Wednesday, December 22nd 2021

LG's Award Winning Premium Monitors Designed With Modern Home-Office Workers in Mind

Designed to meet the needs of professional users world-over, LG's newest premium monitors for 2022 will make their debut at LG's CES 2022 virtual press conference on January 4. Both the LG UltraFine Display (model 32UQ85R) and LG DualUp Monitor (model 28MQ780) offer sleek and practical designs, enhanced connectivity and superior user experience for both home and office workers, including creative professionals and programmers. With peerless picture quality, powerful performance, customizability and convenience, it is no surprise that these solutions both took home CES 2022 Innovation Awards.

The new LG UltraFine Display is a professional-quality monitor designed with the needs of art directors, graphic designers, photo/video editors and live streamers in mind. Its 32-inch 4K UHD (3,840 x 2,160) resolution Nano IPS Black panel boasts a 2,000:1 contrast ratio and 98 percent coverage of the DCI-P3 color gamut, ensuring deep blacks and vibrant colors that remain true across a wide viewing angle in various ambient conditions. LG's first Nano IPS Black panel empowers the LG UltraFine Display to deliver realistic and nuanced black tones, adding more depth to images and allowing creators to realize their visions with advanced precision.
To maintain the level of color accuracy required by today's creatives, the LG UltraFine Display comes with a detachable auto self-calibration sensor. Calibration can be easily scheduled via LG's intuitive software, saving users time by performing this critical calibration automatically.

Two is Always Better Than One
A multitasking powerhouse ideal for all kinds of tasks such as content creation and coding, the LG DualUp Monitor features a Nano IPS display with a unique 16:18 aspect ratio - a completely new format in the monitor market. The innovative Square Double QHD (2,560 x 2,880) resolution monitor offers the same screen real estate as two 21.5-inch displays and has a vertical split view function that lets users see more in one glance. Boosting productivity and convenience, the LG 28MQ780 elevates user comfort with the ultra-adjustable LG Ergo stand which saves space as it clamps securely to most desks and tables. The double height screen of the LG DualUp Monitor additionally helps reduce side-to-side head movements, the main cause of neck pain.

"LG's premium monitors for 2022 deliver the picture quality, features and usability that can satisfy the needs of both professional and home users," said Seo Young-jae, senior vice president and head of the IT business unit of LG Electronics Business Solutions Company. "These CES Innovation Award winning-products are examples of our commitment to explore new form factors and functionalities to expand and strengthen our flagship monitor lineup."
Source: LG
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23 Comments on LG's Award Winning Premium Monitors Designed With Modern Home-Office Workers in Mind

#1
Lwerewolf
"Deep Black from Sides: Yes"
Is this finally the return of the A-TW polarizer or what?
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#2
TheLostSwede
Lwerewolf"Deep Black from Sides: Yes"
Is this finally the return of the A-TW polarizer or what?
LG's first Nano IPS Black panel empowers the LG UltraFine Display to deliver realistic and nuanced black tones, adding more depth to images and allowing creators to realize their visions with advanced precision.
It's not clear what that means. I guess we'll find out in due time.
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#3
W1zzard
The DualUp monitor does seem like an interesting concept
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#4
Vayra86
That form factor, lol. Looks... different. For the sake of being different.

What's more interesting is somehow LG can get IPS to 2000:1 static contrast now? That's quite the game changer for IPS.
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#5
Chomiq
Vayra86That form factor, lol. Looks... different. For the sake of being different.

What's more interesting is somehow LG can get IPS to 2000:1 static contrast now? That's quite the game changer for IPS.
2000:1 on an IPS, that's witchcraft! It's probably 60 Hz only.
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#6
TheLostSwede
Vayra86That form factor, lol. Looks... different. For the sake of being different.
Or you know, it's two 2560x1440 displays stacked on top of each other in a single display.
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#7
Chomiq
TheLostSwedeIt's not clear what that means. I guess we'll find out in due time.
Finally, they’re working on the ‘IPS Black’ technology. There isn’t much information available about it yet, but it’s supposed to improve blacks on their IPS panels as the name suggests.
Source: www.displayninja.com/new-monitors/
That's the only thing I could find, which is basically nothing.

It would be fun on a 144 Hz unit with HDR1000 with proper local dimming.
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#8
Vayra86
TheLostSwedeOr you know, it's two 2560x1440 displays stacked on top of each other in a single display.
Yes, that's what it is. Your point? :P

I'm kinda wondering if there is practical advantage there, because you have no widescreen so its more single-purpose than a 16:9 with 2560x1440 which offers the same *height*, if you can just rotate it 90 degrees.
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#9
TheLostSwede
Vayra86Yes, that's what it is. Your point? :p

I'm kinda wondering if there is practical advantage there, because you have no widescreen so its more single-purpose than a 16:9 with 2560x1440 which offers the same *height*, if you can just rotate it 90 degrees.
It's hardly just for the sake of being different, it's obviously for people that use multiple displays and want something a bit more compact and space saving.
You're clearly not a multi-monitor user and don't understand the benefit. I use my 4K display as two 1080p screens in one when I work, as I use two windows side by side. This would be like having two 1440p stacked on top of each other and for work, it's most definitely something I'd consider, depending on the price.
You can not rotate two 1440p screens and get this, I think you're not looking at this right if that's your conclusion, as this is a 16:18 aspect ratio display.
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#10
Vayra86
TheLostSwedeIt's hardly just for the sake of being different, it's obviously for people that use multiple displays and want something a bit more compact and space saving.
You're clearly not a multi-monitor user and don't understand the benefit. I use my 4K display as two 1080p screens in one when I work, as I use two windows side by side. This would be like having two 1440p stacked on top of each other and for work, it's most definitely something I'd consider, depending on the price.
You can not rotate two 1440p screens and get this, I think you're not looking at this right if that's your conclusion, as this is a 16:18 aspect ratio display.
You're saying it, and I'm trying to picture this, but I really can't. I use my ultrawide as a dual 1440p height monitor too and I use separate dual monitors for work. Win Key is my best friend for snapping windows to half the monitor. I would certainly not fancy having two windows top/bottom and then still using a left > right workflow, because that's what you have there. You don't get extra vertical real estate if you use this to 'multi-monitor'.

Also, side-by-side allows per-line comparisons, for example for programming. Top/bottom does not.

16:18 is a recipe for shit ergonomics. How are you going to align this monitor top to eye level height? And then prevent bending forward to read the bottom half? And for what reason, so you can 'save space' in desktop width? I get the portrait mode, I get the need for additional height on a widescreen, hence the option to rotate is useful. But 16:18 is neither, really.

And here's another problem. Pixel density versus real estate versus view distance. If you are really splitting this into two windows stacked on top of each other, I doubt 100% scaling is going to be optimal. There is no way you're going to tilt the screen so everything is about the same view distance away from you, another ergonomic workspace conflict, because you're again going to be bending towards your screen if you tilt bottom forward, or get neck strain if you tilt top forward.
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#11
TheLostSwede
Vayra86You're saying it, and I'm trying to picture this, but I really can't. I use my ultrawide as a dual 1440p height monitor too and I use separate dual monitors for work. Win Key is my best friend for snapping windows to half the monitor. I would certainly not fancy having two windows top/bottom and then still using a left > right workflow, because that's what you have there. You don't get extra vertical real estate if you use this to 'multi-monitor'.

Also, side-by-side allows per-line comparisons, for example for programming. Top/bottom does not.

16:18 is a recipe for shit ergonomics. How are you going to align this monitor top to eye level height? And then prevent bending forward to read the bottom half? And for what reason, so you can 'save space' in desktop width? I get the portrait mode, I get the need for additional height on a widescreen, hence the option to rotate is useful. But 16:18 is neither, really.

And here's another problem. Pixel density versus real estate versus view distance. If you are really splitting this into two windows stacked on top of each other, I doubt 100% scaling is going to be optimal. There is no way you're going to tilt the screen so everything is about the same view distance away from you, another ergonomic workspace conflict, because you're again going to be bending towards your screen if you tilt bottom forward, or get neck strain if you tilt top forward.
I'm not a programmer, so per line comparison isn't really helpful for me. Top/down would work better for what I do, since I mostly create text based content, so source up top and text editor at the bottom makes more sense to me than side by the side like I work now, especially as both windows would be 2560x1440.

I have a height adjustable monitor and still need an extra stand for it to get it to eye level, so not sure how this is shit ergonomics, as at least you won't have to turn your head left and right all the time. The centre of my display is the one area I don't use, which in the case of 16:18 is likely to be more used, since the split wouldn't be in the middle. I guess having started out with 5:4 displays, I'm used to square-ish displays...
Rotating a display tends to mess up all kinds of things, so no thanks. I have never had any real use of doing that, except the odd screenshot.

You seem to have a lot of concerns about issue that aren't really issues imho. No-one will force you to buy one, so...
That said, it's most definitely not for everyone.
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#12
docnorth
Well we already have premium monitors with LG (unfortunately) panel inside, they are called EIZO.
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#13
kieguru
That square monitor looks really good, nice to see a change that can be useful. Just a shame that it's only 300nits, would be great if it hit 600.
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#14
bug
Putting DisplayHDR400 on one and HDR10 on the other(s)... Doesn't get more disingenuous that that.
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#15
Wirko
2880 x 2560? Take away 320 vertical pixels for toolbars etc. and what remains is a square work area. That can be very useful for several specific things like GIS and CAD and spreadsheets - and some people do that most of their working hours.

The choice for those who need or want such a monitor is also extremely restricted - they can get either a 27-inch 1:1 Eizo or a 28-inch 3:2 Huawei, and the latter doesn't even allow rotation.
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#16
AnarchoPrimitiv
I'd like to take three of those DualUp monitors and make a multi-monitor setup for gaming/racing sim....a 7680x2880 resolution? That sounds good....better yet, how about a 5x1 multi-monitor setup with a 12,800x2880 combined resolution? That'd be pretty sick if you debezeled all the monitors and created a custom mount with the panels as close together as possible. That might be even better than my previous dream multi-monitor setup, 5x1 with 3440x1440 monitors in portrait mode for a combined resolution of 7200x3440
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#17
Logoffon
It's just stupid that they disclosed nearly entirety of both monitors' specs but ended up omitting one part...
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#18
Minus Infinity
IMO that guy is sitting way too close to the monitor.

Who is going to be the first to serve up a 16:10 or even 15:10 4K monitor. Give me a 32" 3840 x 2400, HD10+, 100% aRGB, 100% DCI-P3, 90Hz monitor, with micro-LED and <5ms GTG and I'm in.
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#19
lemonadesoda
Love the LG DualUp Square Double QHD (2,560 x 2,880). So long as they make a suitable stand that can be placed ON a desk rather than requiring drilling THROUGH the desk, or clipping on the back.

Finally. I've waited 20 years for a decent monitor designed for reading PDF documents, or authoring Portrait A4 documents. And spreadsheets. And news sites... or webforums... more content on one screen without scrolling.

Nice. Sell it to me at a good price.
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#20
bug
lemonadesodaLove the LG DualUp Square Double QHD (2,560 x 2,880). So long as they make a suitable stand that can be placed ON a desk rather than requiring drilling THROUGH the desk, or clipping on the back.

Finally. I've waited 20 years for a decent monitor designed for reading PDF documents, or authoring Portrait A4 documents. And spreadsheets. And news sites... or webforums... more content on one screen without scrolling.

Nice. Sell it to me at a good price.
It looks interesting, but I'm thinking there must be a reason the vast majority of dual screen workplaces organize them side by side. Looking up and down just seems more tiresome than looking left and right.
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#21
TheLostSwede
bugIt looks interesting, but I'm thinking there must be a reason the vast majority of dual screen workplaces organize them side by side. Looking up and down just seems more tiresome than looking left and right.
It's easier to move your eyes up and down than your neck left and right, no?
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#22
bug
TheLostSwedeIt's easier to move your eyes up and down than your neck left and right, no?
Idk how big these are in real life, I assumed you'd still be moving your neck. Human field of vision is much wider on the horizontal after all.
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#23
TheLostSwede
bugIdk how big these are in real life, I assumed you'd still be moving your neck. Human field of vision is much wider on the horizontal after all.
27.8-inches diagonally...
Your periphery vision is just that though.
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