Monday, January 18th 2021

GIGABYTE Launches the AORUS Gen4 7000s M.2 NVMe SSD

Gigabyte Technology, one of the top global manufacturers of motherboards, graphics cards, and hardware solutions, announces today the latest AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD with up to 7 GB/s read speed. Enhanced by the new generation PCIe 4.0 controller with advanced 3D-TLC NAND Flash, it boosts up to 55% more performance than previous generation PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD. AORUS Gen4 7000s SSDs come in two capacity variants, 2 TB and 1 TB with M.2 2280 interface to make installation easy. They equip big aluminium thermal interface in different sizes and double side thermal pad with Nanocarbon coating for improved heat dissipation. Meanwhile, the SSD Tool Box application provides the instant overview and adjustment of SSD status.

"The storage devices are taking advantage of the PCIe 4.0 transfer speed that raised from 5 GB/s to almost 8 GB/s, which is great news for users who expect to optimize storage performance and reduce the bottle neck of system operation." said Jackson Hsu, Director of the GIGABYTE Channel Solutions Product Development Division. "AORUS Gen4 7000s SSDs further advance the standards set by our previous SSD products to provide users with breakthrough performance. After the OS installed, uses can enjoy unprecedented 7 GB/s read speed with 1 TB or 2 TB storage capability. The thermal solution and the double-sided thermal pad are designed to slow down the throttling that might occur at high-speed operation of SSD, thus boost the system performance."
AORUS Gen4 7000s SSDs equip the latest Phison E18 selected 8-channel controller, which provides users with ultimate random access rate, as well as the high speed 3D-TLC NAND Flash and SLC cache design that brings the PCIe 4.0 into full play. Under the real test, AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD features read speed up to 7 GB/s and write speed up to 6.85 GB/s, which is 55% faster than PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD, two times faster than PCIe 3.0 SSD, and up to 13 times faster than SATA SSD. Enhanced by Phison's E18 controller, AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD not only improves AI multitasking operation, but power up content creators, gamers, and users eager for extreme performance.

The high-speed SSD generates heat on full speed operation, and normally thermal throttling is implemented as a safety feature to prevent data loss, or wear-out the memory chips and controllers. The throttling state engages to maintain the stability and durability, however it slows down the performance and it reduces the transfer rate. In order to keep AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD cool while it is running at high speed, GIGABYTE employs the special-designed double-sided aluminium heatsink with Nanocarbon coating. By utilizing the clearance area smartly between slots on motherboards, the size of the thermal fins can be maximized to enlarge the surface area of dissipation. This design can support different M.2 slots perfectly on various motherboards to avoid possible interference by VGA cards installed above the M.2 SSD. AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD also equip high conductivity thermal pad to improve heat dissipation 30% better than metal thermal pad.

For those progressive M.2 users who prefer more extreme thermal solution without installing SSDs between PCIe expansion slots, AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD comes in another version of heatsink with integrated heatpipes. With the same double-sided heat spreader with Nanocabon coating and high conductivity pad design, but optimized on the height and dissipation area, AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD promises the consistent cooling and high performance for those water cooling users to avoid throttling from the overheating caused by no air flow assistance of the CPU fan. Users can customize their thermal allocation according to personal needs by GIGABYTE's thoughtful design, which balances between the high performance and low temperature.

AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD features PCIe 4.0 NVMe M.2 interface design. To release the breakthrough performance of read speed up to 7 GB/s, AMD X570 / B550 motherboards or Intel Z490 motherboards with next-gen Intel Core processors supported are highly-recommended. With GIGABYTE R&D's professional adjustment, comprehensive verification, software enhancement, and the 5 years warranty service, GIGABYTE motherboards offers more stability with higher performance, which is definitely the best choice for users.

For more information, visit the product page.
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37 Comments on GIGABYTE Launches the AORUS Gen4 7000s M.2 NVMe SSD

#2
bonehead123
ZoneDymo
lol at that heatsink
hAHAHAHA, I was about to say the same thing, although the drive itself with the fins looks nice :)
Posted on Reply
#3
1d10t
ZoneDymo
lol at that heatsink
In near future we should see the likes of Noctua and beQuite! design tower cooler just for NVMe
Posted on Reply
#4
bonehead123
1d10t
In near future we should see the likes of Noctua and beQuite! design tower cooler just for NVMe
Oh yea, I've always wanted some of those butt-fuggly brown fans hovering over my m2 drives, hahahahahahahahaha :roll::D:fear:
Posted on Reply
#5
kapone32
1d10t
In near future we should see the likes of Noctua and beQuite! design tower cooler just for NVMe
I actually tried a Alphacool DDR3 water cooler on my NVME. It hung over. If they made 110MM NVME it would fit perfectly.
Posted on Reply
#6
Jism


A yet completely useless, gimmick. SSD's need to run hot; at least within the 60 to 70 degrees mark for best performance.
Posted on Reply
#7
jesdals
Jism


A yet completely useless, gimmick. SSD's need to run hot; at least within the 60 to 70 degrees mark for best performance.
Considering its going to soak heat from the GPU or something else thats proberly not going to be a problem... ;D
Posted on Reply
#8
Jism
jesdals
Considering its going to soak heat from the GPU or something else thats proberly not going to be a problem... ;D
Tell me a workload that will tax the GPU 99% including the SSD running at 99% of it's performance.

Even with a regular heatsink the SSD will be fine.
Posted on Reply
#9
TumbleGeorge
Hmm, average below 64MB/s read small files. No way for instant load game scenes.
Posted on Reply
#10
thegnome
Funny heatsink, but a mobo m.2 heatsink will do just fine. Could probably cool a low end gpu with it lol.
Posted on Reply
#11
lexluthermiester
While the technical achievement is impressive, how practical is a drive like this for users? Even elite gamers don't really need a drive this fast. And with all that voltage and heat, one must question the longevity and durability of such a drive..
Posted on Reply
#12
Kohl Baas
Jism


A yet completely useless, gimmick. SSD's need to run hot; at least within the 60 to 70 degrees mark for best performance.
AFAIK the NAND chips like to be around 60 but the controller itself wants to be under 60. And that thing can hit throttling too. The small aluminum fins is the "solution". It cools the controller while uses it's heat to keep the NAND warm. This monstrocity looks like too much.
Posted on Reply
#13
ThrashZone
Hi,
I like heatsinks but dang that's whack :-)
Posted on Reply
#14
D.Crepit
Funny how nobody seems to want to publish their
TBW ( tera bytes written ) number...
Posted on Reply
#15
Valantar
ZoneDymo
lol at that heatsink
It's a great value add! Buy an SSD, get a compact heatsink for a future SFF build bundled in with it!

Seriously, that thing is significantly bigger than most 15-25W laptop heatsinks. It could probably cool a 35W CPU decently with direct-die mounting.
Posted on Reply
#16
Nater
TumbleGeorge
Hmm, average below 64MB/s read small files. No way for instant load game scenes.


My Adata SX8200 Pro 2TB in a B450 board. I've always read the 4KiB Q1T1 is what a user "feels"...seems all these newer NVME drives are niche products for people doing heavy lifting. Video editing and AI and such. Especially when you throw price in the mix.

*edit*

And I never even installed the heatsink on my drive.
Posted on Reply
#17
Valantar
Nater


My Adata SX8200 Pro 2TB in a B450 board. I've always read the 4KiB Q1T1 is what a user "feels"...seems all these newer NVME drives are niche products for people doing heavy lifting. Video editing and AI and such. Especially when you throw price in the mix.

*edit*

And I never even installed the heatsink on my drive.
Pretty much, yes. Fancy numbers for drag race-style benchmarks, but unless the number of NAND channels increases (which it won't) random speeds are unlikely to move much. "Faster NAND" often just means wider interfaces, which again just helps sequential loads. There isn't much movement in terms of raw per-block speeds overall, and thus random speeds on the high end stay mostly static.
Posted on Reply
#19
Gmr_Chick
The first SSD looks nice. The 2nd one, with that thingy (I assume those are heat pipes? Good lawd) slapped on it though? Stupid! :roll:
Posted on Reply
#20
watzupken
Very soon, you will see active cooling for SSD. The sequential transfer speed is meaningless for most people anyway.
Posted on Reply
#21
Caring1
watzupken
Very soon, you will see active cooling for SSD. The sequential transfer speed is meaningless for most people anyway.
Active cooling has been a thing for a while now.

Posted on Reply
#22
Th3pwn3r
Caring1
Active cooling has been a thing for a while now.


Yeah...been around a while. The only real benefit to m.2 drives is less clutter in my opinion. I might even go for a board without sata ports at this point.
Posted on Reply
#23
InVasMani
Valantar
It's a great value add! Buy an SSD, get a compact heatsink for a future SFF build bundled in with it!

Seriously, that thing is significantly bigger than most 15-25W laptop heatsinks. It could probably cool a 35W CPU decently with direct-die mounting.
It's better than most VRM heatsinks. Perhaps it's actually a bit more useful for raid-0 due to additional stress of striping the data!? Wishful thinking, but would enjoy seeing a actual justified purpose to the extravagant cooler.
Posted on Reply
#24
watzupken
Caring1
Active cooling has been a thing for a while now.


I mean active stock cooling. :oops:
Posted on Reply
#25
Nater
Th3pwn3r
Yeah...been around a while. The only real benefit to m.2 drives is less clutter in my opinion. I might even go for a board without sata ports at this point.
I'm honestly surprised they aren't just soldering an NVME SSD right to the board at this point. I imagine somewhere there's an OEM doing it already?
Posted on Reply
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