Friday, May 13th 2022

Micron Delivers Client NVMe Performance and Value SSDs With Industry-Leading Capacity Sizes and QLC NAND

Micron Technology, Inc., today announced new client solid-state drives (SSDs) that bring NVMe performance to client computing applications, freeing laptops, workstations and other portables from legacy architectures that can rob devices of battery power, performance and productivity. The Micron 2300 SSD combines the power and density needed to drive compute-heavy applications in a compact form factor with the reduced power consumption modern mobile users demand. For the first time, Micron brings together NVMe performance and low-cost quad-level-cell (QLC) NAND in the Micron 2210 QLC SSD. It combines fast NVMe throughput and Micron's leadership in QLC technology to offer flash capabilities at hard disk drive-like price points while reducing power consumption by 15 times when compared to hard drives.

"Ninety percent of client platforms will ship NVMe SSDs within the next year, and the market is fast bifurcating into mainstream and value market segments," said Roger Peene, vice president of marketing, Storage Business Unit, Micron. "Our two new client SSDs, the 2300 and 2210, are optimized for each segment. The 2300 offers outstanding power performance, while the 2210 delivers compelling price performance by using Micron's industry-leading QLC NAND." Both SSDs introduced today are built on Micron's innovative 96-layer 3D NAND technology to deliver power savings, right-sized capacity and compact form factors that enable flexible designs. They also deliver enhanced client security features and capabilities for protecting data, with TCG Opal 2.0 and TCG Pyrite 2.0 support.
Micron 2300 Solid-State Drive with NVMe
The Micron 2300 SSD is designed for applications that demand high performance and industry-leading capacities in the popular M.2 form factor. Features include the ability to:
  • Maximize for data-intensive workloads encompassing CAD, graphical design and video editing for faster application load times and responsiveness.
  • Offer a wide range of capacity points, from 256 GB up to 2 TB.
  • Fit a broad set of desktop and mobile design needs with a small, dense, M.2 form factor (22x80).
  • Achieve up to 3,300 MB/s sequential reads and up to 2,700 MB/s sequential writes.
Micron 2210 QLC SSD with NVMe
The Micron 2210 SSD bridges the gap between the low cost of hard disk drives and the performance, reliability, low power and security of SSDs. It uses high-density, cost-efficient QLC architecture that Micron first brought to the data center. Features include the ability to:
  • Improve application load times and responsiveness with fast NVMe making it ideal for performance-sensitive applications where hard disk drives can't keep up.
  • Offer a wide range of capacity points from 512 GB up to 2 TB in the M.2 (22x80) form factor.
  • Provide a cache with greater write endurance and performance with innovative dynamic write acceleration that is optimized for QLC architecture.
  • Achieve up to 2,200 MB/s sequential reads and up to 1,800 MB/s sequential writes.
Both products are available now.
Source: Micron
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16 Comments on Micron Delivers Client NVMe Performance and Value SSDs With Industry-Leading Capacity Sizes and QLC NAND

#1
Chrispy_
The only thing that matters for the 2210 is the only thing they don't mention; Cost/TB.
Posted on Reply
#2
TheLostSwede
Chrispy_The only thing that matters for the 2210 is the only thing they don't mention; Cost/TB.
These aren't retail products though, these are the kind of SSDs you'll get in pre-built systems and notebooks.
Maybe Crucial will launch something similar, who knows, but then we'd get pricing.
Posted on Reply
#4
ExcuseMeWtf
LOL I got Kioxia Exceria 1TB at way cheaper than that and it's 3D TLC so it will def last longer than that lmao.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
Chrispy_The only thing that matters for the 2210 is the only thing they don't mention; Cost/TB.
Micron = OEM. These are not meant for retail.
IME their (Crucial) perf/$ is pretty hard to beat.
Posted on Reply
#6
Chrispy_
TheLostSwedeThese aren't retail products though, these are the kind of SSDs you'll get in pre-built systems and notebooks.
Maybe Crucial will launch something similar, who knows, but then we'd get pricing.
bugMicron = OEM. These are not meant for retail.
IME their (Crucial) perf/$ is pretty hard to beat.
I thought I read that Crucial wasn't making any more consumer stuff and it would all be branded Micron now. Or was that RAM only?
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
Chrispy_I thought I read that Crucial wasn't making any more consumer stuff and it would all be branded Micron now. Or was that RAM only?
Neither. They're not making any more Ballistix branded RAM.
Posted on Reply
#8
80251
Are QLC SSD's less reliable than TLC SSD's or do they just offer less performance?
Posted on Reply
#9
ExcuseMeWtf
Shorter lifespan due to less write cycles.
Posted on Reply
#11
bug
80251Are QLC SSD's less reliable than TLC SSD's or do they just offer less performance?
They're good enough to dump your videos or photos onto them. But considering TLC is down to about 1,000 p/e cycles and QLC, while unspecified, must be below that, you can't really buy a QLC drive with confidence for any sort of write intensive scenarios.
Posted on Reply
#12
Jokii
>Industry-Leading Capacity Sizes
>up to 2TB

Is this some kind of joke?

I'd love to see affordable 8+TB SSDs, though. They don't need to be very fast, I just want to replace the damn HDDs.
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
80251Are QLC SSD's less reliable than TLC SSD's or do they just offer less performance?
Both. Even the newest QLC is crap compared to TLC.
ExcuseMeWtfShorter lifespan due to more write cycles and higher voltage applied per write cycle.
Fixed that for you. QLC works by writing to a NAND cell 4 times with differing voltages each time, increasing with each stage of write.
TLC = 3 write cycles with 3 differential voltages.
QLC = 4 write cycles with 4 differential voltages.

This is why QLC can never be as durable as TLC and TLC can never be as durable as MLC, when using the same 3D manufacturing methods and formulations.
Posted on Reply
#14
trparky
lexluthermiesterThis is why QLC can never be as durable as TLC and TLC can never be as durable as MLC, when using the same 3D manufacturing methods and formulations.
And let's not forget that if the voltage inside the NAND flash cell drifts even a little bit, there's a chance for data corruption since you have to ask yourself is it a 0000, 0001, 0010, 0100, 1000, 1100, 1110, 1111, 1011... you get the idea. There are sixteen possible voltage states, which doesn't give you a lot of room for error in case a cell's voltage state drifts. TLC only has nine voltage states to keep track of.
Posted on Reply
#15
80251
Do QLC (or TLC I guess) utilize any CRC, checksums or parity to check for bad data?
Posted on Reply
#16
lexluthermiester
80251Do QLC (or TLC I guess) utilize any CRC, checksums or parity to check for bad data?
That depends on the NAND controller, but generally yes, there is some error correction happening.
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