Friday, December 17th 2021

2022 LG Ultrafine OLED Pro Monitors for Creatives Set New Standards for Picture Quality

LG Electronics USA is once again setting higher expectations for professional-grade display solutions with the announcement of its 2022 LG UltraFineTM OLED Pro monitors (models 32BP95E, 27BP95E). Delivering the advantages of OLED's self-lit pixels to the desktop, the monitors provide the accurate color reproduction and superb HDR and SDR performance that professional visual effects artists, video editors and other creative industry roles demand.

LG's newest 32- and 27-inch OLED Pro models delivers 4K UHD resolution (3,840 x 2,160) screens with a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio and 99 percent coverage of the DCI-P3 color gamut, making them suitable for even the most detailed digital projects. Both new displays offer independent pixel control for impressive color fidelity and contrast and because OLED displays do not require backlighting, these UltraFine monitors are free of the distracting halo effect, or blooming, common on many LCD displays.
To ensure that these models display vibrant colors as intended under the conditions optimal for productivity, both OLED Pro monitors come with detachable self-calibration sensors and monitor hoods. When used with the free-to-download LG Calibration Studio software, the calibration sensor measures the light emitted from the display at times predetermined by the user and automatically makes the necessary adjustments to maintain a high degree of color accuracy and consistency. For even more color and image accuracy, the hood can be attached to prevent distracting reflections and glare from external light sources.

Both UltraFine OLED Pro displays offer slim, elegant form factors and are light weight for easy relocation to different rooms and desks. The included stand attaches securely to the rear of the display with a simple One-click mechanism and offers adjustability for height, pivot and tilt without sacrificing stability or style.

"Designed with creative professionals in mind, our new UltraFine OLED Pro monitors deliver sheer visual precision with stunning self-lit picture quality and reliable calibration," said Seo Young-jae, senior vice president and head of the IT business unit of LG Electronics Business Solutions Company. "The incredible accuracy, wide color gamut and ability to faithfully reproduce both HDR and SDR content make these premium display solutions ideal for professional users working in the film and digital media industries."

The new LG UltraFine OLED Pro monitors will be available in key markets worldwide starting next month.
Source: LG
Add your own comment

20 Comments on 2022 LG Ultrafine OLED Pro Monitors for Creatives Set New Standards for Picture Quality

#1
natr0n
Gonna be a long while till we get 240hz models. Using a 240 ips for now.
Posted on Reply
#2
TheLostSwede
natr0nGonna be a long while till we get 240hz models. Using a 240 ips for now.
These are not gaming monitors.
Posted on Reply
#3
watzupken
natr0nGonna be a long while till we get 240hz models. Using a 240 ips for now.
If you are already using a 240Hz panel, no reason to change it. Even if it exists, it will be priced out of most people's budget for a monitor. Currently, any monitor that is using mini LED or OLED. (including these) are already a few times more expensive than a good IPS monitor.
Posted on Reply
#4
Crackong
Samsung is going to have a 34 inch QD-OLED monitor
Is LG gonna respond with something?
Posted on Reply
#5
Vayra86
CrackongSamsung is going to have a 34 inch QD-OLED monitor
Is LG gonna respond with something?
QD OLED is just an LCD. Why would they?

Let's see what that is actually going to be ;) Its misty as hell, that tech... and Samsung isn't exactly known for not misleading us with display tech. I genuinely hope they found the monitor OLED grail... but let's see.

Either way its fantastic to see OLED in smaller display diagonals. Now we're getting somewhere.
Posted on Reply
#6
Chomiq
Vayra86QD OLED is just an LCD. Why would they?
QD-OLED has blue OLED backlight with QD layer on top of it.
CrackongSamsung is going to have a 34 inch QD-OLED monitor
Is LG gonna respond with something?
LG won't respond because they're not the ones making the panels for this monitor. JOLED is the panel manufacturer.
Posted on Reply
#7
Arpeegee
Nice to see smaller OLED models, shouldn't be difficult to make 120hz equivalents next year or so for gaming. Odd that it only gets HDR 400 certification for an OLED at 60hz, since it's meant for professionals you would think it would be hitting the top HDR 1000 or at least higher than 400.
Posted on Reply
#8
mashie
Any hint of pricing for these?
Posted on Reply
#9
Arrakis9
mashieAny hint of pricing for these?
my guess is around the 1k-1500 mark.
Posted on Reply
#10
Dammeron
Arrakis9my guess is around the 1k-1500 mark.
Considering the current LG 32" OLED goes for ~4000$, I wouldn't count on prices below 2k. Which makes it weird, cause You can get a 48" C1 OLED for around 1200$.
Posted on Reply
#11
trsttte
DammeronConsidering the current LG 32" OLED goes for ~4000$, I wouldn't count on prices below 2k. Which makes it weird, cause You can get a 48" C1 OLED for around 1200$.
Different markets different prices, consumer electronic are always a lot cheaper than "pro" branded stuff.

I have no interest in oled, maybe the samsung qd-oled stuff changes things, I have no interest in a disposable monitor (regular oled)
Posted on Reply
#12
Minus Infinity
Vayra86QD OLED is just an LCD. Why would they?

Let's see what that is actually going to be ;) Its misty as hell, that tech... and Samsung isn't exactly known for not misleading us with display tech. I genuinely hope they found the monitor OLED grail... but let's see.

Either way its fantastic to see OLED in smaller display diagonals. Now we're getting somewhere.
Read the fine print. OLED not QLED!
Posted on Reply
#13
Vayra86
Minus InfinityRead the fine print. OLED not QLED!
I did and you might be surprised, we discussed this at length in the news piece about it some time ago.

theappliancesreviews.com/the-evolution-of-qled-and-oled-technologies-in-hybrid-qd-oled-technology/amp/

Some TL DR : QD Oled will have higher brightness and uses only a self emissive blue light source. The QD filter does the rest. So it remains to be seen how the image compares to LG OLED. Could be a winner. Could also just be yet another poor contrast panel. Its already known the black in QD Oled is not 'zero light' and static contrast is not infinite.
Posted on Reply
#14
R-T-B
Vayra86Its already known the black in QD Oled is not 'zero light' and static contrast is not infinite.
Is that already known?

I mean LG OLED is a white OLED with a color filter sandwich, which shouldn't be any different and yet it has a perfect net zero black.
Posted on Reply
#15
Vayra86
R-T-BIs that already known?

I mean LG OLED is a white OLED with a color filter sandwich, which shouldn't be any different and yet it has a perfect net zero black.
Samsung said so itself, quoting lower contrast ratios, despite higher supposed peak brightness claims.
Posted on Reply
#16
R-T-B
Vayra86Samsung said so itself, quoting lower contrast ratios, despite higher supposed peak brightness claims.
Well the manufacturer would probably know. I'm just curious the technical reason. Must have some kind of film bleed.
Posted on Reply
#17
mechtech
What is the upper refresh rate of OLED panels?
Posted on Reply
#18
R-T-B
mechtechWhat is the upper refresh rate of OLED panels?
The controllers currently present them at 4k 120hz native due mostly to bandwidth limits but the panels are 240hz capable if they wished to expose it, IIRC.
Posted on Reply
#19
Vayra86
R-T-BWell the manufacturer would probably know. I'm just curious the technical reason. Must have some kind of film bleed.
We don't know what the specs of the blue OLED are. Personally, I think Samsung is working with much larger pixels in the OLED layer, and the QD film is pixel-level. After all, why not? And this way you have a way around yield issues on the OLEDs themselves. Larger is easier, cheaper also to run higher amounts of power through, which also explains the higher brightness range. Samsung was already experimenting with microLED and they similarly had issues with going smaller.

Larger OLED also would explain why black isn't black, the OLEDs don't turn off per pixel, but would probably be more akin to local dimming/zones.
Posted on Reply
#20
mechtech
R-T-BThe controllers currently present them at 4k 120hz native due mostly to bandwidth limits but the panels are 240hz capable if they wished to expose it, IIRC.
120Hz is perfect IMO. And at 4k that’s the icing on the cake!
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment