Tuesday, June 23rd 2020

Microsoft Defender ATP is now Available for Linux

It is known that Microsoft has been working on bringing its Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) on non-Windows platforms, and it finally has happened. Today, Microsoft is enabling users of popular Linux distributions to use its Defender ATP locally. This is an important announcement as Microsoft is bringing even more software to the Linux ecosystem. With this, Microsoft is making Defender ATP the software tool to manage and monitor security on all enterprise platforms available - Windows, Windows Server, macOS, and now even Linux. Supported distributions include RHEL 7.2 or higher, CentOS Linux 7.2 or higher, Ubuntu 16 LTS or higher LTS, SLES 12 or higher, Debian 9 or higher, and Oracle Linux 7.2.
Microsoft Defender ATP for Linux
Source: Microsoft
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17 Comments on Microsoft Defender ATP is now Available for Linux

#1
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
Some wont like this just because it has the MS badge on it but I welcome this along with the kernel and other code updates they contribute.

In my opinion more AV solutions for linux is a plus no matter how you slice it. Security, Media, Business. All the big software groups need to reach a certain level of usability for the masses to adopt.
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#2
bug
So... is this like "here's an anti-virus, cause we're bringing our software to your platform"?
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#3
lexluthermiester
So wait, Microsoft makes Windows look/feel like childish garbage and now they're setting their sights on Linux? What utter twatness is this? Bad juju...

Thanks, but no Thanks Microsoft...
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#4
demian_vi
bugSo... is this like "here's an anti-virus, cause we're bringing our software to your platform"?
This is mainly for enterprises that want to monitor their Linux fleet in the cloud, it's not just an antivirus. It's very helpful to use the same tool across different cloud providers for all your Linux VMs like you can do for Windows.
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#5
bug
demian_viThis is mainly for enterprises that want to monitor their Linux fleet in the cloud, it's not just an antivirus. It's very helpful to use the same tool across different cloud providers for all your Linux VMs like you can do for Windows.
You mean it's for those IT guys that swear a machine cannot be managed in the absence of AD? :P
Cause I'm pretty sure the cloud could not have taken off if machines couldn't be monitored, considering everything that's not Azure runs Linux.
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#6
Camm
bugfor those IT guys that swear a machine cannot be managed in the absence of AD?
But its a lot freaking easier. Nix* directory service options are a joke. Also insert *nix snowflakes saying they don't have to comply with the Enterprise security strategy.
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#7
zlobby
Microsoft are slowly porting the entire Windows to Linux. Basically, another distro but with subscription model for updates and support.
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#8
R-T-B
CammBut its a lot freaking easier. Nix* directory service options are a joke. Also insert *nix snowflakes saying they don't have to comply with the Enterprise security strategy.
I'm a proud *nix snowflake, and no one says this. That said, basically every directory service option on Nix depends on Samba's LDAP, which is really just emulating MS, so you aren't completely wrong.
zlobbyMicrosoft are slowly porting the entire Windows to Linux. Basically, another distro but with subscription model for updates and support.
More like Microsoft is porting Linux into windows, from the latest developments.
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#9
bug
CammBut its a lot freaking easier. Nix* directory service options are a joke. Also insert *nix snowflakes saying they don't have to comply with the Enterprise security strategy.
It comes down to whether you want to make life easy for IT support or, you know, the guys actually getting work done in your company. IT support usually wins simply because nobody cares to ask the other side.
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#10
tydowave
Spyware, beware!

Very true, with each new update, more Linux codes are implemented. They can see that if they do not integrate with Linux they will be obsolete in a few years since more and more businesses are using Linux
zlobbyMicrosoft are slowly porting the entire Windows to Linux. Basically, another distro but with subscription model for updates and support.
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#11
demian_vi
bugYou mean it's for those IT guys that swear a machine cannot be managed in the absence of AD? :p
Cause I'm pretty sure the cloud could not have taken off if machines couldn't be monitored, considering everything that's not Azure runs Linux.
Its for those SRE guys that dont want to have 4 different tools to monitor security ( 1 for windows and 3 for linux in each major cloud provider) when they can have just 1 :rockout:

Not everything is linux by the way, a lot of companies like mine use cloud based windows vms for users.
And its not about lack of monitoring, its about using and managing a single tool to monitor security specifically across everything and everywhere.
You can actually login to linux machines in azure using AD btw
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#12
remixedcat
zlobbyMicrosoft are slowly porting the entire Windows to Linux. Basically, another distro but with subscription model for updates and support.
Just like thier "browser" that's just a chrome skin... lol.

Microsoft is donning more skin suits.

I smell money laundering these days... what new stuff have they been actually making themselves.... seems more and more of a laundering scheme to hide bill's "eccentric" endavors...
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#13
ThrashZone
remixedcatJust like thier "browser" that's just a chrome skin... lol.

Microsoft is donning more skin suits.

I smell money laundering these days... what new stuff have they been actually making themselves.... seems more and more of a laundering scheme to hide bill's "eccentric" endavors...
Hi,
I'd be inclined to use chredge before googles any day.
Both ctrl+t opens tabs behind the original so I'll stick with firefox.
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#14
lexluthermiester
ThrashZoneI'd be inclined to use chredge before googles any day.
That's just silly when you can easily use Chromium. What's the difference you ask? Chrome has extra, proprietary and non-open-source code injected into it. Chromium does not and yet you lose very little in functionality.
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#15
bug
lexluthermiesterThat's just silly when you can easily use Chromium. What's the difference you ask? Chrome has extra, proprietary and non-open-source code injected into it. Chromium does not and yet you lose very little in functionality.
May I add Vivaldi, if you want to support the guy that actually innovates in the browser market?
Though I admit, Firefox is still my first choice.
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#16
lexluthermiester
bugThough I admit, Firefox is still my first choice.
Same here.
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#17
demian_vi
remixedcatJust like thier "browser" that's just a chrome skin... lol.

Microsoft is donning more skin suits.

I smell money laundering these days... what new stuff have they been actually making themselves.... seems more and more of a laundering scheme to hide bill's "eccentric" endavors...
Edge is not a chrome skin, its a chromium fork and Microsoft has made at least 2000 commits to chromium
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