Thursday, July 23rd 2009

Intel Appeals Against EU Antitrust Verdict

Earlier this year in May, the European Commission for anti-competitive practices found Intel guilty of various antitrust practices. The company was then slapped with a massive 1.06 billion Euro (US $1.45 billion) fine, the single largest antitrust fine it has ever meted out to a company. On Wednesday, Intel explored its legal option of appealing against the fine with Court of First Instance in Luxembourg, Europe's second highest judicial body. The company argues that the EC regulator failed to consider the evidence that supported Intel's contention during the trial.

In a telephone interview with ComputerWorld, Robert Manetta, an Intel spokesperson said "We believe the Commission misinterpreted some evidence and ignored other pieces of evidence." Meanwhile, apart from the fine Intel is expected to pay within three months of the verdict, the ruling also puts a stop to Intel's rebates to PC manufacturers and retailers on condition of near or total exclusivity, among several other deemed malpractices. Authorities in South Korea and Japan found similar irregularities in Intel's marketing methods, while the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and New York Attorney General's office are investigating the company for abuse of its monopoly position.Source: ComputerWorld
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307 Comments on Intel Appeals Against EU Antitrust Verdict

#1
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I think the only way, legally, you can consider it an admission of guilt is Intel puts in a guilty plea. :laugh:
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#2
Meecrob
but you fail to see that anytime you settle out of court or take a plee that a large % of the population will assume your guilty, even if you did it just to get the damn case overwith and get on with your life/business.
Posted on Reply
#3
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
The lions share of the market has never even heard of the United States v. Microsoft case. Again, no one cares about antitrust cases unless it directly effects them.

A settlement is a means to an end. The longer a case continues, the more costly it becomes. A settlement puts the case to bed with neither side declared innocent or guilty--only agreeing to terms which end it.
Posted on Reply
#4
mdm-adph
FordGT90Concept said:
The public generally doesn't care about antitrust cases. Unless they can sign up and get some money from the lawsuit.
As I explained, I thought it was obvious that I wasn't talking about the public -- the public doesn't even know what a processor is. They usually think the "CPU" is "that big box that sits underneath my desk."
Posted on Reply
#5
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
The public I know is at least a little more intelligent than that (they call that the "tower," after all). :p
Posted on Reply
#6
Meecrob
Ford, I have delt with so many people who call it the Tower and then say its the CPU as well that its not even funny, they wont admit it, but most people see a computer as a magic box that "just works" and lets them look at porn or ebay or twitter or or or........

thats sad is when they brake their magic box, and want you to fix it, then get mad that your gonna charge them so much for fixing their magic box :P
Posted on Reply
#7
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I've dealt with lots of people. None have come across that computer illiterate. A lot of them probably don't know what exactly a CPU looks like but they are knowledgeable enough to know it is somewhere inside the tower.
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