Friday, July 2nd 2021

GIGABYTE Announces AORUS Xtreme Gen4 AIC SSD: 28 GB/s Transfer Rate

GIGABYTE Technology, one of the top global manufacturers of motherboards, graphics cards, and hardware solutions, today announced the AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD with 28 GB/s ultra-fast access speed. This high capacity and extreme performance SSD builds in eight 4 TB 2nd generation PCIe 4.0 NVMe M.2 SSDs with PHISON PS5018-E18 controller, AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD offers ultra-high transfer bandwidth and superior access performance through RAID configuration.

The AORUS Xtreme Gen4 AIC SSD features ultimate thermal design with large aluminium finned heatsink, M.2 baseplate for passive cooling, 10 temperature sensors and active dual-fan heat dissipation design, while the exclusive SSD Tool Box offers users real-time status and temperature monitoring of SSDs. GIGABYTE AORUS Storage Manager allows users to configure a RAID array with a single click and 3-phase fan speed adjustment, which enabling AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD to keep cool and performing at a high level. It promises a non-throttling experience for users who phase for high capacity and breakthrough performance.
"With advancements in both hardware and flash memory, the SSD performance jump up to a new level, however there is still a gap from the uppermost 32 GB/s transmission bandwidth of PCIe 4.0 x16…" said Jackson Hsu, Director of the GIGABYTE Channel Solutions Product Development Division. "GIGABYTE has played a leading role in the development and production of PCIe 4.0 SSDs. After the recent launch of AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD, GIGABYTE has further released AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD to approach the maximum PCIe 4.0 bandwidth with 28 GB/s transfer speed. The dual fan thermal design enables optimized performance under low temperature, while the large capacity of 32 TB allows users to store more data and reduce the risk of insufficient storage space."

AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD features high-quality, hairline brushed baseplate with a curved edge design of the outlook, and Integrates 8 sets of 4 TB AORUS Gen4 7000s level SSDs with PHISON PS5018-E18 controllers. By the RAID configuration, it not only provides a large capacity of up to 32 TB, but also increases the sequential read speed to 28 GB/s, which surpass the AORUS Gen4 7000s SSD up to 4 times speed and become the highest performance storage device among all consumer SSDs in the market.

In order to avoid the throttling by overheating under high-speed operation and even data damage or loss, AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD is designed with large aluminium finned heatsink, M.2 baseplate, and giant thermal back plate to effectively dissipate the heat generated by the SSD in high-speed operation. Meanwhile the system air flow, the large air volume of the dual fans, and the thermal vent on the baffle plate create active heat dissipation to promise high performance of the SSD under ultra-high speed operation without throttling.

AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD comes with 10 thermal sensors, which enable users to monitor the temperatures and real-time status of eight 4 TB M.2 SSDs through GIGABYTE's exclusive SSD Tool Box. Furthermore, AORUS Storage Manager comes with three fan operating modes of fan speed adjustment for silent and effective cooling. Users can configure a RAID 0 Array with a single click for impressive storage performance as well!

AORUS XTREME Gen4 AIC SSD supports PCIe 4.0 and is backward compatible with PCIe Gen3, which can perfectly unleash the supreme storage performance of the PCIe 4.0 or PCIe Gen3 platform! Enhanced by GIGABYTE motherboards with PCIe 4.0 supportive hardware design, users can now enjoy the improved data transfer volume of PCIe storage, unleashed hidden performance of PC peripherals, limit-breaking transfer speed, and the ultimate performance from 2nd generation PCIe 4.0.
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21 Comments on GIGABYTE Announces AORUS Xtreme Gen4 AIC SSD: 28 GB/s Transfer Rate

#1
Anymal
It was just the matter of time till we see pcie ssd with vents as gpus.
Posted on Reply
#3
TumbleGeorge
LoL random read of very small files still below 100MB/s. Garbage! :D
Yes yes the ntfs, or windows 10, or weak CPUs, or phison controller, or security check for viruses, or combined factors are guilty but, but, but this is very inadequate in 2021 for some expensive and newest devices!
Posted on Reply
#4
Zubasa
TumbleGeorgeLoL random read of very small files still below 100MB/s. Garbage! :D
Yes yes the ntfs, or windows 10, or weak CPUs, or phison controller, or security check for viruses, or combined factors are guilty but, but, but this is very inadequate in 2021 for some expensive and newest devices!
This thing is just a bunch of m.2 SSDs in RAID 0, so it makes sense why the 4k reads are as slow as a single drive.
Posted on Reply
#5
Yttersta
Any details on what RAID types it supports? This could be a budget alternative to the regular enterprise AICs if it supports RAID1/0 or particularly 6.
Posted on Reply
#7
b1k3rdude
TumbleGeorgeLoL random read of very small files still below 100MB/s. Garbage! :D
Yes yes the ntfs, or windows 10, or weak CPUs, or phison controller, or security check for viruses, or combined factors are guilty but, but, but this is very inadequate in 2021 for some expensive and newest devices!
Spot on fella! I keep seeing these new SSD's and each and every time the 4K1QD numbers are still sh*te.
Posted on Reply
#9
Prima.Vera
That 4K speed is hilarious, haha!
Nice job for a ubber expensive drive like this :kookoo:
Posted on Reply
#10
Dammeron
TumbleGeorgeLoL random read of very small files still below 100MB/s. Garbage! :D
Yes yes the ntfs, or windows 10, or weak CPUs, or phison controller, or security check for viruses, or combined factors are guilty but, but, but this is very inadequate in 2021 for some expensive and newest devices!
This SSD is for people working on huge files, such as 8K videos etc... What You need there is sequential speed as high as possible.
Posted on Reply
#11
TumbleGeorge
DammeronThis SSD is for people working on huge files, such as 8K videos etc... What You need there is sequential speed as high as possible.
Not I, all gamers need for instance loading of game scenes. There is many small files dispersed in SSD.
Posted on Reply
#12
srsbsns
TumbleGeorgeNot I, all gamers need for instance loading of game scenes. There is many small files dispersed in SSD.
What happens when games have all their files loaded into single files such as .pak or something? Does it mean it becomes sequential?
Posted on Reply
#13
TumbleGeorge
srsbsnsWhat happens when games have all their files loaded into single files such as .pak or something? Does it mean it becomes sequential?
I'm not specialist and don't know. There has rumors to make loading in VRAM from RAM of full scene in one scratch file but not sure.
One more variant but maybe light off topic:
Which is better, static or dynamic loading?
Posted on Reply
#14
Makaveli
lol its good to see some people understand the use case for this vs I need to load my games faster!

Databases, photoshop and video editors will be a good use case for this.
Posted on Reply
#15
TumbleGeorge
Makavelilol its good to see some people understand the use case for this vs I need to load my games faster!

Databases, photoshop and video editors will be a good use case for this.
Only when loading very big files from storage. After that when make processing, benefits from super duper speedest SSD may not exist.
Posted on Reply
#16
Makaveli
TumbleGeorgeOnly when loading very big files from storage.
That is the use case I just pointed out.
Posted on Reply
#17
TheUn4seen
Makavelilol its good to see some people understand the use case for this vs I need to load my games faster!

Databases, photoshop and video editors will be a good use case for this.
I have my doubts. Database access is highly random and since this product is just some consumer SSDs in RAID 0, random access is no faster than that of the single drive. Photoshop isn't all that sensitive to storage speed - I sometimes edit 180MP files from a drum scanner and the limiting factor is always the CPU, I see very little, if any, difference between a cheap consumer Intel 660p SSD and a RAM drive. I don't have any experience with video editing - I know fast access is important for scraping - but I'm under the impression that the limiting factor is usually processing performance, not storage speed. Usually when really fast local storage is required the main concern is random access time, not linear read speed, that's why Optane is a godsend despite the hefty price. This product seems to be aimed at a wealthy consumer looking to enlarge his e-peen, or needs a lot of reasonably fast storage, with space being the main concern. 32TB of local SSD storage is nothing to sniff at.
Posted on Reply
#18
ypsylon
This will be actually interesting product if you can purchase card alone and add 8 your own drives. I would love to get my hand on one of those (empty). I don't need RAID in any capacity but for pooling or for maximum volumes in smallest footprint (of 1 x16 slot) this is amazing. No need to scratch head how to access on-board M.2 when something goes wrong (I had that issue very recently) in liquid cooled rendering machine. Yeah... it was interesting...

There is gigantic price premium on any such card fully equipped and as such it's terrible value, but empty - Just take my money. :respect:
Posted on Reply
#19
LukeCuda
why is it half as slow as it should be?

8x7GB/sec = 56GB read.

more trash products.
Posted on Reply
#20
claes
Because it’s not PCIe 5 :rolleyes:
ypsylonThis will be actually interesting product if you can purchase card alone and add 8 your own drives. I would love to get my hand on one of those (empty). I don't need RAID in any capacity but for pooling or for maximum volumes in smallest footprint (of 1 x16 slot) this is amazing. No need to scratch head how to access on-board M.2 when something goes wrong (I had that issue very recently) in liquid cooled rendering machine. Yeah... it was interesting...

There is gigantic price premium on any such card fully equipped and as such it's terrible value, but empty - Just take my money. :respect:
Quite a few on the market — I think gigabyte has a 4 card one

www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1604479-REG/highpoint_ssd7540_pcie_4_0_x16_8_port.html
Posted on Reply
#21
R-T-B
TumbleGeorgeLoL random read of very small files still below 100MB/s. Garbage! :D
Yes yes the ntfs, or windows 10, or weak CPUs, or phison controller, or security check for viruses, or combined factors are guilty but, but, but this is very inadequate in 2021 for some expensive and newest devices!
It's due to the RAID tech used. With very small files, you are writing to a single RAID stripe, and it certainly will act exactly like a single nvme drive there.
claesBecause it’s not PCIe 5 :rolleyes:


Quite a few on the market — I think gigabyte has a 4 card one

www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1604479-REG/highpoint_ssd7540_pcie_4_0_x16_8_port.html
I own a 2-card one. Cost like $200.00. Does not support secure boot if booting from raid. Weird device, not really something I'd advise to everyone.
Posted on Reply
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