Tuesday, November 24th 2020

Ainex Releases Ingenious GPU Power Cable Hider Adapter

Japanese company Ainex has recently announced an ingenious solution to hide GPU PCI-Express power cables by reversing the orientation of the power cable. The adapters feature a compact size so can be used in parallel for power-intensive devices, the adapters are available in upper and lower latch versions to accommodate all cards. Ainex is offering 4 models for 6 and 8 pin connectors ranging from 600 - 700 yen (~6-7 USD) with shipping starting on November 25. The adapters are unlikely to see an official international release however you can likely import the item or find similar products online.
Product Lineup
Source: Ainex Co., Ltd.
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29 Comments on Ainex Releases Ingenious GPU Power Cable Hider Adapter

#1
Gungar
Funny i have that EXACT same design on my pc. Rebrand, rebrand, ooooh rebrand everywhere.

"we will likely see resellers or copycat products in the coming months" i hope that was sarcasm...
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#2
kayjay010101
Honestly, that black little pad looks 10x worse than a good ol' braided cable.
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#3
Gungar
kayjay010101Honestly, that black little pad looks 10x worse than a good ol' braided cable.
It's for ITX cases where you don't have enough clearance on the side panel.
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#4
Uskompuf
Gungar"we will likely see resellers or copycat products in the coming months" i hope that was sarcasm...
Bad choice of words, updated.
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#6
Caring1
Now make one 3 slots wide facing down, so the cables are out of sight under the GPU and will fit modern cards.
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#7
Chrispy_
I've been using two of those in my HTPC for at least two years; My case was designed for graphics cards that don't violate the ATX expansion card spec so there's very little clearance for the power connectors for graphics cards that are taller than the spec allows, and these days that's most of them.

For what it's worth, I originally found out about them on an overclock.net forum thread from 2015 so they're not exactly "new" or "innovative" and every variant of them I've ever seen looks absolutely identical, right down to the foam backside. This time though, they've sprayed (or photoshopped) the manufacturing markings off the PCB so that you can't just search for them on aliexpress and buy two for $3.

For anyone interested, Google "PH38 adapter"
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#8
Legacy-ZA
I guess they never did temperature tests on the backplates? Those things can get extremely hot, the last thing one needs is a fused wire on GPU backplate creating a short in your system via the PSU. Tears will flow
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#9
Valantar
These have been available on AliExpress, Ebay, Moddiy and various other places for years. I bought a set back in ... 2017, I think? If there's anything new about this, it's someone bothering to package them (and possibly getting the necessary regulatory approvals for sale in Western markets).
Legacy-ZAI guess they never did temperature tests on the backplates? Those things can get extremely hot, the last thing one needs is a fused wire on GPU backplate creating a short in your system via the PSU. Tears will flow
GPU backplates can get hot, but not directly behind the power connector. The heat is focused around the die, VRAM and VRM areas, and unless the backplate has actual heatpipes to disperse the heat it's not going to be more than mildly warm next to the power connectors.
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#10
Legacy-ZA
ValantarThese have been available on AliExpress, Ebay, Moddiy and various other places for years. I bought a set back in ... 2017, I think? If there's anything new about this, it's someone bothering to package them (and possibly getting the necessary regulatory approvals for sale in Western markets).


GPU backplates can get hot, but not directly behind the power connector. The heat is focused around the die, VRAM and VRM areas, and unless the backplate has actual heatpipes to disperse the heat it's not going to be more than mildly warm next to the power connectors.
Depends on the card, I remember my EVGA GTX1070 FTW got so hot on the backplate, you couldn't even touch it for more than 1 second. I remain unconvinced. I suppose it will work great on these new cards though, their FLIR images look magnificent but I doubt it very much on the older cards. :)
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#11
aktpu
I'll pick these up for my Fractal Design Era + RX6800 build for sure
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#12
texas64
Legacy-ZAI guess they never did temperature tests on the backplates? Those things can get extremely hot, the last thing one needs is a fused wire on GPU backplate creating a short in your system via the PSU. Tears will flow
if you have cable jackets melting because of the backplate, you have bigger problems. There's no way that backplate will make any commercial electrical cable melt. [edit: added "melt" doh!]
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#13
Caring1
Legacy-ZAI guess they never did temperature tests on the backplates? Those things can get extremely hot, the last thing one needs is a fused wire on GPU backplate creating a short in your system via the PSU. Tears will flow
A bigger problem is cheaply made bridges in budget versions which can get very hot.
If I had to use one, I'd look for a brand name with a quality build.
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#14
looniam
texas64if you have cable jackets melting because of the backplate, you have bigger problems. There's no way that backplate will make any commercial electrical cable melt. [edit: added "melt" doh!]
well the thing is PSUs don't have commercial electrical cables; unless i can go to home depot and buy one. (how could i have missed that aisle?) insulation on PSU wires can be the least expensive material available. you're thinking outdoor power tools where it ought to be lighting fixtures.

though i'll agree a full melt down is highly unlikely i still wouldn't be surprised if someone gets sticky cables.
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#15
Valantar
looniamwell the thing is PSUs don't have commercial electrical cables; unless i can go to home depot and buy one. (how could i have missed that aisle?) insulation on PSU wires can be the least expensive material available. you're thinking outdoor power tools where it ought to be lighting fixtures.

though i'll agree a full melt down is highly unlikely i still wouldn't be surprised if someone gets sticky cables.
There are still regulations for the thickness and materials used for electrical insulators even in low-voltage device-internal DC circuits, and meeting these requirements is a necessity to be certified for sale in most markets. PVC is indeed "the least expensive material available", but it's an excellent insulator and you don't need a lot of it either. That's why silicon-coated cables for example are much thicker, as silicon is much, much worse at electrical insulation than PVC.
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#16
wiak
funny that they connected the cable wrong :O
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#17
looniam
ValantarThere are still regulations for the thickness and materials used for electrical insulators even in low-voltage device-internal DC circuits, and meeting these requirements is a necessity to be certified for sale in most markets. PVC is indeed "the least expensive material available", but it's an excellent insulator and you don't need a lot of it either. That's why silicon-coated cables for example are much thicker, as silicon is much, much worse at electrical insulation than PVC.
yes even low-voltage device-internal circuits are specificated. for PSUs that would start with intel's ATX power supply design guide along with pci-sig's add in cards specs. as long as the materials used can handle a 30c rise over ambient - its good to go.

go buy a PSU from diablotek (or grab one out of some prebuilt) and then one from super flower, seasonic - almost anyone. then tell me there isn't a difference. and with enough PSUs that don't have proper OCP/OVP on the market; cheap 110c rated insulation isn't hard.
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#18
Valantar
looniamyes even low-voltage device-internal circuits are specificated. for PSUs that would start with intel's ATX power supply design guide along with pci-sig's add in cards specs. as long as the materials used can handle a 30c rise over ambient - its good to go.

go buy a PSU from diablotek (or grab one out of some prebuilt) and then one from super flower, seasonic - almost anyone. then tell me there isn't a difference. and with enough PSUs that don't have proper OCP/OVP on the market; cheap 110c rated insulation isn't hard.
Oh, there are obviously differences in quality - the more expensive stuff is always more flexible (adding more plasticizer to your PVC makes production more complicated, after all), but that doesn't mean the cheap stuff doesn't do what it has to. But even dirt-cheap, no-additives PVC doesn't melt below 100C, and if your backplate gets that hot, you have bigger problems than melting wiring - your GPU is likely on fire at that point.
wiakfunny that they connected the cable wrong :O
Do you mean by using two 8-pins off one cable? Yeah, that's pretty dumb.
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#19
wolar
I wouldn't call this ingenious...
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#20
looniam
ValantarOh, there are obviously differences in quality - the more expensive stuff is always more flexible (adding more plasticizer to your PVC makes production more complicated, after all), but that doesn't mean the cheap stuff doesn't do what it has to. But even dirt-cheap, no-additives PVC doesn't melt below 100C, and if your backplate gets that hot, you have bigger problems than melting wiring - your GPU is likely on fire at that point.
you keep over looking the other polymers which are prevalent on PSU cables and can be cheaply made by taking short cuts in the "recipe". like i said go look at the temp rating and not so much what a specific material "should be" (ie PVC). i sort doubt you've seen too many PSUs if you think they're all PVC cables. you mention "regulations" when its more recommended specifications. if it doesn't pass the specs - it doesn't be certified. BUT believe it or not - there are many PSUs out there that aren't certified (hello CHINA!).

and the hyperbole of "your card's on fire" can stop. i have a 980ti with a temp sensor on the backplate, right by my power connections and it hit 85c+ at stock settings ~1320 @ 1.19v with and stock cooler. i start cranking up the voltage to 1.23 and it starts tapping 95c.

go read some 3090 reviews; those back plates are burning peoples' hands. then start babbling about fires . . . :shadedshu:
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#21
Valantar
looniamyou keep over looking the other polymers which are prevalent on PSU cables and can be cheaply made by taking short cuts in the "recipe". like i said go look at the temp rating and not so much what a specific material "should be" (ie PVC). i sort doubt you've seen too many PSUs if you think they're all PVC cables. you mention "regulations" when its more recommended specifications. if it doesn't pass the specs - it doesn't be certified. BUT believe it or not - there are many PSUs out there that aren't certified (hello CHINA!).

and the hyperbole of "your card's on fire" can stop. i have a 980ti with a temp sensor on the backplate, right by my power connections and it hit 85c+ at stock settings ~1320 @ 1.19v with and stock cooler. i start cranking up the voltage to 1.23 and it starts tapping 95c.

go read some 3090 reviews; those back plates are burning peoples' hands. then start babbling about fires . . . :shadedshu:
A) It should be pretty clear I was specifically talking about products that are approved for sale in Western countries, not unrated ones.
B) 85C is definitely not 100, and if the actual backplate (not the PCB behind it) hits 95C, there is something seriously wrong with that design, as something is clearly not getting the cooling it needs. Even rear-mounted VRM components rated for 125C shouldn't be heating the backplate to temperatures that high. It might not be enough for anything to fail, but it nonetheless sounds like major shortcuts were taken in the design of that GPU.
C) Please learn to take a joke, and maybe chill out a bit?
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#22
looniam
ValantarA) It should be pretty clear I was specifically talking about products that are approved for sale in Western countries, not unrated ones.
B) 85C is definitely not 100, and if the actual backplate (not the PCB behind it) hits 95C, there is something seriously wrong with that design, as something is clearly not getting the cooling it needs. Even rear-mounted VRM components rated for 125C shouldn't be heating the backplate to temperatures that high. It might not be enough for anything to fail, but it nonetheless sounds like major shortcuts were taken in the design of that GPU.
C) Please learn to take a joke, and maybe chill out a bit?
A) mentioning china does not mean exclusively though if you want to frame this conveniently to western countries, then you are not including the U.S. or you no idea what fire hazards that can be bought off the shelf in both PSUs and prebuilts. (or are you now moving the goal posts to DIY only?)

B) no 85 isn't 100 but i did mention 95 which is much closer, eh? and really? did you not know the purpose of a back plate is to act like a heatsink for the VRMs?
news flash:
so if a back plate gets hot thats because its designed as it should. (mine has thermal tape even!)

C) dude, buh, i got so much gas - i'm totally chill. you good?
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#23
R-T-B
If your backplate is really 95C I have a feeling something is really wrong with your card. After acting as a wide area heatsink, there is absolutely no reason for it to be that hot.
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#24
looniam
R-T-BIf your backplate is really 95C I have a feeling something is really wrong with your card. After acting as a wide area heatsink, there is absolutely no reason for it to be that hot.
get an evga 980ti SC+ , mod the bios to 1.27v - enjoy! :D

e:
actually, iirc you've been intimate with my bios . . . :eek:
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#25
Valantar
looniamA) mentioning china does not mean exclusively though if you want to frame this conveniently to western countries, then you are not including the U.S. or you no idea what fire hazards that can be bought off the shelf in both PSUs and prebuilts. (or are you now moving the goal posts to DIY only?)

B) no 85 isn't 100 but i did mention 95 which is much closer, eh? and really? did you not know the purpose of a back plate is to act like a heatsink for the VRMs?
news flash:
so if a back plate gets hot thats because its designed as it should. (mine has thermal tape even!)

C) dude, buh, i got so much gas - i'm totally chill. you good?
As @R-T-B said, if your backplate reaches 95C, there is definitely something that isn't how it should be. It doesn't matter if it's "working" as a heatsink at that point; it is clearly insufficient as a heatsink at that point. 95C surface temperature isn't an indication that it's an efficient heatsink; it's an indication that it's a woefully underperforming heatsink. So, back to my original point (to which you had oh so many complaints about the bit of hyperbole added, so I've left that out - you're welcome): if your backplate is 95C, hot power connectors is the least of your problems. Either a) it gets this hot during stock operation, which means your GPU has a major design flaw and should never have hit the market, and any damage should be covered by warranty - letting any surface reach that temperature is a major burn hazard, even if it's supposed to be used in a case - or b) you're already pushing your GPU way, way, way past what it's originally designed for, in which case you really should have the sense to maybe not use an SFF-focused cable management adapter like this? Those use cases hardly seem compatible whatsoever, and ultimately, if that's the use case and your cables melt, the issue is PEBKAC, not in the design of the adapter.

If your argument is what it seems to be, which is "this is a bad idea if you're massively overvolting your GPU, the GPU has hot VRM components next to the power connector that sink into the backplate, and you're doing all of this with a dirt-cheap PSU with terrible insulation", then you're making far too much of an effort to find a problem. I mean, no, this is obviously not an idiot-proof product. Few PC components are. But your argument here goes way beyond that, into the realm of being completely unrealistic.
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