Thursday, November 18th 2021

AMD Expected to See 65 Percent Growth Rate in Sales for 2021, Intel Down One Percent

According to an industry report by IC Insights, AMD will see a yearly growth rate of no less than 65 percent this year, compared to 2020, whereas Intel is expected to have a slightly negative growth rate of one percent. The report includes the top 25 semiconductor sales leaders, ranked by growth rate, although it should be pointed out that some of them are foundries and not just semiconductor companies.

AMD is closely followed by MediaTek, which is expected to reach a 60 percent growth rate this year, followed by Nvidia at 54 percent and Qualcomm and 51 percent growth. The only surprise in the top five is PRC based SMIC, which saw a 39 percent growth this year, despite, or maybe because of the US sanctions against various Chinese IC makers.
Somewhat surprisingly, all things considered, TSMC is only number 15 on the list, with an expected growth rate of 24 percent. This puts all of its major competitors ahead of it, with Samsung at 7th place, GlobalFoundries at 8th place and UMC at 13th place. Out of the 25 companies listed, only Intel and Sony are expected to have a negative growth rate this year, at one and three percent respectively. Both companies have suffered from supply problems, with Sony having been unable to deliver enough PlayStation 5's to meet demand.

Apple's supply problems seems to have affected them somewhat negatively too, as they only end up at 20th place, with an expected growth rate of 17 percent. The top European company is NXP at 11th place, with the top Japanese entry being Kioxia at 21st place. Although these are estimates, it's unlikely that much will change with less than a month and a half left of the year.
Source: IC Insights
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13 Comments on AMD Expected to See 65 Percent Growth Rate in Sales for 2021, Intel Down One Percent

#2
qcmadness
RichardsAnalysis is guessing...
3 results out of 4 quarters have been published.
Posted on Reply
#3
DeathtoGnomes
Too bad for Intel, they thought they really had something with A. Pond.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheGuruStud
DeathtoGnomesToo bad for Intel, they thought they really had something with A. Pond.
Well, they no doubt lose money on every single AL sold.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
DeathtoGnomesToo bad for Intel, they thought they really had something with A. Pond.
They have, but AL obviously can't boost their sales for the first 3 quarters.

AMD deserves every % they got.

And I'm not sure about MediaTek. Weren't these the guys most eager to game benchmarks and drop software support?
Posted on Reply
#6
user556
Hehe, yeah, a lot of guessing. Here's mine: TSMC is the one that is supply constrained and shows it by not being right at the top of the list. Intel, on the other hand, is finally over its supply problems but had to slash prices to keep any turnover, and thereby didn't gain on revenue.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheinsanegamerN
So we have massive supply restrictions and yet these companies are booming like its the 90s again.

Something doesnt add up.
Posted on Reply
#8
user556
AMD and nVidia have both been on a sell the high priced parts only arrangement ever since Covid hit. So their shipped volumes may have even gone down. That explains them easy enough.

Also, supply constrained doesn't necessarily mean there is less supply. It can mean demand shot up.
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
TheinsanegamerNSo we have massive supply restrictions and yet these companies are booming like its the 90s again.

Something doesnt add up.
Why doesn't it add up? As long as there's demand, you sell your goods for more. Economics 101.
Posted on Reply
#10
Pilgrim
DeathtoGnomesToo bad for Intel, they thought they really had something with A. Pond.
:roll: A. Pond! LOL
Posted on Reply
#11
ARF
bugWhy doesn't it add up? As long as there's demand, you sell your goods for more. Economics 101.
Virtual demand for goods that physically don't exist?
Do, what does AMD sell if the stores' shelves are empty?

No graphics cards, for example.
Posted on Reply
#12
bug
ARFVirtual demand for goods that physically don't exist?
Do, what does AMD sell if the stores' shelves are empty?

No graphics cards, for example.
Demand for the SKUs that actually exist. Geez...
If you followed news, you'd know that GPU makers reported they actually made 10-15% more GPUs than last year.
Posted on Reply
#13
Nephilim666
Some weird rationale by some who are unwilling to backorder and can't go out and buy something off a shelf: "so it mustn't exist"
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