Monday, November 15th 2021

Valve's Arch Linux-based SteamOS 3.0 to be Available to Public as a Standalone Distribution

As Valve is preparing to launch its handheld gaming console called Steam Deck, the company is investing a lot of resources into the software side of things. Powering the console is the company's custom SteamOS distribution, a modification of Arch Linux in today's form. In previous releases, Valve has been pushing its SteamOS as a modification of Debian Linux. However, that version didn't get updated in over two years, and the last release happened with version 2.195. When the Steam Deck console lands in the consumer's hands, we are supposed to see a new version of SteamOS, called SteamOS 3.0, become available for the public to download as any standalone Linux distribution.

With the release of 3.0, the company is switching to a rolling release OS embedded with bells and whistles to make gaming on Linux a viable option. All that is needed to fire up Steam and start gaming is already pre-installed, and you can get the same Steam Deck experience on your PC or any device that can run Linux. The moment this becomes available to the public, we will update you with more information.
Source: via 9to5Linux
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41 Comments on Valve's Arch Linux-based SteamOS 3.0 to be Available to Public as a Standalone Distribution

#1
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
I'll happily throw this on my laptop if i can do steam streaming from my desktop to it
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#2
lynx29
This is great news, I hope it has native freesync / gsync support built in. Linux Mint does now...
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#3
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
lynx29This is great news, I hope it has native freesync / gsync support built in. Linux Mint does now...
Seriously? Mint is going up in the world
Posted on Reply
#4
employee24601
MusselsSeriously? Mint is going up in the world
+1!
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#5
zlobby
Good luck with the drivers on the PC side.
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#6
Ferrum Master
This is so wrong and useless on many fronts.

KDE + Wayland isn't ready yet. It is quite useless atm you have to use raw betas, that are unstable also. The combinations of what works and doesn't. The video driver binary blobs.. ugh... it looks ugly tbh.

While AMD has released UEFI CPPC2 CPU driver code in September, it ain't really shipping into mainstream kernel yet... Linux doesn't know which cores to boost it you have Ryzen 5000+ CPU.
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#7
5 o'clock Charlie
I have not followed SteamOS since it's inception. I recalled the OS was based on the Debian kernel from the start. When did they switch to Arch Linux?
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#8
Ferrum Master
5 o'clock CharlieI have not followed SteamOS since it's inception. I recalled the OS was based on the Debian kernel from the start. When did they switch to Arch Linux?
Dude kernel is a kernel, distro is a distro.
Posted on Reply
#9
Ravenas
I'm ready. There are some proprietary drivers included with their distro. I have been using Manjaro for a while now, will switch once 3.0 clockwerk is made available. Arch based will give them more control of their distro, versus debian based rolling releasing and lack of control.

AMD open-source drivers are amazing, and I'm getting better average FPS than on Windows 11 / 10. I'm glad they switch to Arch, pacman AUR is the way of the future, and giving users the option to choose kernel is great. I prefer KDE over gnome as well, although any user could download gnome DE if they choose.

For Linux beginners, there are some advantages to apt based because of the vast documentation out there. Pop_OS! is a great Linux distro to start with, the strict systemd approach they take will drive some crazy for not using grub.
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#10
Thribits
5 o'clock CharlieI have not followed SteamOS since it's inception. I recalled the OS was based on the Debian kernel from the start. When did they switch to Arch Linux?
The Kernel is mostly the same for all distros.

It was based on Debian in the past but i partially died off because valve gave up on developing it. For the Steam Deck they changed it to being arch based.
Posted on Reply
#11
Ravenas
ThribitsThe Kernel is mostly the same for all distros.

It was based on Debian in the past but i partially died off because valve gave up on developing it. For the Steam Deck they changed it to being arch based.
Valve stopped at version 2.195 as far as releases (the last debian based update). There was a version bump recorded in April 2019 & July 2019 after I posted an issue github.com/ValveSoftware/SteamOS/issues/674 from 2.194 to 2.195. Months later GamerOS was forked.

Valve has not given up on development, 3.0 has been in development since mid 2019 at least. The repositories were being updated with Clockwerk since that time.
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#12
Nordic
The really exciting piece about the steam deck is not the hardware, but the software. Valve is making gaming on Linux enjoyable, not the semi functional mess it used to be. There is still a lot of room to grow Linux gaming.
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#13
Ferrum Master
NordicThere is still a lot of room to grow Linux gaming.
For sure...

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#14
Lucas_
Ferrum MasterFor sure...

hahaha. nice one.
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#15
R-T-B
ThribitsThe Kernel is mostly the same for all distros.
No, not really. Some lag way behind. Arch is more cutting edge.
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#16
Ravenas
R-T-BNo, not really. Some lag way behind. Arch is more cutting edge.
You can regress. Some custom kernels contain different things such a power management changes.
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#17
R-T-B
RavenasYou can regress. Some custom kernels contain different things such a power management changes.
Yes, there are custom patches as well. That really just drives my point home that all kernels are not the same though.
Posted on Reply
#18
Ferrum Master
R-T-BYes, there are custom patches as well. That really just drives my point home that all kernels are not the same though.
Those are the best... making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already :D I don't even want to start whining about it... it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I've used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don't know... maybe it doesn't use Wayland and it is safe... for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven't poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn't touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past... IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it... almost.
Posted on Reply
#19
R-T-B
Ferrum MasterThose are the best... making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already :D I don't even want to start whining about it... it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I've used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don't know... maybe it doesn't use Wayland and it is safe... for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven't poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn't touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past... IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it... almost.
nvidia and wayland are horrid bed partners. AMD works fine, or at least better.
Posted on Reply
#21
zlobby
R-T-BNo, not really. Some lag way behind. Arch is more cutting edge.
In software 'cutting edge' often is a synonym with 'insufficiently tested' and 'don't deploy on mission critical systems'.
Posted on Reply
#22
R-T-B
zlobbyIn software 'cutting edge' often is a synonym with 'insufficiently tested' and 'don't deploy on mission critical systems'.
Didn't say otherwise.
Posted on Reply
#23
zlobby
Ferrum MasterThose are the best... making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already :D I don't even want to start whining about it... it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I've used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don't know... maybe it doesn't use Wayland and it is safe... for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven't poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn't touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past... IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it... almost.
And this is in short why Linux is far from the OS for the general PC user. More so, it even makes it vulnerable to predatory practices like M$' EEE.
Posted on Reply
#24
Ferrum Master
zlobbyIn software 'cutting edge' often is a synonym with 'insufficiently tested' and 'don't deploy on mission critical systems'.
The attenuation to word Cutting... fingers
zlobbyAnd this is in short why Linux is far from the OS for the general PC user. More so, it even makes it vulnerable to predatory practices like M$' EEE.
For sure... and nothing signals it will be different.
Posted on Reply
#25
Ravenas
Ferrum MasterThose are the best... making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already :D I don't even want to start whining about it... it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I've used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don't know... maybe it doesn't use Wayland and it is safe... for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven't poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn't touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past... IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it... almost.
I've used KDE and nvidia's proprietary drives, wasn't a problem. At least on kubuntu.
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