Wednesday, December 16th 2020

Cezanne Stretches Its Legs: AMD Ryzen 7 5800H System Benchmarked

AMD's Zen 3 core has seen some major performance uplift, with the first products based on it being the 5000 series desktop processors codenamed "Vermeer". With the efficiency that this new core brings and IPC increase, it is only a matter of time before it scales down to mobile processors. Today, thanks to the findings of TUM APISAK, we get to see some performance results of AMD's upcoming Ryzen 7 5800H "Cezanne" processors. Benchmarked in the Geekbench 5 test suite, the CPU was spotted running at the base frequency of 3.20 GHz, and boost frequency of 4.44 GHz. This is only an engineering sample so the real product may have different clock speeds.

The CPU managed to score 1475 points in single-threaded results while having 7630 points in a multi-threaded scenario. If you wonder how does it fare to the last generation that it replaces, the Ryzen 7 4800H scored 1194 points for ST, and 7852 points for MT. That means that the new Ryzen 7 5800H CPU has a 23% performance boost for ST workloads, showing the Zen 3 capability. The MT score is not representative as we do not have the final product yet, so we have to wait and see how it performs when reviews arrive.
Source: TUM_APISAK (Twitter)
Add your own comment

39 Comments on Cezanne Stretches Its Legs: AMD Ryzen 7 5800H System Benchmarked

#1
opteron
Nice 23% performance boost!

I'm looking forward to a new laptop build in 4-6 months after the recent Zen 3 desktop ugrade. ;)
Posted on Reply
#2
nguyen
GG Intel 11th gen mobile CPU whose name even Intel Rep don't want to remember :D
Posted on Reply
#3
dj-electric
Zen3 Mobile + RTX 30 mobile is going to be huge. Don't take my word for it, look at the ambitious designs that will be presented at the non existant CES in 2-3 weeks.
Posted on Reply
#4
Xuper
This mostly comes from 16mb Unified L3 cache.
Posted on Reply
#5
TumbleGeorge
But what MT decreased below results of previous generation? I expected equal or little better MT not worse.
Posted on Reply
#6
Bruno Vieira
TumbleGeorge
But what MT decreased below results of previous generation? I expected equal or little better MT not worse.
Probably the tdp is a lot lower. We have seen on the desktop, zen3 is just better at the same conditions.
Posted on Reply
#7
zlobby
opteron
Nice 23% performance boost!

I'm looking forward to a new laptop build in 4-6 months after the recent Zen 3 desktop ugrade. ;)
We need RDNA too. Vega is simply not on par today.
Posted on Reply
#8
Mats
Xuper
This mostly comes from 16mb Unified L3 cache.
What makes you think that?
Posted on Reply
#9
kapone32
zlobby
We need RDNA too. Vega is simply not on par today.
You mean we need RDNA2 with Smart Access and support for 16 GB Dedicated 4000 MHZ RAM for the IGPU.
Posted on Reply
#10
TumbleGeorge
Bruno Vieira
Probably the tdp is a lot lower. We have seen on the desktop, zen3 is just better at the same conditions.
Results is mobile vs mobile just different generations. TDP is same 45 watts. Frequencies(base and turbo include turbo of all cores) of 5800H is higher than 4800H. Despite these advantages, the result in the multi-threaded test of the new APU is weaker.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mats
zlobby
We need RDNA too. Vega is simply not on par today.
Only for those who actually uses it, tho. A faster PCIe connection for separate GPU's is more important to me. Gaming laptops are probably more profitable, and a much bigger market, than the IGP gaming market. AMD lost a big market by using an anemic PCIe 3 x8 controller for Renoir, which is a shame given that the CPU part was very good. Even if things are going well for AMD now, they still have to make sacrifices.
TumbleGeorge
Results is mobile vs mobile just different generations. TDP is same 45 watts. Frequencies(base and turbo include turbo of all cores) of 5800H is higher than 4800H. Despite these advantages, the result in the multi-threaded test of the new APU is weaker.
It's geekbench, don't trust that one. Also, this is possibly an ES.


WHY is Geekbench always the first benchmark that pops up for a new chip? I know it's supposed to be cross platform, but honestly, who cares that much about it? It's not the FIRST thing you want to know. I bet all of us here in this thread wants to compare it with older AMD and Intel CPU's, first and foremost.
Posted on Reply
#12
kapone32
Mats
Only for those who actually uses it, tho. A faster PCIe connection for separate GPU's is more important to me. Gaming laptops are probably more profitable, and a much bigger market, than the IGP gaming market. AMD lost a big market by using an anemic PCIe 3 x8 controller for Renoir, which is a shame given that the CPU part was very good. Even if things are going well for AMD now, they still have to make sacrifices.
For me if AMD can have the IGPU support even PCIe 4.0x8 with a 1080P 17 or 19 inch freesync touchscreen budget Gaming rig for say $399 US with no discrete Graphics card that will sell like hotcakes. With the proliferation of tech and the Covid economy expensive Gaming laptops don't make as much sense as they used to.
Posted on Reply
#13
TheinsanegamerN
Mats
Only for those who actually uses it, tho. A faster PCIe connection for separate GPU's is more important to me. Gaming laptops are probably more profitable, and a much bigger market, than the IGP gaming market. AMD lost a big market by using an anemic PCIe 3 x8 controller for Renoir, which is a shame given that the CPU part was very good. Even if things are going well for AMD now, they still have to make sacrifices.


It's geekbench, don't trust that one. Also, this is possibly an ES.


WHY is Geekbench always the first benchmark that pops up for a new chip? I know it's supposed to be cross platform, but honestly, who cares that much about it? It's not the FIRST thing you want to know. I bet all of us here in this thread wants to compare it with older AMD and Intel CPU's, first and foremost.
Gamign laptops also overwhelmingly use Intel processors, not AMD. We had a decent selection this year, but the majority are still intel. The powerful iGPU is what set AMD APUs apart from Intel's processors, it's disheatening to see no advancements made on that front. With Rocket lake coming in 2021 with potentially 10% IPC improvements the ryzen CPU alone isnt going to hold forever, and focusing on improving one part of a product while letting other parts go stale is what led to AMD being in the position they were in.
Posted on Reply
#14
Hardware Geek
opteron
Nice 23% performance boost!

I'm looking forward to a new laptop build in 4-6 months after the recent Zen 3 desktop ugrade. ;)
8 core zen 3 may finally get me to pull the trigger on a new laptop. I've wanted one for years but couldn't justify the meager performance increases.
Posted on Reply
#15
Mats
kapone32
For me if AMD can have the IGPU support even PCIe 4.0x8 with a 1080P 17 or 19 inch freesync touchscreen budget Gaming rig for say $399 US with no discrete Graphics card that will sell like hotcakes. With the proliferation of tech and the Covid economy expensive Gaming laptops don't make as much sense as they used to.
Like I said, AMD have to make sacrifices still. They have used ONE die for the whole current APU generation. Throwing in features to cover all bases doesn't seem feasible, as the die size grows larger.
For every IGP gaming laptop sold there are 20 discrete graphics gaming laptops or boring office laptops sold, meaning that the beefier IGP isn't cost effective.

It's not like TSMC can produce all the chips anyway, with Ryzen, Radeon, XBox and PS5, sold out everywhere. With a larger die, cost goes up, yield goes down, and less production capacity for every other product that's on the line. IGP gaming is not prioritised, obviously, since the market is so small and low budget compared to everything else.
Posted on Reply
#16
yotano211
Here is my laptop's score, with i9 9880h, but I gave it some extra undervolt, so maybe delete about 2% from the score.
Posted on Reply
#17
Mats
TheinsanegamerN
Gamign laptops also overwhelmingly use Intel processors, not AMD. We had a decent selection this year, but the majority are still intel. The powerful iGPU is what set AMD APUs apart from Intel's processors,
Maybe you've missed the reviews of Renoir, its CPU is more impressive than IGP, with 15 - 25 W models beating some of Intels 45 W parts in some situations, simply because Intel didn't have the performance advantage on mobile like it did in desktop, their CPU's need too much power for that. AMD had everything that's needed for a premium gaming laptop CPU, EXCEPT for enough PCIe.
Tiger Lake has the faster IGP, last time I checked.
Posted on Reply
#18
zlobby
kapone32
You mean we need RDNA2 with Smart Access and support for 16 GB Dedicated 4000 MHZ RAM for the IGPU.
Actually, yes. And I for one wouldn't mind if finally the whole chip can sustain nominal clocks when the iGPU is in use. Today, CPU goes well below nominal clock when iGPU is used.
Posted on Reply
#19
michwoz
zlobby
We need RDNA too. Vega is simply not on par today.
Remember that with current APU design RDNA will be beneficial mostly for power efficiency, not performance (which is memory limited).
Posted on Reply
#21
kapone32
medi01
Geekbench eh?
Intel 2020 "Benchmarks don't matter"
Posted on Reply
#23
Chrispy_
Nobody cares about H-series - they're high-TDP parts designed for chonkbooks and l33T g4m3r RGBLED laptops that make up about 0.3% of the market.

Look at published sales volumes; People buy 15W parts. 25W at most. When I say "people" I mean like >95% of all laptops sold to all demographics in all regions, period.
Posted on Reply
#24
yotano211
Chrispy_
Nobody cares about H-series - they're high-TDP parts designed for chonkbooks and l33T g4m3r RGBLED laptops that make up about 0.3% of the market.

Look at published sales volumes; People buy 15W parts. 25W at most. When I say "people" I mean like >95% of all laptops sold to all demographics in all regions, period.
They make up small volume sales but profit margins are much higher on higher end laptops with those "h" processors.
Posted on Reply
#25
Punkenjoy
Main issue with AMD laptop parts, is AMD is not able to make enough to really take market share. Intel have the production, people need laptop, and trying to get an AMD laptop with the newest chips is hard.

Intel is still a huge chip maker and is able to produce in volume. TSMC can probably produce very large volumes, but for many customers...
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment