Monday, March 22nd 2021

Intel 12th Generation Alder Lake Platform Reportedly Brings 20% Single-Threaded Performance Uplift

Intel only just announced their 11th generation Rocket Lake-S desktop processors last week but we are already receiving information about the next generation Alder Lake-S platform which will finally make the jump to 10 nm. Intel slides for the upcoming family of processors have been leaked and they reveal some interesting information including a claimed 20% single-threaded performance increases from the new Golden Cove core design and 10 nm SuperFin node. The processors will feature Intel Hybrid Technology with a mix of small low-performance cores and large high-performance cores with a maximum of eight each for sixteen total cores. The processors will also include the latest connectivity with both PCIe 4.0 and PCIe 5.0 support along with DDR4 and DDR5 4800 MHz compatibility.

Intel will also be launching a new socket type called LGA1700 with a new package size which will render existing cooling solutions for LGA115X and LGA1200 sockets incompatible. The processors will also come with the launch of a new 600 Series chipset with PCIe 3.0 and PCIe 4.0 support along with the usual complement of USB, SATA, and networking. The entry-level 600-series motherboards will only support DDR4 memory at up to 3200 MHz while high-end Z690 motherboards will include DDR5 support. Intel has confirmed that they intend to launch Alder Lake later this year but it is yet to be known if they are referring to the desktop or mobile series.
Source: VideoCardz
Add your own comment

108 Comments on Intel 12th Generation Alder Lake Platform Reportedly Brings 20% Single-Threaded Performance Uplift

#101
Chrispy_
Prima.Vera
Any news about how many Cores will the top dog have? Frequencies? Wattage? Something to forget this mizerabile fiasco called 11th generation :)
The top dog will be a 16C/24T thing, no idea on Freq/TDP yet as it relies on Intel fixing their FUBAR 10nm or pulling another Rocket Lake and backporting it to 14+++(+?)

It's basically going to be a "cove" 8C/16T big core with 8 puny Atom cores that handle low-priority, low power background stuff. The labelling convention that people are unofficially using (me included) is perhaps misleading though: 16C/24T implies all cores are equal which they obviously aren't. It also implies that instructions can be shifted around between big and little cores easily.

The reality is that the big cores will look very much like an 11th-gen i5/i7/19, but hopefully on 10nm if Intel can actually get it working properly. The little cores won't have the same instruction set. Sure, it's still basic x86-64 but "cove" and "mont" architectures are quite different internally - you can just move instructions from one core to another if they're not the same core and it won't even be a hardware issue. Remember how long it took Microsoft to get the scheduler right for Zen2? That was just two identical sets of four cores on indentical architecture. I suspect Intel's Big.Little architecture attempts might take Microsoft half a decade to really take advantage of properly. It would be nice if I was wrong - I genuinely WANT to be wrong but we're talking about a company that had 2+ years of prior notice to getsomething as simple as CCX scheduling worked out, and they still missed the launch by several months. This is the same company that, despite promising to do so a decade ago under Sinovsky still hasn't finished moving some of their underlying OS technology off Windows NT whilst they instead focus on new icon art and ways to sell and use your personal data for profit.

So yeah to get code to run seamlessly across two different core types, concurrently, with different cache, different instruction set support, at different clockspeeds, priorities, registers.... OMG. Google and Apple might be able to do it because their underlying OS isn't a dumpster fire that's been burning for two decades. Meanwhile, Microsoft - I, uh. I have no words. Here are some other peoples' words:

[MEDIA=imgur]y6clspP[/MEDIA]
Posted on Reply
#102
Prima.Vera
Is DDR5 confirmed for ALL Z960 chipset mobos, or just for the most expensive Z690 ones? And guessing it will come with 2 slots DDR 4 + 2 slots DDR 5 ?? Therefore limiting the total RAM it can be installed?
Also both the cipset and the CPU will support PCI-E 4.0 meaning at least double the PCI-E 4 lines compared to the Z590?
Posted on Reply
#103
Dredi
Prima.Vera
And guessing it will come with 2 slots DDR 4 + 2 slots DDR 5 ??
Maybe some silly mobo will do that, but most will definitely be either 4 slots of ddr5 or 4 slots of ddr4 depending on the model. There would be a bunch of unused components on board to support ddr4 making such multipurpose mobos more expensive than pure ddr5.
Posted on Reply
#104
Prima.Vera
Dredi
Maybe some silly mobo will do that, but most will definitely be either 4 slots of ddr5 or 4 slots of ddr4 depending on the model. There would be a bunch of unused components on board to support ddr4 making such multipurpose mobos more expensive than pure ddr5.
I hope you are right, but remember the DDR3->DDR4 transition. ;)
Btw, I'm still on DDR3. How interesting it will be to skip entirely DDR4 and go for DDR5 for my next upgrade build. But don't see anywhere those 8Ghz modules unfortunately....
Posted on Reply
#105
Dredi
Prima.Vera
I hope you are right, but remember the DDR3->DDR4 transition. ;)
Btw, I'm still on DDR3. How interesting it will be to skip entirely DDR4 and go for DDR5 for my next upgrade build. But don't see anywhere those 8Ghz modules unfortunately....
But who needs 8GHz, when you can get 512GB sticks at 7.2GHz ;)
www.techpowerup.com/280143/samsung-develops-industrys-first-hkmg-based-ddr5-memory-ideal-for-bandwidth-intensive-advanced-computing-applications

All you need is a 10% overclock to get to the 8GHz you dream of.
Posted on Reply
#107
Dredi
Prima.Vera
I only need 16GB, ok, 32 if they are cheap. And yeah. Those 7.2Ghz modules looks good.
Except for the timings.
No-one has made chips available yet that would enable less than 32GB pairs of sticks to be made. So for 16 you’d be running single channel.

The specifications do permit 8GB sticks though, so maybe some chipmaker will eventually make the chips needed for those as well.
Posted on Reply
#108
DAWMan
I’d settle for 20%, but 20% less heat, less cores, less Watts.

Just make a better CPU, not “better” marketing campaigns.

DDR5 and PCI 5 can wait. Put the Horse before the Cart this time.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment