Friday, July 3rd 2020

QNAP Launches High-Speed TS-431X3 Quad-core NAS with 10GbE SFP+ and 2.5GbE

QNAP Systems, Inc., a leading computing, networking and storage solution innovator, today launched the quad-core 1.7 GHz TS-431X3 NAS. Featuring 10 GbE SFP+ and 2.5 GbE RJ45 connectivity, the TS-431X3 enables businesses to deploy a high-speed network environment to meet data backup, recovery, and virtualized storage needs.

The TS-431X3 is powered by a quad-core 1.70 GHz processor, 4 GB RAM (upgradable to 8 GB), and features a 10 GbE SFP+ port to provide high bandwidth for intensive data transmission. Coupled with a QNAP QSW series switch, users can build a 10 GbE network environment to enjoy higher transfer speeds and deploy containerized applications. The TS-431X3 also features a 2.5 GbE port for low-latency file sharing and team collaboration. The TS-431X3 comes with tool-less and lockable drive bays, simplifying drive installation and ensuring that drives are safe and secure.
"Providing both 10 GbE SFP+ and 2.5 GbE RJ45 connectivity, the TS-431X3 allows the flexible allocation of network resources to maximize storage usage and facilitate faster backup/disaster recovery. By supporting up to 8 GB memory, users can also run a wide range of containerized apps on the TS-431X3, ensuring a highly cost-effective solution for business IT environments," said Jason Hsu, Product Manager of QNAP.

The TS-431X3 supports snapshot technology and the HBS app facilitates backup to local, off-site and cloud storage, allowing users to develop a well-rounded disaster recovery plan. Notification Center allows administrators to centrally manage and monitor system and app event notifications from a single app, while Security Counselor recommends actions and settings to improve NAS security.

Also included with the TS-431X3 are: Surveillance Station allows for building a secure surveillance system; Qsync automatically synchronizes files between NAS, mobile devices and computers; QmailAgent enables centralized management of multiple email accounts; Qfiling automates file organization; and Qsirch quickly finds needed files. Users can also download companion mobile apps to remotely access their NAS to improve work efficiency.

Key Specifications
TS-431X3: Tower model; 4-bay, AnnapurnaLabs AL-314 quad-core 1.7 GHz processor, 4 GB RAM (single memory slot, expandable to 8 GB); hot-swappable 3.5-inch SATA 6 Gbps bays; 1x 10 GbE SFP+ port, 1x 2.5 GbE port and 1x GbE RJ45 port, 3x USB 3.2 Gen 1 (5 Gbps) ports.

The TS-431X3 NAS is now available. For more information, visit the product page.
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10 Comments on QNAP Launches High-Speed TS-431X3 Quad-core NAS with 10GbE SFP+ and 2.5GbE

#1
TheLostSwede
Still waiting for consumer priced 2.5Gbps switches...
Not that I'd want this, but hey...
Posted on Reply
#2
Octavean
Processor is a disappointment.

Annapurna Lapbs Alpine AL-314 4 - Core at 1.7GHz SoC.

If it were an Intel Celeron, i3, i5 or an AMD RyZen that would be something but this is not acceptable.



Posted on Reply
#3
bug
The TS-431X3 also features a 2.5 GbE port for low-latency
Does 2.5Gbps do anything for latency?

Also, the previous model (X2) commanded a $150 premium when going from 2GB to 8GB of RAM...
Posted on Reply
#4
TheLostSwede
bug
Does 2.5Gbps do anything for latency?

Also, the previous model (X2) commanded a $150 premium when going from 2GB to 8GB of RAM...
I highly doubt it, my 10Gbps doesn't do anything for latency, as there are so many other bottlenecks on a network...
Octavean
Processor is a disappointment.

Annapurna Lapbs Alpine AL-314 4 - Core at 1.7GHz SoC.

If it were an Intel Celeron, i3, i5 or an AMD RyZen that would be something but this is not acceptable.
The Annapurna chips are getting very long in the tooth by now, it's a Cortex-A17 design. It seems like they have nothing new for this market either, as Amazon bought them up and the team has been busy making their server chips instead of low-ish cost NAS SoCs.
Posted on Reply
#5
AnarchoPrimitiv
Why SFP+? I don't get it, if any 10Gbe standard is going to become the consumer norm, it's 10GBase-T because you can't wire your home with DACs, transceiver modules are expensive, and when compared to CAT6a/7/8, wiring your home with SMF/MMF (fiber) is a pain in the butt.

And, while it might have been true years ago, it's no longer the case that SFP+ 10Gbe NICs/Switches are cheaper than 10GBase-T equipment.
TheLostSwede
Still waiting for consumer priced 2.5Gbps switches...
Not that I'd want this, but hey...
Don't hold your breath, many industry insiders don't expect there will be any...and that's why, like I've said before, the addition of 2.5Gbe NICs is purely a marketing ploy and they should have at least upgraded them to 5Gbe (though I personally believe 10GBase-T should be pushed for home consumer use).

As it stands now, if you want to use 2.5Gbe, you need a multigig switch and if you buy a multigig switch, then you might as well utilize its 5Gbe or 10Gbe capabilities. SSDs are ubiquitous now, and SATAIII, despite being essentially dead, still does 6Gbps, so it seems to me that 5gig should be the minimum for wired consumer networking (considering you can now readily buy USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gbps) to 5GBase-T adapters for $50 or under).
Posted on Reply
#6
TheLostSwede
AnarchoPrimitiv
Why SFP+? I don't get it, if any 10Gbe standard is going to become the consumer norm, it's 10GBase-T because you can't wire your home with DACs, transceiver modules are expensive, and when compared to CAT6a/7/8, wiring your home with SMF/MMF (fiber) is a pain in the butt.

And, while it might have been true years ago, it's no longer the case that SFP+ 10Gbe NICs/Switches are cheaper than 10GBase-T equipment.
I can tell you why, it only cost them board traces and a very cheap SFP+ case and connector, as there are no electronics involved in it. The end user then has to either pay for expensive cables or converters...
It gives the manufacturer a nice tick box on the spec sheet, but in reality 99% or more of their customers will never use it.
AnarchoPrimitiv
Don't hold your breath, many industry insiders don't expect there will be any...and that's why, like I've said before, the addition of 2.5Gbe NICs is purely a marketing ploy and they should have at least upgraded them to 5Gbe (though I personally believe 10GBase-T should be pushed for home consumer use).

As it stands now, if you want to use 2.5Gbe, you need a multigig switch and if you buy a multigig switch, then you might as well utilize its 5Gbe or 10Gbe capabilities. SSDs are ubiquitous now, and SATAIII, despite being essentially dead, still does 6Gbps, so it seems to me that 5gig should be the minimum for wired consumer networking (considering you can now readily buy USB 3.2 Gen 2 (10Gbps) to 5GBase-T adapters for $50 or under).
Yeah, that's the thing, although Realtek had a switch IC a couple of years ago for low cost 10Gbps switches even. I guess the issue for 10Gbps is the cost of the PHY's.
For 2.5Gbps that's at least not the case, as the PHY's are less than a dollar per port, so there's no reason we can't get a $200 8-port 2.5Gbps switch, someone just needs to make one...

I think you miss the difference between 2.5Gbps and 5Gbps PHY's. 2.5Gbps PHY's are very similar to 1Gbps PHY's in terms of size, power consumption and price. 5Gbps and 10Gbps PHY's, not so much. And 2.5Gbps is still 2.5x as fast as good old Gigabit Ethernet, so it's not just a marketing ploy, it has real world benefits.
It's still a big difference to add a sub $1 chip to a motherboard, compared to a $20-50 part, which is needed for 5 and 10Gbps, not taking into account the extra heatsink requirements.

Never seen a sub $50 10Gbps anything at retail, care to share a link?
Posted on Reply
#7
Octavean
AnarchoPrimitiv
Why SFP+? I don't get it, if any 10Gbe standard is going to become the consumer norm, it's 10GBase-T because you can't wire your home with DACs, transceiver modules are expensive, and when compared to CAT6a/7/8, wiring your home with SMF/MMF (fiber) is a pain in the butt.

And, while it might have been true years ago, it's no longer the case that SFP+ 10Gbe NICs/Switches are cheaper than 10GBase-T equipment.
Sure 10Base-T is the direction the industry is going in.

However, that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for intermediary options that in some cases can either ease the transition or just lower the cost. SFP+ can certainly be more expensive and not just in $$$ but in heat and power consumption as well. That doesn’t necessarily mean that SFP+ will be more expensive $$$ all the time for each use case though. For a basic (single room) setup SFP+ can easy and cheap. Also many switches may support both rj45 and SFP+ so both can coexist.

In most cases no one would plan their network from the ground up standardizing on SFP+ today but that doesn’t mean it can’t exist in some small segment of an existing one.

I haven’t seen many cheap 10GBase-T switches though. A new 8 port 10GBase-T switch might be something like ~$400 to ~$500 USD. With SFP+, decommissioned enterprise switches not withstanding, a new passively cooled (silent) 8 port SFP+ Switch could cost under ~$250
Posted on Reply
#8
zlobby
Basically, an overpriced 431KX.
Posted on Reply
#9
Owen1982
Hey Synology, look at this! QNAP puts 2.5 AND 10G on it's ARM SMB NASes - you don't go above 1G, even for your mid level Intel SMB Desktop NASes (DS920+ I'm looking at you).
Posted on Reply
#10
Octavean
Owen1982
Hey Synology, look at this! QNAP puts 2.5 AND 10G on it's ARM SMB NASes - you don't go above 1G, even for your mid level Intel SMB Desktop NASes (DS920+ I'm looking at you).
Yeah, Synology has had this annoying habit of forcing the customer to choose between a pair of NVMe SSDs or a 10GbE NIC using a single PCIe expansion slot. Even if you could put dual NVMe SSDs and 10GbE on a single expansion card why force the issue?

Synology needs to make 2.5GbE, 5GbE and 10GbE or some combo therein a standard feature on all but their cheapest models.

I'd also like to see them use at least a Celeron on all but their lowest end models. ARM and Atom SoC units can still be used but if their processing prowess is low then leave them to the entry level.
Posted on Reply