Wednesday, May 4th 2005

NanoCoolers puts liquid metal in your PC

Most of you may not have heard of NanoCoolers yet. This company is a relatively young Startup(May 2002) who has been working on improving cooling technologies behind closed doors for quite some time.

Now the first details on their cool new products emerge:
The liquid metal has significant advantages over other single phase liquid solutions. The thermal and physical properties of the material give it the ability to cool extremely high heat fluxes. With its very low vapor pressure, the boiling point of the material is in excess of 2000°C. This provides the capability to cool extremely high power densities without the liquid-metal changing phase, removing power density as the limiting factor in cooling performance. The liquid metal is non-flammable, non-toxic and environmentally friendly. As a metal, the liquid is both highly thermally conductive and highly electrically conductive. The thermal conductivity makes it ideal for heat removal and dissipation. The electrical conductivity enables the use of electromagnetic pumps to propel the liquid.
We got our hands on a 16 page confidential presentation:

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86 Comments on NanoCoolers puts liquid metal in your PC

#1
Unregistered
Unregistered
electromagnetic pumps ... inside your case ... with hard drives
You know your hard drive has magnets in it to position the heads right? The hard drive motor has magnets in it too. :rolleyes:
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#2
Unregistered
If this liquid metal can really cool better than a high end water rig this new companys going to grow very fast.

Lower noise, lower temps, much more compact than water.........even if pretty expensive they'll sell very well.
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#3
Unregistered
According to the website

I had to look for a very long time, but it says Zr based alloy.

It cannot have Mercury becasue it is supposedly good for prostetics, which would mean that it couldnt have toxic materials in it.

I am interested as to where this technology will go. I wish they had more technical information about it, but the interviews are vague at the very best. I assume not everything is patented and they have some secrecy around it.
#4
Unregistered
With this kind of technology minitower ATX cases will be again in fashion
#5
Unregistered
It is Gallium, it says on the site, in their technology sections
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#6
Unregistered
sorry to step on your toes and all, but the safest nuclear reactors in the world (go canada!!!... well fine then, we don't like you either... bleh =P ) use deutronium (I think that's what it's called) which is heavy water... the Hydrogens in water each have a neutron, or something like that. Oh and I think this is a great idea, I know I'm investing in this company as soon as it goes public =D
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#7
Unregistered
for cars maybe?

i recon this liquid metal could be used in car 'liquid to air intercoolers' to give much better performance. woo hoo
#8
Unregistered
Unregistered
sorry to step on your toes and all, but the safest nuclear reactors in the world (go canada!!!... well fine then, we don't like you either... bleh =P ) use deutronium (I think that's what it's called) which is heavy water... the Hydrogens in water each have a neutron, or something like that. Oh and I think this is a great idea, I know I'm investing in this company as soon as it goes public =D
I believe deutronium is used to absorb radioactivity. Or to release neutrons for fission. Or something involving the fission, I don't remember what. It's not any better at cooling. And I think it's called deuterium, but whatever. You say "patato" (potato), I say "pototo."
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#9
Unregistered
Unregistered
electromagnetic pumps ... inside your case ... with hard drives
Everything that spins inside your computer uses some sort of electromagnet. The Fans...the harddrive itself....etc
#10
Unregistered
Well it could interfer with the other magnetic activites. and the hard drive is like a box with a very fast disc. storing memory as electro magnetic.. things. i don't know the word for it. anyways keep in mind on an average citizen virus infected PC the pumps will be VERY VERY small and the magnetic range will be EXTREMLY short. don't whine because my spelling is horrible! i'm still getting used to one of those "blank" keybords with funky springs and thinggs which by the way is $80
#11
Unregistered
Howsaboot no?

Unregistered
sorry to step on your toes and all, but the safest nuclear reactors in the world (go canada!!!... well fine then, we don't like you either... bleh =P ) use deutronium (I think that's what it's called) which is heavy water... the Hydrogens in water each have a neutron, or something like that. Oh and I think this is a great idea, I know I'm investing in this company as soon as it goes public =D
Not to belittle Canada any more than she already is...but the safest nuclear reactor title? Try the United States Navy. All those reactors on carriers and submarines, being operated by people as young as 21? No accidents? No nuclear-related deaths over the course of 50+ years? Sorry Canada.
#12
Unregistered
The LiquidMetal alloy is made of titanium, copper, nickel, zirconium, and beryllium. However, I fear it is probably unlikely to be the material used in this system, given that it has a melting point of approximately 400degC. However, if Intel keep making chips the way they did the P4, we could be well on our way ;)
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#13
Unregistered
nanoCoolers:
"With its patents still pending, NanoCoolers has declined to release details of the metal, except to say it's a mixture comprised predominately of gallium."

http://www.nanocoolers.com/newsroom_detail.php?news_id=16

Maybe it's me, but I couldn't find Gallium listed anywhere else, including their technology section, even when using their search system.....

However.....

US Patent No 6,658,861

"The system as recited in claim 1 wherein the liquid metal contained in the solid-fluid heat exchanger is selected from a group consisting of indium, gallium, mercury, bismuth tin alloy, bismuth lead alloy and sodium potassium eutectic alloy."

"In the preferred embodiment, the liquid metal carried by tube 309 is an alloy of gallium and indium. Preferred compositions comprise 65 to 75% by mass gallium and 20 to 25% indium. Materials such as tin, copper, zinc and bismuth may also be present in small percentages. One such preferred composition comprises 66% gallium, 20% indium, 11% tin, 1% copper, 1% zinc and 1% bismuth. Some examples of the commercially available Gain alloys include galistan--a concoction popular as a substitute for mercury (Hg) in medical applications, and newmerc. The various properties of Ga--In alloy make it desirable liquid metal for use in heat spreaders. The Ga--In alloy spans a wide range of temperature with high thermal and electrical conductivities. It has melting points ranging from -15.degree. C. to 30.degree. C. and does not form vapor at least upto 2000.degree. C. It is not toxic and is relatively cheap. It easily forms alloys with aluminum and copper. It is inert to polyimides, polycarbonates, glass, alumina, Teflon, and conducting metals such as tungsten, molybdenum, and nickel (thereby making these materials suitable for construction of tubes).

However, it is apparent to one skilled in the art that a number of other liquid metals may be used without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, liquid metals having high thermal conductivity, high electrical conductivity and high volumetric heat capacity can be used. Some examples of liquid metals that can be used in an embodiment of the invention include mercury, gallium, sodium potassium eutectic alloy (78% sodium, 22% potassium by mass), bismuth tin alloy (58% bismuth, 42% tin by mass), bismuth lead alloy (55% bismuth, 45% lead) etc. Bismuth based alloys are generally used at high temperatures (40 to 140.degree. C.). Pure indium can be used at temperatures above 156.degree. C. (i.e., the melting point of indium)."

Also see US Patent No 6,708,501

Well, I for one am still confused about the alloy they could possibly be using......;)
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#14
Unregistered
This was invented by Albert Einstein before WWII he and a couple of engineers
had a refridgerator company and they used an electromagnetic pump to circulate
liquid metal for cooling.
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#15
Thermopylae_480
Unregistered
sorry to step on your toes and all, but the safest nuclear reactors in the world (go canada!!!... well fine then, we don't like you either... bleh =P ) use deutronium (I think that's what it's called) which is heavy water... the Hydrogens in water each have a neutron, or something like that. Oh and I think this is a great idea, I know I'm investing in this company as soon as it goes public =D
Actually pebble bed reactors are currently safer I believe. They are self regulating requireing no control rods making a meltdown impossible, these reactors cool through natural convection. The fissonable material is contained within a graphite ball about the size of a base ball (Thousands of them). They just slowly fission away, giving ofs plenty of heat to generate power.

And may I remind you that even a properly constructed reactor designed in any of the older ways is perfectly safe. There have only one major and one minor accident, and there are thousands of reactors across the globe. Many former Soviet countries still however use reactors with the exact same design as Chernobyl with no other incidents. Chernobyl was a result of gross human error, not faulty design. Although the lack of a proper containment structure is worrisome. :(
Posted on Reply
#16
Unregistered
Don't be foolished by their advertisement

One story they didn't tell is the pump needs a 0.9 Tesla magnetic field to drive. Can you imagine how
HUGE that field is? Can you guarantee it will not damage your electronics?
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#17
Urlyin
Senior Moderator
Have any of you guys seen this from Sapphire? Cooler already using liquid metal :eek:
(ATI RADEON™ X850 XT Platinum Edition Chipset)

Turning the Ordinary Into Extraordinary!

Blizzard delivers the future of gaming with the RADEON X850 XT PE's ability to push blistering framerates, while keeping your tool cool via an industry first advent, LIQUID METAL COOLING solution! Built upon a liquid metal technology that is 65X more thermally conductive than water and requires no moving parts, the Blizzard is equipped with the definitive long term cooling solution for today and tomorrow's demanding enthusiast.
Here's the link
Posted on Reply
#18
wazzledoozle
requires no moving parts
I see 2 fans :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#19
Urlyin
Senior Moderator
wazzledoozle
I see 2 fans :rolleyes:
LOL ... I was wondering if anyone would catch that .... :D What is that about ... no moving parts my .... :eek: ...
Posted on Reply
#20
gR3iF
me and my dad a physic prof dont know what metall it could be rather than queck
Posted on Reply
#21
Unregistered
2 fans

the second fan is supposed to be redundant and not used in normal operation... have to see if it's true when the tests and reviews come out.
But remember, you need air moving to bleed heat off, if it's just standing, stale air then the heat just builds up, think about putting your computer inside a foot locker and closing it. Without a hole on one side to let air in, and on another to let air out, you'd just end up with a hot...hot hot hot foot locker and an instable computer.
#22
wazzledoozle
If it still has to have a fan, what is the point? Its still a big chunk of metal on your video card that has to be cooled. How about on-card refridgeration systems?
Posted on Reply
#23
Unregistered
gR3iF
me and my dad a physic prof dont know what metall it could be rather than queck
This reminds me of a saying...."You may be a college graduate, but your son is still an idiot"

Quiz Time

1) What does "physic" mean?
2) What is a "metall"?
3) What is "queck"? Definition: A word occurring in a corrupt passage of Bacon's Essays, and probably meaning, to stir, to move.
4) Why doesn't "dont" require an apostrophe?
5) Why don't people think to read previous posts?

P.S. Only the prototype model is supposed to contain fans, the final retail model is supposed to operate without the fans.

I got to get me one of these...
http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20031230/5ghz-01.html
#24
Unregistered
Believe me -- No matter what versions, it does need fans to take heat to the air! Liquid metal is just used to take heat from the chip!

Vorlaplex
This reminds me of a saying...."You may be a college graduate, but your son is still an idiot"

Quiz Time

1) What does "physic" mean?
2) What is a "metall"?
3) What is "queck"? Definition: A word occurring in a corrupt passage of Bacon's Essays, and probably meaning, to stir, to move.
4) Why doesn't "dont" require an apostrophe?
5) Why don't people think to read previous posts?

P.S. Only the prototype model is supposed to contain fans, the final retail model is supposed to operate without the fans.

I got to get me one of these...
http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20031230/5ghz-01.html
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