Friday, January 23rd 2009

EVGA Prepares Software-Control For GPU Voltages

Overclocking video cards has become a child's play these days, thanks to helpful software utilities that feature simple sliders to adjust clock speeds, test and apply overclocked parameters. Those serious about overclocking take to high-end cooling, and volt-modding. EVGA picked on a gray-area, where users should be given a level of control over the GPU's voltage. The company is known for taking initiatives in making performance control accessible to most users by providing easy to use utilities such as the EVGA Precision.

Now, the company is coming up with a nifty utility called the EVGA Voltage Tuner. Exclusive for registered users of EVGA GeForce GTX 200 series graphics cards, the utility allows a decent level of control over the GPU's voltage settings, within a range permissible by the GPU's BIOS. While this utility isn't an all out substitute to volt-modding, it allows for all the voltage tuning the default state of the graphics card's electrical components allow. A simple slider allows for adjusting the GPU core voltage with a resolution of milli-Volts. The results of using this utility are impressive, with a small voltage adjustment sending the maximum core overclock up by 100 MHz, a significant amount when it comes to GPUs. The first version of this utility is said to support GeForce GTX 260 (65nm), GeForce GTX 280 and GeForce GTX 295. Suceeding versions may expand the compatibility list to include some important graphics cards, namely GeForce GTX 285 and GTX 260 (55nm). The second and third screenshots below show a before&after scene of adjusting voltages using this utility.

Source: EVGA Forums
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37 Comments on EVGA Prepares Software-Control For GPU Voltages

#1
Selene
"EVGA has a strict no RMA policy when it comes to modded voltages/bios"

This is not true at all, I in the last year RMA'd a card that I changed the bios on, thats not what killed it, but it was not the BIOS that the card came with, and I could not change it back due to the card being dead.
I called EVGA told them what was going on, and bam 1 week later I had a new card, and shipping the out the old one.
Cost me $15.00 for ARMA and they paid shipping both ways.
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#2
KBD
Selene said:
"EVGA has a strict no RMA policy when it comes to modded voltages/bios"

This is not true at all, I in the last year RMA'd a card that I changed the bios on, thats not what killed it, but it was not the BIOS that the card came with, and I could not change it back due to the card being dead.
I called EVGA told them what was going on, and bam 1 week later I had a new card, and shipping the out the old one.
Cost me $15.00 for ARMA and they paid shipping both ways.
thats nice of em to do that. though i agree with those that said that the use of this utility will prolly increase the number of cards submitted for RMA. evga will have to find some way to handle this and draw the line somewhere .
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#3
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
KBD said:
thats nice of em to do that. though i agree with those that said that the use of this utility will prolly increase the number of cards submitted for RMA. evga will have to find some way to handle this and draw the line somewhere .
Don't you pay for the RMA by buying the card in the first place, I mean I doubt it costs EVGA £200 to make one card.
Posted on Reply
#4
farlex85
DrPepper said:
Don't you pay for the RMA by buying the card in the first place, I mean I doubt it costs EVGA £200 to make one card.
Opportunity cost. That's a card they could've sold for 200.
Posted on Reply
#5
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
farlex85 said:
Opportunity cost. That's a card they could've sold for 200.
It is but there is a chance that person will buy more cards from EVGA later on so it kinda secures money in the future.
Posted on Reply
#6
pentastar111
KBD said:
thats nice of em to do that. though i agree with those that said that the use of this utility will prolly increase the number of cards submitted for RMA. evga will have to find some way to handle this and draw the line somewhere .
Although "within a range permissable by the GPU's BIOS" (paragraph 2, sentence 3)should cover the "inexperienced" OCer's mistakes so as to not allow too much of an overvolt, therefore keeping the RMA's to an acceptable level. I think the rma "troubles" will occur when enterprising individuals circumvent the parameters and actually volt beyond the utilities specs.
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#7
Solaris17
Creator Solaris Utility DVD
I dont think their will be alot of RMA's at all. think of it like this

1. their is a limit to ow much you can over volt.

2.they wouldnt allow an over volt that they knew could damage the card.

3. as such RMA'ing is probably not going to be a problem.

4. circumventing the parameters is meaningless. why?

5. because the regulators they use to up the voltage can probably only be pushed so far...probably not beyond the parameters they have already set in te program? why?

6.because it would be bad business because they know people will try. so what do they do?

7. lock the parameters. maybe.1v below what the physical vcontroller will actually do. meaning that even if you overrided the parameters youll only get .1v more. is this dangerous? no. i seriously doubt a company that knew enthusiasts would try to override it would put a regulator on it that had the ability to surpass a safe voltage level...in all probability volt modding is crippled like that. meaning that even if you circumvented the program you would be disappointed. youd need to break out the soldering iron anyway.
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#10
Hayder_Master
evga want to say we are the no1 nvdia brand, they are
Posted on Reply
#11
PP Mguire
eVGA will be #1 when they upgrade your card for free. Until then, no. They came out with a piece of program that can be re-written and re-branded for another companies use with a new skin. This will happen, making other companies just as good. I doubt seriously there is any "serious" volt mod going on because they know people like me and others will want to get the most out of the GPU. Meaning alot more fried cards so im sure there is an acceptable limit as was mentioned before.

Rule of thumb, you want something done good do it yourself. Learn to solder like the rest of us and volt mod that bad boy the real way =)
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#12
15th Warlock
I just hope they release the GTX 285 version soon, looking to upgrade mine with a Koolance waterblock in the near future :)
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