Wednesday, March 9th 2022

SGS certifies exceptional performance of Samsung QD-Display

As an industry leader in the premium display market, Samsung Display today announced that its QD (Quantum Dot)-Display, a display suited for a variety of consumer needs, received two additional certifications for Pro Gaming Verified and Eye Care Display. Awarded by SGS, the world-leading certification company, QD-Display received high marks for its outstanding image quality and viewing experience for games and high-definition content, while simultaneously reducing eye stress and fatigue. Previously, the QD-Display received three certifications for its True Color Tones, Pure RGB Luminance and Ultrawide Viewing Angle.

Through the SGS evaluation, the QD-Display received the highest rating level, Platinum, in Pro Gaming Verified in reflectance, refresh rate, viewing angle, Halo (light leakage) and color. QD-Display offers a fast 0.1 ms response speed (Gray to Gray). Additionally, through the certification processes, the QD-Display was proven to achieve a 0.01 ms response speed (Black to White), and a refresh rate of 175 Hz for monitors and 144 Hz for TVs. Unlike conventional LCD displays, QD-Displays do not have a delay time due to the movement of liquid crystals, since each pixel can be individually adjusted to provide the sharpest image quality possible. Therefore, the QD-Display offers faster screen transitions and clearer picture quality, allowing users to fully immerse themselves in high-resolution games.
"The need for high-quality monitors has increased substantially as we've spent more working and leisure time at home since the start of the pandemic," says Samsung Display. "We pride ourselves on the fact that QD-Display is the perfect display for consumers looking for the best viewing experience whether they're participating in video calls or enjoying games and high-definition content."

Meanwhile, Dell Technologies will release the 'Alienware 34-inch Curved QD-OLED Gaming Monitor (AW3423DW)' equipped with the QD-Display in the U.S. on March 9. This product supports uninterrupted play and ultra-low latency streaming with a fast response speed and a high refresh rate of 175 Hz. It is also equipped with a curved panel with 1800R curvature. At the back of the monitor, an OSD 5-Axis joystick is mounted in the center for easy setting and angle adjustment. In addition, it is equipped with TUV certified 'ComfortView Plus' that maintains eye comfort and 'Creator Mode' that allows content creators or game developers to freely specify DCI-P3 and sRGB color gamut.

The QD-Display also received the Eye Care Display certification after demonstrating that harmful blue light emissions from monitors with QD-Displays were less than 11.5%, which is lower than alternative 31.5-inch or larger gaming monitor displays.

Samsung Display emphasized, "Based on the evaluation, QD-Displays are a great option if you want to avoid eye strain. Even after long hours in front of the screen, users will still experience clear and sharp image quality and quick response speed comfortably - ideal for gamers and even graphic designers."
Source: Samsung Display
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36 Comments on SGS certifies exceptional performance of Samsung QD-Display

#1
Crackong
Still waiting for a 32 inch FLAT variant
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#3
Valantar
dgianstefaniKeep waiting, this looks great.
It does in terms of panel performance, but sadly the subpixel structure makes it a no-go for me. Fuzzy text is a deal-breaker in my use case.
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#4
ShurikN
Looks cool, looking forward to Tim's review
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#5
Wirko
ValantarIt does in terms of panel performance, but sadly the subpixel structure makes it a no-go for me. Fuzzy text is a deal-breaker in my use case.
Is it Pentile or something similarly weird? Even then, it would not be impossible to devise some kind of subpixel-aware font smoothing.
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#6
Tigger
I'm the only one
Awards mean expensive.
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#7
Xex360
ValantarIt does in terms of panel performance, but sadly the subpixel structure makes it a no-go for me. Fuzzy text is a deal-breaker in my use case.
Agreed, I don't understand how so called reviewers rate phones with fake 1080p screens highly like the s21/22 iPhones.
Having said so, I believe this monitor has a true resolution, rather it has blue OLEDs with a filter to get the colours.
Posted on Reply
#8
Tigger
I'm the only one
Xex360Agreed, I don't understand how so called reviewers rate phones with fake 1080p screens highly like the s21/22 iPhones.
Having said so, I believe this monitor has a true resolution, rather it has blue OLEDs with a filter to get the colours.
How does a s22 have a fake 1080 screen?
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#9
claster17
WirkoIs it Pentile or something similarly weird?
Not Pentile but also not regular RGB:
[MEDIA=imgur]m1L65Qi[/MEDIA]
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#10
noel_fs
shame i was in need of a monitor/screen last year so i had to get qled qn90a, really wanted to wait for qdoled
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#11
trsttte
claster17Not Pentile but also not regular RGB:
[MEDIA=imgur]m1L65Qi[/MEDIA]
Instead of having the RGB matrix lined up it has those triangles, does it make that much of a difference, especially when going for high ppi's?

I'd understand the concern if it was pentile (that would be garbage), but don't really get the criticism in this case
Posted on Reply
#12
Valantar
WirkoIs it Pentile or something similarly weird? Even then, it would not be impossible to devise some kind of subpixel-aware font smoothing.
The subpixels are arranged in a triangle pattern, there was a good photo of it in another thread. It's better than pentile as the pixels don't share any subpixels, but it's still not RGB stripe, and thus Windows will have trouble making it render sharp lines with high contrast. Such a weird choice.
trsttteInstead of having the RGB matrix lined up it has those triangles, does it make that much of a difference, especially when going for high ppi's?

I'd understand the concern if it was pentile (that would be garbage), but don't really get the criticism in this case
It still makes for fuzzier text and other high contrast lines due to the non-standard subpixel structure. It's not as bad as pentile, but still not acceptable for my use case, and certainly not in a $1300 display.

Edit: "high ppi" is also relative. The 111ppi of 3440*1600@34" is perfectly fine, better than average for desktop use, but it isn't particularly high.

Here's the post with the images:
ChomiqFirst impressions from Reddit user:
Monitors/comments/t75xwf
They're already available for order if you're signed up for Dell Premiere (or whatever it's called), official launch is March 9th in US.

Subpixel layout:


Compared to JOLED:
Non-square pixels with Non-square subpixel layouts make for non-sharp lines. And sadly no amount of mitigations will fully make up for it, in part because human vision is acutely tuned for edge and line contrast detection.
Posted on Reply
#13
trsttte
ValantarThe subpixels are arranged in a triangle pattern, there was a good photo of it in another thread. It's better than pentile as the pixels don't share any subpixels, but it's still not RGB stripe, and thus Windows will have trouble making it render sharp lines with high contrast. Such a weird choice.


It still makes for fuzzier text and other high contrast lines due to the non-standard subpixel structure. It's not as bad as pentile, but still not acceptable for my use case, and certainly not in a $1300 display.

Here's the post with the images:

Non-square pixels with Non-square subpixel layouts make for non-sharp lines. And sadly no amount of mitigations will fully make up for it, in part because human vision is acutely tuned for edge and line contrast detection.
I feel that might be way overblown, linear subpixel layouts like IPS are also not perfectly square and suffer from the same problem on anything that's not a straight horizontal/vertical line. That get's mitigated with antialiasing and higher ppi.

My phone like most phones today uses a 1080p pentile oled, i certainly don't spend as much time reading from it as I do from a computer monitor but I still see no difference from my previous phone with 1080p IPS (the differences I see are the amazing contrast and colour and higher refresh).

Feelings (like my own) don't mather though, is there concrete data on this that goes either way? (i'm not talking about pixel peeping, like a study with people comparing text for example or something)
Posted on Reply
#14
Xex360
TiggerHow does a s22 have a fake 1080 screen?
Unlike a 1080p LCDs screen that have ~ 2 millions of red, green and blue subpixels, pentile amoled have only 2 million green subpixels red and blue are less, the true resolution of an amoled is about 2/3 of an LCD.
It's not important at "1440p" but 1080 drops the real resolution too much.
Posted on Reply
#15
Tigger
I'm the only one
Xex360Unlike a 1080p LCDs screen that have ~ 2 millions of red, green and blue subpixels, pentile amoled have only 2 million green subpixels red and blue are less, the true resolution of an amoled is about 2/3 of an LCD.
It's not important at "1440p" but 1080 drops the real resolution too much.
An s22 has a bigger res than 1080 anyway
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#16
bug
A lot of praise and very little substance. What gamut does this really cover? What dynamic range? And more to the point: where does it stand in relation to OLED?
Posted on Reply
#17
Valantar
bugA lot of praise and very little substance. What gamut does this really cover? What dynamic range? And more to the point: where does it stand in relation to OLED?
It is an OLED; the first monitor using Samsung's new QD-OLED panels. There have been several news pieces on this monitor previously, which cover what you're asking about. This news piece is on a specific award it has received, so reiterating its specs would be rather odd in light of that.
Posted on Reply
#18
bug
ValantarIt is an OLED; the first monitor using Samsung's new QD-OLED panels. There have been several news pieces on this monitor previously, which cover what you're asking about. This news piece is on a specific award it has received, so reiterating its specs would be rather odd in light of that.
It's precisely because I read what has been released before why I know it's not a typical OLED. Everything so far was marketing material "it's gonna be the greatest ever". I want to see some attached number to this greatness.
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#19
TheLostSwede
bugIt's precisely because I read what has been released before why I know it's not a typical OLED. Everything so far was marketing material "it's gonna be the greatest ever". I want to see some attached number to this greatness.
Good thing it's up for sale and you can order one then and let us know how good or not it is. Looking forward to your review.
www.dell.com/en-us/member/shop/alienware-34-curved-qd-oled-gaming-monitor-aw3423dw/apd/210-bcye/monitors-monitor-accessories
Posted on Reply
#20
thunderingroar
the good thing about an ultrawide OLED is when the game doesnt support 21:9 aspect ratio (cough from software) you can still play 16:9 and instead of having annoying dark grey sidebars like on LCDs you ll just have perfect black sidebars which can easily be ignored if you re playing in a dark room
Posted on Reply
#21
Tigger
I'm the only one
The OSD 5-Axis joystick is on the bottom btw. Looks good this, i like Dell monitors always seem good, and my own is pretty nice.
Posted on Reply
#22
Chomiq
bugA lot of praise and very little substance. What gamut does this really cover? What dynamic range? And more to the point: where does it stand in relation to OLED?
It's a wide-gamut display:
149% sRGB (CIE 1931), 99.3% DCI-P3
In short, wider coverage of DCI-P3, brighter and more saturated colors. I see no info whether sRGB picture mode is available.

Hands on (the purple tint on display when off or no signal is the result of AG coating):
Posted on Reply
#23
TheLostSwede
ChomiqIt's a wide-gamut display:
149% sRGB (CIE 1931), 99.3% DCI-P3
In short, wider coverage of DCI-P3, brighter and more saturated colors. I see no info whether sRGB picture mode is available.

Hands on (the purple tint on display when off or no signal is the result of AG coating):
People really need to learn to flip their phones over when shooting video...
Posted on Reply
#24
trsttte
thunderingroarthe good thing about an ultrawide OLED is when the game doesnt support 21:9 aspect ratio (cough from software) you can still play 16:9 and instead of having annoying dark grey sidebars like on LCDs you ll just have perfect black sidebars which can easily be ignored if you re playing in a dark room
That's not that great long term as the middle OLEDs will degrade and loose brightness faster and before the side bands ("burn in is a myth" crowd come at me lol, it's not something you can really compensate for other than running the side bands alone to purposefully degrade them to the same level as the middle, may take more or less years to happen but it will happen)

And if ultra wide was at any point going to stop being the exception to the norm that would already happened by now.

Probably not a major issue, but something to keep in mind
Posted on Reply
#25
R-T-B
ValantarIt does in terms of panel performance, but sadly the subpixel structure makes it a no-go for me. Fuzzy text is a deal-breaker in my use case.
I agree. Even LGs pixel structure is preferable, though straight up RGB would be best.
trsttteThat's not that great long term as the middle OLEDs will degrade and loose brightness faster and before the side bands ("burn in is a myth" crowd come at me lol, it's not something you can really compensate for other than running the side bands alone to purposefully degrade them to the same level as the middle, may take more or less years to happen but it will happen)
That's actually pretty easy to deal with: grey sidebands. RGB half brightness. Nothing the autotune won't handle if ran like that.
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