bones
ebivan
Well, tbh prolonged life from cooler hardware is more in the ballpark of decades. I have an Devils Canyon i5 4690k here, that runs 5ghz on all cores instead of the regular 3.5ghz, its air cooled and has been transcoding videos non stop for 5 years now, running continuously at about 80°C it doesn't throttle, it doesn't stop. I suppose it will just die one day, but not today!

So for normal Hardware, that get warm like 8 hours a day, the prolonged lifespan from better cooling must be in the decade range. And do you think you will be running 10 year old hardware in 10 years?

Just keep your hardware at the point where it won't throttle and runs stable and you're good. Anything more will just produce more noise from cooling for no real purpose. I can only laugh at people that think its necessary to keep their CPU at cosy 60°C at the price of either expansive water cooling or noisy air cooling.
I understand you're trying to be helpful and it's all good But.....
Obviously in reference to me - you have no clue because THIS is what I do.
Example:
Bones`s wPrime - 1024m score: 4min 29sec 375ms with a Phenom II X3 720 BE
Bones`s SuperPi - 32M score: 9min 47sec 235ms with a FX-9590

I wasn't kidding when I said "Me". ;)

As for how long I'll have it, I've got pieces around the 20 year old mark I still tinker with and setups I could use now as a daily that's at least a decade old.
Posted on Reply
#22
MDWiley
Would've been better if they designed something to cool the CPU and motherboard VRM's, although that's easier said than done.
Posted on Reply
#23
lexluthermiester
Bones
Me. :D
Either that or better TBH.

It's actually a nice thing to have and could help extend the life of RAM in some cases too. I don't care for the RBG crap but the functionality itself is nice.
Seriously? Does your RAM really get hot enough to need liquid cooling?
Posted on Reply
#24
Caring1
MDWiley
Would've been better if they designed something to cool the CPU and motherboard VRM's, although that's easier said than done.
There is an A.I.O. with ancillary, centrifugal fan on the side of the pump block to add air flow, on the market, but I can't find it now.
I don't think the fan is large enough to be effective though.
Posted on Reply
#25
Mamya3084
Unbelievable, not even configured for HDETPCs...
Posted on Reply
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