Thursday, September 24th 2020

CORSAIR Launches CX-F RGB Entry Level Power Supply Lineup

CORSAIR today announced the launch of an entry level lineup of power supplies with RGB claims to fame. The new CX-F series is aimed at the entry level market, and is available in 550 W, 650 W and 750 W, thus covering all of the mainstream PSU capacities. The RGB elements are present in the 120 mm fan only, with its 8 LED elements being separately configurable via CORSAIR's own iCue software or by connecting it to one of your motherboards' 5 V ARGB ports. The PSU further features eight distinct colors and nine preset lighting modes. PSU colors are available in black or white across the product range.

All of the PSUs are 80 Plus Bronze certified, with up to 88 % power delivery efficiency, where a single + 12 V rail feeds power to your components. The CX-F series further features a modular cabling design for tidier builds, 105 °C rated Japanese electrolytic capacitors, and has a CORSAIR-backed 5-year warranty. The OEM behind these designs is HEC, and pricing is set at $85 USD for the 550 W variant, $100 for 650 W, and $110 for the 750 W capacity PSU.
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15 Comments on CORSAIR Launches CX-F RGB Entry Level Power Supply Lineup

#1
CrAsHnBuRnXp
God it's about time they release an RGB power supply. Now if only it was higher end...
Posted on Reply
#2
robot zombie
Rgb entry level? Why buy an entry level psu with extra cost tacked on? Isnt entry level all about bang for buck? Doesnt have the fancy bells and whistles but gets the job done well enough?

Its like buying a base model kia with solid alloy wheels. Worrying about the wrong things at that price bracket.
Posted on Reply
#3
tigger
I'm the only one
RGB PSU is a fidiotic idea.
Posted on Reply
#4
Searing
This is about as stupid as you get, over $100 CAD for a bronze supply. Why doesn't Corsair start with fixing all the horrible fans in all their models below the RM series?
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#5
-The_Mask-
It's not really entry level, more like mainstream. It's uses a modern LLC resonant converter design, with synchronous rectification and DC-DC converters.
Posted on Reply
#6
juular
robot zombie
Rgb entry level? Why buy an entry level psu with extra cost tacked on? Isnt entry level all about bang for buck? Doesnt have the fancy bells and whistles but gets the job done well enough?
Tell that to Thermaltake ... Their shit-level Smart RGB PSUs apparently sell like hot cakes, despite being, you know, shit. Granted, 100$ for an entry-level PSU is a bit high even if it's a good entry level PSU but it would find it's auditory.
-The_Mask-
It's not really entry level, more like mainstream. It's uses a modern LLC resonant converter design, with synchronous rectification and DC-DC converters.
Well, by modern standards that's already entry-level if you don't consider dirt-cheap group regulated stuff to be a viable PSU for your average PC build.
Searing
Why doesn't Corsair start with fixing all the horrible fans in all their models below the RM series?
What's up with their horrible fans ?
Posted on Reply
#7
-The_Mask-
juular
Well, by modern standards that's already entry-level if you don't consider dirt-cheap group regulated stuff to be a viable PSU for your average PC build.
Well VS series is entry level, this is clearly quite a step up. And of course there is the utter crap.
Posted on Reply
#8
Caring1
robot zombie
Rgb entry level? Why buy an entry level psu with extra cost tacked on? Isnt entry level all about bang for buck? Doesnt have the fancy bells and whistles but gets the job done well enough?

Its like buying a base model kia with solid alloy wheels. Worrying about the wrong things at that price bracket.
But that's what happens in that price range, people buy what they can afford, but still want it to look good to them.
Posted on Reply
#9
robot zombie
Caring1
But that's what happens in that price range, people buy what they can afford, but still want it to look good to them.
Maybe I just have a different attitude. When I'm looking at something entry level, I don't expect it to look good. If I want something that looks as good as it performs, I spend more on it. Save up a little. Especially in the case of a PSU, where the gold stuff isn't extravagantly more. I'd almost rather the looks be cheaped out on over anything else, honestly.
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#10
jonnyGURU
AAARGH!! Stop calling it entry level! Why does TechPowerUp keep calling it entry level!?!!! It's an LLC with DC to DC with a rifle bearing fan! It's not ENTRY LEVEL!!!!!

Also, the fan in this PSU is really top notch. It's the "Blue Jay" high static pressure used in the RMx and up, but in 120mm with RGB LED's. It's REALLY quiet. The thing that took this PSU so long to go to market is EXACTLY the fan and making sure it was quiet as well as supporting iCUE RGB.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mussels
Moderprator
Of course, this will totally be visible past my PSU shroud
Posted on Reply
#12
ObiFrost
robot zombie
Maybe I just have a different attitude. When I'm looking at something entry level, I don't expect it to look good. If I want something that looks as good as it performs, I spend more on it. Save up a little. Especially in the case of a PSU, where the gold stuff isn't extravagantly more. I'd almost rather the looks be cheaped out on over anything else, honestly.
I guess it comes down to the strength of patience. Saving up for the better parts that last longer is a sensible decision, but not always fortunate, if, say, some parts are out of stock for a good half year or perhaps even more (oftenly happens with continents outside of US), you're either forced to purchase lower end alternatives or overpay for higher end unit that'll be kinda wasted for the intended purposes of use. Contrarily, some just don't care bout verified importance, because it doesn't scream performance increase to them (for instance, wasting high end boards potential when all you do is plug-n-play).
Posted on Reply
#13
Tardian
In my experience for tight MITX case builds a semi-modular PSU is preferable.
Posted on Reply
#14
Mussels
Moderprator
Tardian
In my experience for tight MITX case builds a semi-modular PSU is preferable.
fully modular is a life saver, being able to wire them up at the PC end, route the wires back to the PSU and connect them last

Then again i somehow squeezed a shitty fully hardwired one into my ITX case, now that i'm using it as a secondary PC
Posted on Reply
#15
Athlonite
Mussels
Of course, this will totally be visible past my PSU shroud
My thoughts exactly I couldn't see it in my case with the rgb facing outward to the vent with a dust filter on it it makes no sense
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