Tuesday, November 17th 2020

EVGA Announces the BP Bronze Series Power Supplies

Introducing the EVGA BP power supplies, where precision is power. The EVGA BP power supplies add another affordable option to EVGA's 80 Plus Bronze-certified lineup, while reducing the overall length to 120 mm - EVGA's shortest ATX power supply to-date! The BP power supplies feature a 115 mm hydraulic bearing fan to ensure that staying cool and quiet is no tall order. Combining a full suite of protections and EVGA's 3 Year Limited Warranty, this power supply should be on the short list for your next system build.
Features
  • Short and Silent: The BP Series gives you both extra space at 120 mm long and silence with an HYB fan.
  • Standard ATX Form Factor: Will fit most mATX, EATX, HPTX, and XL-ATX cases.
  • 80 Plus Bronze Efficiency: 80 Plus Bronze certification ensures your power supply isn't wasting power and turning it into excess heat. Under typical load this power supply is 85% efficient or higher.
  • Hard-Lined Design: Hard-Lined design attaches your cables to the power supply for ease of installation and removal. You can be ready to go right out of the box.
  • DC to DC Converter: Voltage step-down for rock-solid power stability and minimal signal noise. (For 3.3 V and 5 V)
  • Hydraulic Bearing Fan: Hydraulic Bearings reduce the wear and tear on a fan's bearings, reduce noise, and feature a longer-lasting life than sleeve bearing fans.
Made to Protect and Serve The EVGA BP Series also includes a full suite of protections (OCP, OVP, UVP, OPP, SCP, OTP) for safety and security. The PSUs are backed by 3-year warranties.

For more information, visit the product page.
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6 Comments on EVGA Announces the BP Bronze Series Power Supplies

#1
MachineLearning
I like that they've added a hydraulic bearing fan as opposed to the sleeve bearing fans that dominate most of their (and most others') lower-end PSUs. I wish every PSU had a ball bearing or hydraulic bearing fan. A sleeve bearing fan is typically the first thing to go in PSUs unless they have absolute shit capacitors (afaik, someone please let me know if I'm incorrect).

But unless these are priced extremely inexpensively, I honestly don't see much of a point in releasing these. Only a 3-year warranty, which matters less in terms of actually using that warranty and more for the faith EVGA has in this product line.

Also, the inexpensive 80+ Bronze PSU market is pretty congested as it is. What makes this more attractive an option over other PSUs in this price bracket (whatever that may be, presumably quite low), including some of EVGA's? Why would it being 120mm in length be a selling point for an ATX PSU? Anyone looking for a small PSU would buy SFX, and probably a more efficient unit to reduce heat output. And I find it genuinely funny that non-modular cables are a "selling point." They should have saved the cost of producing these altogether and focused on increasing supply of their other current units imo. Just confused as to why EVGA bothered to release these.
Posted on Reply
#2
punani
MachineLearning
Just confused as to why EVGA bothered to release these.
R&D dudes gotta do something i guess.
Posted on Reply
#3
blobster21
punani
R&D dudes gotta do something i guess.
They aim for the entry level market, because for each & every gold/platinum/titanium/unobtanium psu they sell, 10 bronze are sold (and the sheer amount make it much more lucrative)
Posted on Reply
#4
MachineLearning
blobster21
They aim for the entry level market, because for each & every gold/platinum/titanium/unobtanium psu they sell, 10 bronze are sold (and the sheer amount make it much more lucrative)
While this is certainly true, would it not save EVGA money as a whole to not release this new product and to instead restock their other bronze units? There's not really a practical reason to purchase this particular PSU over any of their other bronze units - at least as far as I can tell. Idk how this benefits them as a business decision is all
Posted on Reply
#5
ExcuseMeWtf
MachineLearning
I like that they've added a hydraulic bearing fan as opposed to the sleeve bearing fans that dominate most of their (and most others') lower-end PSUs. I wish every PSU had a ball bearing or hydraulic bearing fan. A sleeve bearing fan is typically the first thing to go in PSUs unless they have absolute shit capacitors (afaik, someone please let me know if I'm incorrect).

But unless these are priced extremely inexpensively, I honestly don't see much of a point in releasing these. Only a 3-year warranty, which matters less in terms of actually using that warranty and more for the faith EVGA has in this product line.

Also, the inexpensive 80+ Bronze PSU market is pretty congested as it is. What makes this more attractive an option over other PSUs in this price bracket (whatever that may be, presumably quite low), including some of EVGA's? Why would it being 120mm in length be a selling point for an ATX PSU? Anyone looking for a small PSU would buy SFX, and probably a more efficient unit to reduce heat output. And I find it genuinely funny that non-modular cables are a "selling point." They should have saved the cost of producing these altogether and focused on increasing supply of their other current units imo. Just confused as to why EVGA bothered to release these.
If it's DC-DC and penetrates into decreasing price points, it's good it happened. But I don't think it's the case as EVGA themselves still have N/W series for bottom of the barrel group regulated designs. EVGA's PSU product history is full of pretty redundant releases already.
Posted on Reply
#6
MachineLearning
ExcuseMeWtf
If it's DC-DC and penetrates into decreasing price points, it's good it happened. But I don't think it's the case as EVGA themselves still have N/W series for bottom of the barrel group regulated designs. EVGA's PSU product history is full of pretty redundant releases already.
I'm definitely glad that it's DC-DC at a lower price point. But it's only for the 3.3V and 5V rails, not for the 12V rail - wouldn't 12V DC-DC give a much more tangible benefit than either 3.3V or 5V DC-DC? Or having it be completely DC-DC be better for performance and marketing? Not a PSU expert, genuine question.

As for redundant releases - boy, you've certainly got that right... lol
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