Tuesday, October 12th 2021

HarmonicDyne Poseidon— A Beryllium-Killer Headphone is Launched on Kickstarter

Continued with the success of the HarmonicDyne Zeus flagship headphone, the Poseidon is developed and released based on the request of the audiophile community. It's a premium-grade headphone designed for the most discerning audiophiles. The Poseidon is among the first headphones to use an innovative pure nickel diaphragm. Compared with beryllium, pure nickel is four times in density and two times in tensile strength. A diaphragm driver made of purified nickel is much stiffer and more responsive, delivering a clearer sound with lower distortions. Combined with the open-back design, the Poseidon delivers a frequency response of 10 Hz to 40 kHz, allowing listeners to feel the incredible connection and transparency with the music.

What's more, a premium grade of solid maple wood is utilized to construct the housing cavity for the drivers. As a frequent choice of wood for making professional musical instruments, maple perfectly matches the new nickel diaphragm drivers because of its high responsiveness and acoustic projection. The solid maple housing allows emphasis of fundamental frequencies and quick decays, making for incredible note separation and clarity. On top of that, the sophisticated maple wood bespoke design casts a glamour over the headphone, making the Poseidon look as beautiful as it sounds.
Listening comfort is also the priority in Poseidon design. The Poseidon comes with ultra-light ergonomic ear pads to ensure comfort for a long time wearing. The ear pads are crafted to high-quality nanometer suede cushions, its geometric inner membrane design ensures a perfect seal for those tight bass-lines while permitting airflow so your ears don't get too stuffy.

The HarmonicDyne Poseidon is launched on Kickstarter at 10 am EDT on 12th Oct. The super early bird price starts from $279. After the campaign ends, the retail price will go up to $435. Moreover, some addons such as a portable carrying case, extra ear pads, and custom Tripowin cables will be offered to the campaign backers with exclusive discounts.
Add your own comment

3 Comments on HarmonicDyne Poseidon— A Beryllium-Killer Headphone is Launched on Kickstarter

#1
Operandi
Damn... audiophile pseudoscience bullshit is annoying.
Compared with beryllium, pure nickel is four times in density and two times in tensile strength. A diaphragm driver made of purified nickel is much stiffer and more responsive
Nickel is also orders of magnitude heavier than materials you'd normally use to make a driver diaphragm. In metals AL is used a lot because its readily available, and has a high strength to weight ratio. Sometimes Ti is used because it has some material characteristics that can be an advantage. Beryllium can be used and is way lighter but is poorly damped and is hard to work with. Not sure why you'd use Nickel but it seems like a poor choice.
Combined with the open-back design, the Poseidon delivers a frequency response of 10 Hz to 40 kHz, allowing listeners to feel the incredible connection and transparency with the music.
You can only hear 20-20,000Hz in the best case so anything more is waste of time and effort. Also, whats that response look like beyond 20k? Probably pretty shit so even though you couldn't hear it your dog would think it sounds like crap.
As a frequent choice of wood for making professional musical instruments, maple perfectly matches the new nickel diaphragm drivers because of its high responsiveness and acoustic projection. The solid maple housing allows emphasis of fundamental frequencies and quick decays, making for incredible note separation and clarity. On top of that, the sophisticated maple wood bespoke design casts a glamour over the headphone, making the Poseidon look as beautiful as it sounds.
Please... Heapdones or speakers, you'd never use a material that is going to actively contribute to the sound. Ideally you would want a material that is goint to be as acoustically dead and neutral possible. Hardwoods aren't the worst materials but they are not the best either. It performs fine and it looks really nice so its fine to use but claiming it somehow contributes positively to the sound is nonsense.
Posted on Reply
#2
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
OperandiDamn... audiophile pseudoscience bullshit is annoying.


Nickel is also orders of magnitude heavier than materials you'd normally use to make a driver diaphragm. In metals AL is used a lot because its readily available, and has a high strength to weight ratio. Sometimes Ti is used because it has some material characteristics that can be an advantage. Beryllium can be used and is way lighter but is poorly damped and is hard to work with. Not sure why you'd use Nickel but it seems like a poor choice.


You can only hear 20-20,000Hz in the best case so anything more is waste of time and effort. Also, whats that response look like beyond 20k? Probably pretty shit so even though you couldn't hear it your dog would think it sounds like crap.

Please... Heapdones or speakers, you'd never use a material that is going to actively contribute to the sound. Ideally you would want a material that is goint to be as acoustically dead and neutral possible. Hardwoods aren't the worst materials but they are not the best either. It performs fine and it looks really nice so its fine to use but claiming it somehow contributes positively to the sound is nonsense.
LOL don't go read some of the cable manufacturer's marketing then, you might get an aneurysm. For what it's worth, the nickel used here is a coating on what I imagine is a mylar base. The entire diaphragm is not pure nickel, makes little sense as you said.
Posted on Reply
#3
Operandi
VSGFor what it's worth, the nickel used here is a coating on what I imagine is a mylar base. The entire diaphragm is not pure nickel, makes little sense as you said.
My point is you wouldn't use it at all. The whole point of using something like beryllium is the strength to weight advantage of the material. Materialistically there is no reason to use nickel in any sort of audio transducer that I'm aware of.
VSGLOL don't go read some of the cable manufacturer's marketing then, you might get an aneurysm.
Yeah I know what to stay away from in the audio world and the marketing behind these headphones is right up there cryogenic cables, and using medical grade receptacles to power your audio equipment.
Posted on Reply