Tuesday, April 13th 2021

AMD Launches Ryzen 5000G "Cezanne" APU Lineup for OEMs

AMD has today decided to launch the next generation of Accelerated Processing Units (APUs), now in form of the 5000G lineup codenamed Cezanne. The APUs are getting launched as OEM-exclusive products for now, which means that only manufacturers like Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc. can have access to them. AMD is set to announce these processors for wider masses, such as consumer DIYers, later this year. So you must be wondering what is new about the 5000G APUs. For starters, the new APUs feature AMD's improved Zen 3 core with a notable IPC boost over Zen 2 found in last generation 4000G APUs. When it comes to graphics, the new APUs feature anywhere from 6-8 GPU cores, based on the Vega architecture.

When it comes to the available models, AMD lists six SKUs, all differentiating in CPU/GPU core count, TDP, and frequency. There are three regular SKUs, with their power-efficient variants. The regular SKUs are AMD Ryzen 7 5700G, Ryzen 5 5600G, and Ryzen 3 5300G. They are normal SKUs that have a TDP of 65 Watts, meaning a higher base frequency needing a more adequate cooling solution. However, as there are regular SKUs, there are also power-efficient, TDP-constrained models present. Called the AMD Ryzen 7 5700GE, Ryzen 5 5600GE, and Ryzen 3 5300GE, these models bring the TDP down to 35 Watts and reduce base frequency by a couple of hundreds of MHz.
The listed models, which you can see specifications of, are for now OEM-exclusive products. For general consumers, the announcement should follow sometimes in the coming months, so you have to wait to get these processors for a bit longer. For more information, please visit AMD's website and find greater details about them.
Source: AMD
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39 Comments on AMD Launches Ryzen 5000G "Cezanne" APU Lineup for OEMs

#26
IceShroom
R0H1T
There's no evidence that "infinity cache" (fancy word for L3?) will work for an APU, as yet, not to mention LPDDR5 or LPDDR5x won't come close to the bandwidth a single HBM stack can provide.
Necessity is the mother of all invention. If AMD needs certain level of performence for their APU they will implement Infinity Cache on APU. As for LPDDR5 it may not reach HBM like bandwidth, but 128-bit LPDDR5-4800 will give 76.8 GBps bandwidth and LPDDR5-5500 will give 88GBps, which is enough for 1080p, the resolution all gaming laptop uses. HBM/GDDR is not suitable for gerenal desktop workload.
Valantar
Uh, what? Why? In what world? The iGPU in this will blow the pants off any GT 710, and will likely beat the 1030 in most scenarios too.
May be the system builder need to add a Nvidia gpu or just to punish the customer. Seen Picasso based PC from system builder with Ryzen 3+GT 710. After Picasso launched there was a laptop available in my country with these specs Ryzen 5 3500U/ 7 3700U+4GB RAM+1TB HDD + MX 230 +1080p display at around $550-$650.:confused:
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#27
Vayra86


Who the hell is the painter Dragon Crest then?

What's after this... Smeagol? I'm lost
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#28
HansRapad
a lineup that Most likely ignored by Big SI

since they can’t fulfill the order on high volume ehm same node ehm, this most likely be ignored, no matter how fast they are, if they can’t fulfill forget being on Optiplex boxes on large quantities
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#29
jardows
I can't believe all the complainers about this including Vega. I have a use/need for a Zen 3 CPU, but in a system that does not need the added expense of a GPU. All I need is basic video output. AMD could be putting Polaris in these for all I care, from a GPU performance standpoint. If I need anything more powerful, I'm going for a dedicated GPU. If anyone thinks that AMD or Intel would be able to mass produce APU's with more powerful graphics in any quantity and at a cost right now to make up for the supply/cost issues with dGPU's, I have some ocean front property in Idaho to sell you.
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#30
medi01
TheDeeGee
Why only OEM, is AMD tone deaf or something?
80%+ of the market is OEMs.
rainxh11
Another glorified VEGA APU generation again
OEM PCs with APUs tend not to be used for gaming.
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#31
Mysteoa
TheDeeGee
Why only OEM, is AMD tone deaf or something?
As a company that is after more money, it makes sense to target the bigger market first.
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#32
Speedyblupi
rainxh11
Another glorified VEGA APU generation again
another mediocre APU
where's the RDNA APU
and most importantly, AMD already making PS5 & Serie X APUs
why not compete in the PC Market with similar offering
and APU with powerful GPU, maybe 28 - 40 CUs variants?, 6-8 cores with integrated HBM2 or GDDR6
HBM2 would make more sense because it can fit in the CPU PCB, yet more expensive
i'm for one i would gladly pay 700 $ for an APU as powerful as the Series X in the PC, AMD is leaving a huge market
RDNA2's main advantages over GCN are that it uses less power, and it scales much better at the high end, but GCN has its own advantage: its CUs are much smaller. When you're making an iGPU with only 8CUs, the power usage and poor high-end scaling are insignificant, to the extent that it only becomes worthwhile to use RDNA at around 24CUs or more.

8 RDNA2 CUs would be slightly faster than 8 Vega CUs overall, and would use less power, but would use significantly more die area, which would reduce availability and increase prices. We shouldn't want AMD to put RDNA2 on desktop APUs until it's worthwhile for them to do so (which even DDR5 might not be enough for, though it's hard to predict at this point).

It would be possible to make a larger iGPU if you included HBM with it (and AMD and Intel actually did this a few years ago when they collaborated to design "Hades Canyon"), but due to the high cost of HBM and the interposers it requires, it's more profitable for AMD to sell high-end GPUs and CPUs separately. The console SoCs can provide enough bandwidth for a powerful iGPU at relatively low cost because they use GDDR6, but not in a form factor that would be possible to fit into a socketable CPU.

Hypothetically we could see some sort of console-PC hybrid with a soldered high-end APU, or something similar to Intel's NUC modules that could be used in a small chassis, but it's unlikely that AMD would take a risk on a project like this any time soon, as they're still relatively small, and currently making a ton of profit by selling GPUs and CPUs separately.
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#33
r9
rainxh11
Another glorified VEGA APU generation again
another mediocre APU
where's the RDNA APU
and most importantly, AMD already making PS5 & Serie X APUs
why not compete in the PC Market with similar offering
and APU with powerful GPU, maybe 28 - 40 CUs variants?, 6-8 cores with integrated HBM2 or GDDR6
HBM2 would make more sense because it can fit in the CPU PCB, yet more expensive
i'm for one i would gladly pay 700 $ for an APU as powerful as the Series X in the PC, AMD is leaving a huge market
To be honest that's what I was expecting to happen on the APU front, but I don't see how it would put more $$$ into AMD pocket so I don't hold my breath for it.
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#34
pantherx12
TheDeeGee
Why only OEM, is AMD tone deaf or something?
It's about mine share right now, whilst they have a dominant market position they need to take advantage of it. There is currently a global chip shortage so they need to sell to the majority. Building your own computer is still niche. Buying a Dell, hp or Lenovo etc is far more common place for the average consumer.

So by walking into a shop and being recommended and AMD machine and it bring in stock and that consumer having a positive experience they'll remember that when buying their next machine, or getting a machine for their parents, kids, recommending to neighbours and friends etc.


If AMD capture the mindshare of the mainstream market then they have more money to pour into tmsc and produce chips for folks like us.
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#35
DAWMan
I sometimes buy a Supermicro or ASRock 1U, ditch the chassis and use my own 1U to get a chip early.
Lord forbid I lose a couple hundred rather than wait.
But no way I’d buy a tower with a motherboard using horizontally aligned DIMMs.
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#36
seth1911
Yeah AMD can do it my next would be a Alderlake with 48 EU, im in distance learning but nothing from AMD is for a fair price.


In 2022 ill have the next 9 weeks school then ill buy Alderlake, fck AMD
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#37
Vanny
seth1911
Yeah AMD can do it my next would be a Alderlake with 48 EU, im in distance learning but nothing from AMD is for a fair price.


In 2022 ill have the next 9 weeks school then ill buy Alderlake, fck AMD
You have a lot of confidence for Alder Lake don't you. Let's hope you're correct -- only way to get them to lower prices for my Zen chips is through competition.
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#38
Valantar
seth1911
Yeah AMD can do it my next would be a Alderlake with 48 EU, im in distance learning but nothing from AMD is for a fair price.


In 2022 ill have the next 9 weeks school then ill buy Alderlake, fck AMD
In 2022 the chip shortage might be over, so we might actually see semi-normal component prices. Until then, anything that's even remotely in demand will sadly be overpriced.
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#39
AusWolf
"AMD is set to announce these processors for wider masses, such as consumer DIYers, later this year." - The best part of the news. :toast:
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