Thursday, May 13th 2021

Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger Outlines 2020-21 CSR Report, Goals for the Near-Future

The following is an opinion editorial by Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger. It introduces Intel's 2020-2021 Corporate Responsibility Report: I am honored to return to Intel as CEO, and both humbled by the challenges and excited by the limitless opportunities made possible by the magic of technology.

Digital technology is transforming the world at an accelerated pace, driven by what I call the four "superpowers": cloud, connectivity fueled by 5G, artificial intelligence (Al) and the intelligent edge. They are superpowers because each expands the impact of the others. And together, they are reshaping every aspect of our lives and work. This goes straight to Intel's purpose and my own passion: creating world-changing technology that touches and improves the lives of every person on the planet.
That potential impact has never been clearer to me than during this past year. We've seen unprecedented challenges, including a global pandemic that brought untold suffering with loss of life and livelihoods, heightened social injustice and inequities, and continued impact of climate change. As a technologist, I have been inspired to see the collective response to these challenges and the critical role technology has played, from the development of vaccines and new therapeutic treatments in record time, to the rapid deployment of online education and learning resources.

From my early days at Intel to today, I have been extremely proud of our company's long-standing leadership in corporate responsibility and sustainability. This focus has positioned us to effectively create both long-term value and respond to the growing importance of environmental, social and governance issues to our investors, customers, employees and other stakeholders.

In May 2020, we outlined our 2030 RISE strategy and corporate responsibility goals for the next decade to accelerate the integration of responsible, inclusive and sustainable practices and innovative approaches in our operations and supply chain, across the technology industry and beyond. All of this is enabled through our technology and the passion and expertise of our employees.

While we are just one year into our work on these ambitious goals, I am proud of the progress and accomplishments detailed throughout this year's corporate responsibility report. Most notably:
  • In our own operations and supply chain, we made progress toward our 2030 goals of 100% renewable energy and net positive water use, increasing renewable energy from 71% to 82% and conserving 7.1 billion gallons of water in 2020. For the fourth consecutive year, we received a Leadership score in CDP's Supplier Engagement Rating for our work to engage our suppliers to expand their climate and water disclosure.
  • In collaboration with the industry, we launched the Alliance for Global Inclusion, a new coalition focused on creating a shared set of diversity and inclusion metrics in four critical areas: leadership representation, inclusive language, inclusive product development and STEM readiness in underserved communities.
  • For larger global impact, we worked with over 170 customers, partners, governments, academia and NGOs on 230 projects around the globe through Intel's Pandemic Response Technology Initiative to accelerate access to technology at the point of patient care and speed scientific research, ensure access to online learning for students, and aid in economic recovery.
As we look ahead, we will build on this momentum to drive progress and take us to even greater heights in 2021 and in the years ahead, including:
  • Advancing diversity, equity, accessibility and inclusion in our global workforce, and advocating for public policies and laws that combat discrimination and inequities impacting our employees and our communities, as well as taking actions to advance our 2030 goals, including doubling the number of women and underrepresented minorities in senior leadership and increasing representation of women in technical roles to 40%.
  • Accelerating change across the industry, working with ecosystem partners to significantly expand global impact through responsible minerals sourcing practices, and collaborating to transform safety in transportation through Intel's Mobileye business and Responsibility-Sensitive Safety (RSS) model and integration into standards development.
  • Evolving the Pandemic Response Technology Initiative to become the Intel RISE Technology Initiative to create a broader platform for action to make a greater impact in the world. This expanded initiative will provide a disciplined framework through which Intel employees can work with customers and partners to solve problems and advance our RISE strategy and progress toward the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals through accelerated application of technology to global challenges in the areas of health and safety, inclusion and accessibility, and climate and sustainability.
We will help solve the world's greatest challenges through deep technical collaboration with our customers, helping them transform their industries with radical innovation and leadership products, and achieve their own corporate responsibility goals. Along with customers, partners, governments and NGOs, we also will support smart policies that accelerate the creation of safe and secure digital infrastructure, advanced manufacturing, and an inclusive and skilled future workforce.

I believe deeply in this company and the wonderful future we will create together. Our employees' technology expertise and passion to have a positive impact in the world every day are what inspire my confidence that we can achieve our objectives for the next decade.

Read Intel's full 2020-2021 Corporate Responsibility Report
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24 Comments on Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger Outlines 2020-21 CSR Report, Goals for the Near-Future

#1
R-T-B
btarunrintelligent edge
Does anyone even know what this is supposed to be?

Will it get me a closer shave?

All I got out of this was a whole lot of buzzwords...
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#2
rutra80
What about equality and diversity??
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#3
R-T-B
rutra80What about equality and diversity??
btarunrAdvancing diversity, equity, accessibility and inclusion in our global workforce, and advocating for public policies and laws that combat discrimination and inequities impacting our employees and our communities, as well as taking actions to advance our 2030 goals, including doubling the number of women and underrepresented minorities in senior leadership and increasing representation of women in technical roles to 40%.
Personally, I was hoping you'd all miss it because of the types of discussion it attracts...
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#4
Caring1
"including doubling the number of women"
So they're moving in to cloning now too? :laugh:
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#5
R-T-B
...in technical roles.
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#6
voltage
This ceo so far is getting things done, he is focused. it seems a shame Intel didn't have him at the helm starting in 2013, 2013 was the start of the down slide for Intel, that particular ceo at the time was busy getting his noodle wet instead of doing actual work. I am rooting for Intel again, we need competition to keep the move of innovation going. That makes life exciting for many.
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#7
ZoneDymo
voltageThis ceo so far is getting things done, he is focused. it seems a shame Intel didn't have him at the helm starting in 2013, 2013 was the start of the down slide for Intel, that particular ceo at the time was busy getting his noodle wet instead of doing actual work. I am rooting for Intel again, we need competition to keep the move of innovation going. That makes life exciting for many.
I agree but as I said before, a lot of what he says is generic (lying) ceo bullshit to paint things better then they are, I was hoping this would be a no-nonsense kinda guy but so far...nope.
But yeah, we will see if he "gets things done", I know it was already too far along but I hope he is embarrassed about the Rocket Lake release and knows they need to push WAY harder to get some cred back.
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#8
rutra80
@R-T-B Ah sorry I've just skimmed the text and missed that important part :D We already had quite a chuckle recently so it's hopefully enough for some time (:
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#9
Caring1
Whatever happened to hiring the most suitable person for the job, regardless of race, color or gender?
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#10
trparky
Caring1Whatever happened to hiring the most suitable person for the job, regardless of race, color or gender?
Don't you know? It's all about checking those boxes.
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#11
R-T-B
Caring1Whatever happened to hiring the most suitable person for the job, regardless of race, color or gender?
Hiring bias. This leads to hiring mostly white, heterosexual people. And no, not because white heterosexual people are inherently more skilled or any other racist bs. Just because of the subconscious culture that exists.

John Oliver (I know he's not an expert but he cites real cases, and it's mainstream digestable) makes some excellent points on one way this can work here, don't be fooled by the title:


That's the concept anyways. Whether an artificial correction is the best approach is debatable, but it's the best thing they've come up with thus far. I'm not a personal fan of it but I understand that rationale.
trparkyDon't you know? It's all about checking those boxes.
More or less, yes. But that's because otherwise, those boxes never get checked at the statistical rate "equality" would dictate.

EDIT: Laugh responses to this are somewhat disturbing. The policy used to fight this insitituional racism isn't ideal, heck it's outright racist itself sometimes, but there's nothing laughable about trying, and there is nothing funny about the issue either.
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#12
hardcore_gamer
Thanks for opening my eyes, Intel. Going forward I'll buy my CPUs exclusively from a company run by an Asian woman CEO.
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#13
R-T-B
hardcore_gamerThanks for opening my eyes, Intel. Going forward I'll buy my CPUs exclusively from a company run by an Asian woman CEO.
Hope this doesn't give anyone no CPUs to buy over something as silly as corporate inclusion efforts, but AMD...

www.amd.com/en/corporate/research-diversity-inclusion
Posted on Reply
#15
Caring1
R-T-BHiring bias. This leads to hiring mostly white, heterosexual people. And no, not because white heterosexual people are inherently more skilled or any other racist bs. Just because of the subconscious culture that exists.

John Oliver (I know he's not an expert but he cites real cases, and it's mainstream digestable) makes some excellent points on one way this can work here, don't be fooled by the title:

The video is geo blocked and I'm not bothered enough to search for it on YouTube, but I get the notion behind it.
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#16
R-T-B
Caring1The video is geo blocked and I'm not bothered enough to search for it on YouTube, but I get the notion behind it.
Appreciate that. Screw geoblocks, btw.
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#17
mechtech
wow that speech or memo or whatever, like it was edited by marketing and legal and who knows, seems kind of fluid and an over use of buzz words for an engineer.

as an engineer, my speech probably would have been like, we're gonna get 7nm fabs going now, and make better stuff now

k thx bye

:)
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#18
rutra80
R-T-BHope this doesn't give anyone no CPUs to buy over something as silly as corporate inclusion efforts, but AMD...

www.amd.com/en/corporate/research-diversity-inclusion
Every corpo gets into it to avoid lashing, but one has a couple paragraphs subpage and the other whole department.
hardcore_gamerI don't see any predesignated quotas for birthing people.
Thank god we're not like crocodiles whose sex depends on temperature the eggs are hatched at.
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#19
Xzibit
rutra80Every corpo gets into it to avoid lashing, but one has a couple paragraphs subpage and the other whole department.
Not to mention D&I started in 2015. Pat themselves on the back in 2018 for meeting their own set of %, Lost women in 2020. Uses global numbers to make reports balanced and restarts factories that were suppose to be operational well over 10+yrs and boast about inclusion. All while reporting record breaking quarters and margins along the way.

So yeah its a lot of PR "we are with you".

Is it a nice thing? Sure.
If you have to keep reminding yourself as a company. Maybe something is wrong. In 2016 a year after their D&I program started they started the WarmLine (Worker retention) program because women and minorities were leaving at a high rate.
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#20
Tom Sunday
If that is all Gelsinger has to say we have big problems ahead with the leadership of Intel. All he said were general corporate niceties and displaying that he definetely is not a "game-changer" and the type of guy that will shake things up in the current and still complacent Intel corporate environment. As a consumer who brings in the bread and butter for Intel's stockholders, I do not care about social governance, 100% renewable energy and net positive water use? As an enthusiast I was looking for cold hard facts about new product deliveries and performances. Perhaps Alder Lake revisited. With his influence and connections in the world-wide tech industry he discussing Intel's real big picture ahead, GPU futures and again demonstrating that he is the right "new guy" for the job.

The good news Gelsinger met "virtually" during a semiconductor White House discussion on Monday to get his hands on $10 billion U.S. funding from President Biden’s $2 trillion American Jobs Plan, which he points out includes $50 billion in semiconductor manufacturing US taxpayer support. I was actually surprised that parts of the Gelsinger's report were even published here on this tech-channel as it says essentially nothing to the man on the street or the simple me! He could have done much better with being new to his top-job and coming out of the gate.
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#21
R-T-B
rutra80Every corpo gets into it to avoid lashing, but one has a couple paragraphs subpage and the other whole department.
Oh really? What's the department at intel called?
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#22
Caring1
R-T-BOh really? What's the department at intel called?
Public Relations.
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#23
R-T-B
Caring1Public Relations.
And going with his argument, AMD doesn't have a PR department?

Yeah, no. I don't think so.

He's either arguing Intel has a "special" equality department AMD does not have, or talking out of his... well, I'll not be rude, we were doing better afterall. Point is all companies are doing this now.
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