• We've upgraded our forums. Please post any issues/requests in this thread.

A lot of us have lots of $ invested in our PC, risk of storms destroying it? Thoughts

Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
180 (0.06/day)
Likes
33
#26
I lost my very first compter (386/25, with 64k cache!) to a lightning strike, so yes. I had it hooked to a "surge protector" that was even switched off. The surge jumped the contacts I suspect.
Even when switched off, an appliance is still connected to AC mains and the surge. A protector too far from earth ground and too close to appliances gives a surge even more paths to find earth destructively via the appliance. In fact, an adjacent protector can bypass superior protection in a computer's power supply by connecting that surge directly to its motherboard.

Did you really think a 2 centimeter part inside a power strip will stop what three miles of sky could not? Most do only because hearsay and advertising says that.

Two completely different devices exist; both called protectors. One located adjacent to appliances does not even claim to protection from destructive surges. And costs tens or 100times more money.

The other is located adjacent to earth ground. Has numbers that define protection even from direct lightning strikes. And costs about $1 per protected appliance. This completely different device is the only solution found in any facility that cannot have damage. Separation between the protector and appliance increases protection. But more important is what makes any protector effective: that low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to earth ground.

Lightning will easily blow through an open switch or blown fuse. But it need not do so. Since an adjacent protector provides more wires to bypass superior protection inside the supply. Protector connects a surge directly to the motherboard.

Above says what one device, called a protector, does. And why it does not even claim to protect. Above also introduces another completely different device, also called a protector. That routinely protects from direct lightning strikes, is many times less expensive, is the only solution used where damage must not happen, and is properly sized so as to not fail.

Or read manufacturer spec numbers. How does that 'adjacent to the computer' protector absorb hundreds of thousands of joules when its own numbers only claim to absorb hundreds of joules? Either that 2 cm part must block the surge. Or must absorb it. In reality it does neither. It only does what its spec numbers claim: protect from surges that typically cause no damage.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
22,398 (5.82/day)
Likes
8,921
Location
'Merica. The Great SOUTH!
System Name The Mailbox 4.5
Processor Intel i7 2600k @ 4.2GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z77X-UP5 TH Intel LGA 1155
Cooling Scythe Katana 4
Memory G.SKILL Sniper Series 16GB DDR3 1866: 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) MSI 1080 "Duke" with 8Gb of RAM. Boost Clock 1847 MHz
Storage 256Gb M4 SSD, 500Gb WD (7200) 128Gb Agelity 4 SSD
Display(s) LG 29" Class 21:9 UltraWide® IPS LED Monitor 2560 x 1080
Case Cooler Master 922 HAF
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX X-Fi with Bose Companion 2 speakers.
Power Supply SeaSonic X Series X650 Gold
Mouse SteelSeries Sensei (RAW) and a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet.
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Benchmark Scores Benching is for bitches.
#27
Even when switched off, an appliance is still connected to AC mains and the surge. A protector too far from earth ground and too close to appliances gives a surge even more paths to find earth destructively via the appliance. In fact, an adjacent protector can bypass superior protection in a computer's power supply by connecting that surge directly to its motherboard.

Did you really think a 2 centimeter part inside a power strip will stop what three miles of sky could not? Most do only because hearsay and advertising says that.

Two completely different devices exist; both called protectors. One located adjacent to appliances does not even claim to protection from destructive surges. And costs tens or 100times more money.

The other is located adjacent to earth ground. Has numbers that define protection even from direct lightning strikes. And costs about $1 per protected appliance. This completely different device is the only solution found in any facility that cannot have damage. Separation between the protector and appliance increases protection. But more important is what makes any protector effective: that low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to earth ground.

Lightning will easily blow through an open switch or blown fuse. But it need not do so. Since an adjacent protector provides more wires to bypass superior protection inside the supply. Protector connects a surge directly to the motherboard.

Above says what one device, called a protector, does. And why it does not even claim to protect. Above also introduces another completely different device, also called a protector. That routinely protects from direct lightning strikes, is many times less expensive, is the only solution used where damage must not happen, and is properly sized so as to not fail.

Or read manufacturer spec numbers. How does that 'adjacent to the computer' protector absorb hundreds of thousands of joules when its own numbers only claim to absorb hundreds of joules? Either that 2 cm part must block the surge. Or must absorb it. In reality it does neither. It only does what its spec numbers claim: protect from surges that typically cause no damage.
Direct lighting strikes huh? :laugh: Here you go again.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2004
Messages
4,368 (0.92/day)
Likes
1,506
Location
Canuck in Norway
System Name Hellbox 3.0(same case new guts)
Processor i7 4790K
Motherboard Asus Z97 Sabertooth Mark 1
Cooling TT Kandalf L.C.S.(Water/Air)AC Cuplex Kryos CPU Block/Noctua
Memory 2x8GB Corsair Vengance Pro 2400
Video Card(s) Sapphire Tri-X Fury (Unlocked to Fury X)
Storage WD Caviar Black SATA 3 1TB x2 RAID 0 2xSamsung 850 Evo 500GB RAID 0
Display(s) ASUS MG279Q 1440 IPS 144Hz FreeSync
Case TT Kandalf L.C.S.
Audio Device(s) Soundblaster ZX/Logitech Z906 5.1
Power Supply Seasonic X-1050W 80+ Gold
Mouse G502 Proteus Spectrum
Keyboard G19s
Software Win 10 Pro x64
#28
Only thing I can think of that I lost due to a storm was the AC Adapter for my Router. My whole system is plugged into a "half decent" Belkin unit, PC was off but didn't think about the router. "Surge Master" my arse didn't even trip just fried that adapter...
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#29
When you buy stuff, be sure to get warranty on it.

There is nothing that can 100% protect your PC. In fact, your GF spilling coffee on your gaming rig (or you spilling your beverage) or a pipe leak, or a fire, or some other random physical act is just as likely (if not more) than a surge to take out your gear.

Bottom line - look at your computer exactly as you said - $ invested. If it is a large enough sum, insure it.
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2008
Messages
922 (0.28/day)
Likes
281
Location
Akron, OH
System Name Main Rig
Processor Athlon 5350
Motherboard AsRock mITX
Memory 4gb
Storage 120gb Kingston HyperX SSD
Display(s) Samsung Syncmaster 740N
Power Supply Corsair 430 watt
#30
A well-made and well-designed surge protector is capable of stopping a lightning strike. That doesn't mean it is capable of stopping every lightning strike. Even the best surge protectors, however, cannot stop it completely. Lightning is a tricky beast. It can leap to electronics in a lot of different ways. Even if your device is completely unplugged from the wall, the EMP effect of a direct lightning strike can still destroy sensitive electronics if the strike is close enough. Getting a good surge protector, and making sure that all of your connections (network, cable, etc.) are run through it offers you some protection, but not complete protection. You'll need to make sure your devices are insured if you want complete protection.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#31
A well-made and well-designed surge protector is capable of stopping a lightning strike. That doesn't mean it is capable of stopping every lightning strike. Even the best surge protectors, however, cannot stop it completely. Lightning is a tricky beast. It can leap to electronics in a lot of different ways. Even if your device is completely unplugged from the wall, the EMP effect of a direct lightning strike can still destroy sensitive electronics if the strike is close enough. Getting a good surge protector, and making sure that all of your connections (network, cable, etc.) are run through it offers you some protection, but not complete protection. You'll need to make sure your devices are insured if you want complete protection.
I mean unless you live in a very high, dry, elevation with lots of lightning the odds of this are pretty low. If that is the case get a proper APC/power filtering unit and be sure to use plastic rizers/ insulating case components?

I think if you are that worried about lightning hitting your rig, you should get a bit more than a surge protector.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
180 (0.06/day)
Likes
33
#32
My whole system is plugged into a "half decent" Belkin unit, PC was off but didn't think about the router. "Surge Master" my arse didn't even trip just fried that adapter...
Did you read those Belkin specs? It does not even claim to protect from destructive surges. Its numbers define protection only from surges that typically do no damage.

Despite popular hearsay, one effective protector must protect everything in the house even from a direct lightning strike. Its spec numbers will say so. For example, lightning is maybe 20,000 amps. So a 'whole house' protector is rated at least 50,000 amps - so that even the protector is not damaged. Facilities that cannot have damage always earth a 'whole house' protector. They need protection; not a scam.

For protection, buy something completely different that, unfortunately, has the same name. More responsible companies provide these 'whole house' protectors. Including General Electic, Intermatic, Ditek, Siemens, Leviton, ABB, Square D, and so many other companies known by any guy for their integrity. Critical is to earth a surge BEFORE it can enter the building. Only effective protectors also have a dedictated earthing wire. Any protector adjacent to electronics can sometimes make damage easier. Best protectors also increase separation between protector and electronics.

An effective protector connects low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Not to motherboard digital ground, chassis ground, wall recpetacle safety ground, or TV floating ground. That 'as short as possible' connection must be to what actually absorbs all surge energy - earth ground.

It's easy to sell magic boxes to the naive. The naive do not ask damning questions. For example, a protector adjacent to that router must either block a surge or absorb it. How does that 2 cm part block what three miles of sky could not? It cannot. How does its hundreds of joules absorb a surge that is hundreds of thousands of joules? It doesn't.

It does not have to. Notice how many just know it protects from lightning even if the manufaturer specifications do not even claim that protection. Honest replies include underlying facts and numbers. The Belkin did near zero protection that its own spec numbers said it would do. In some facilities, an employee could be fired for installing that Belkin. They cannot have damage.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
22,398 (5.82/day)
Likes
8,921
Location
'Merica. The Great SOUTH!
System Name The Mailbox 4.5
Processor Intel i7 2600k @ 4.2GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z77X-UP5 TH Intel LGA 1155
Cooling Scythe Katana 4
Memory G.SKILL Sniper Series 16GB DDR3 1866: 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) MSI 1080 "Duke" with 8Gb of RAM. Boost Clock 1847 MHz
Storage 256Gb M4 SSD, 500Gb WD (7200) 128Gb Agelity 4 SSD
Display(s) LG 29" Class 21:9 UltraWide® IPS LED Monitor 2560 x 1080
Case Cooler Master 922 HAF
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX X-Fi with Bose Companion 2 speakers.
Power Supply SeaSonic X Series X650 Gold
Mouse SteelSeries Sensei (RAW) and a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet.
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Benchmark Scores Benching is for bitches.
#33
Did you read those Belkin specs? It does not even claim to protect from destructive surges. Its numbers define protection only from surges that typically do no damage.

Despite popular hearsay, one effective protector must protect everything in the house even from a direct lightning strike. Its spec numbers will say so. For example, lightning is maybe 20,000 amps. So a 'whole house' protector is rated at least 50,000 amps - so that even the protector is not damaged. Facilities that cannot have damage always earth a 'whole house' protector. They need protection; not a scam.

For protection, buy something completely different that, unfortunately, has the same name. More responsible companies provide these 'whole house' protectors. Including General Electic, Intermatic, Ditek, Siemens, Leviton, ABB, Square D, and so many other companies known by any guy for their integrity. Critical is to earth a surge BEFORE it can enter the building. Only effective protectors also have a dedictated earthing wire. Any protector adjacent to electronics can sometimes make damage easier. Best protectors also increase separation between protector and electronics.

An effective protector connects low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Not to motherboard digital ground, chassis ground, wall recpetacle safety ground, or TV floating ground. That 'as short as possible' connection must be to what actually absorbs all surge energy - earth ground.

It's easy to sell magic boxes to the naive. The naive do not ask damning questions. For example, a protector adjacent to that router must either block a surge or absorb it. How does that 2 cm part block what three miles of sky could not? It cannot. How does its hundreds of joules absorb a surge that is hundreds of thousands of joules? It doesn't.

It does not have to. Notice how many just know it protects from lightning even if the manufaturer specifications do not even claim that protection. Honest replies include underlying facts and numbers. The Belkin did near zero protection that its own spec numbers said it would do. In some facilities, an employee could be fired for installing that Belkin. They cannot have damage.
http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2659006&postcount=17
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,786 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,776
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#34
Did you really think a 2 centimeter part inside a power strip will stop what three miles of sky could not? Most do only because hearsay and advertising says that.
It take roughly 30,000 volts to jump a 1 inch gap

A typical lightning bolt contains 1 billion volts, you do the math.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2007
Messages
6,139 (1.67/day)
Likes
1,634
Location
Austin Texas
System Name silen8
Processor Intel i7 7820X Delidded @ 4.64Ghz / 3.1Ghz Mesh
Motherboard MSI X299 Tomahawk
Cooling 240mm Corsair H105 Intake
Memory 32 GB Quad 3434Mhz DDR4 15-16-16-38-300-1T
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080 Ti Gaming
Storage 1Tb Samsung 960 Pro m2, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD
Display(s) Dell 24" 2560x1440 144hz, G-Sync @ 165Hz
Case NZXT S340 Elite Black
Audio Device(s) Arctis 7
Power Supply FSP HydroG 750W
Mouse zowie ec-2
Keyboard corsair k65 tenkeyless
Software Windows 10 64 Bit
Benchmark Scores Cb: 2103 Multi, 209 Single, 10450 Timespy - 10150 GPU/11900 CPU, superpi 1M - 7.71s
#35
It take roughly 30,000 volts to jump a 1 inch gap

A typical lightning bolt contains 1 billion volts, you do the math.
LOL :toast:
 
Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
180 (0.06/day)
Likes
33
#36
It take roughly 30,000 volts to jump a 1 inch gap
A typical lightning bolt contains 1 billion volts, you do the math.
If 30,000 volts can jump 2.5 centimeters, then how does that 2 cm protector part in a magic box stop 1 billion volts? Magic power strips will stop it? Even its specs do not claim protection from a typically destructive surge.

Telcos all over the world suffer about 100 surges with each storm. How many times has your town been without phone service for 4 days while they replace that $multi-million computer? Never? How can that be if nothing can stop 1 billion volts?

Simple. Informed consumers and telcos do not buy expensive protectors that claim miracles. Do not buy protectors located adjacent to electronics. Do not buy protectors defined by the NIST as "useless".

A surge connected low impedance (ie 'less than 3 meters') to earth ground is not inside the building. Routine is to absorb surges harmlessly in earth. Then everyone in town uses telephone without interruption during and after every thunderstorm. Superior solution costs about $1 per protected appliance.

Do the math. Number of days your town has no phone service after each thunderstorm? Zero. Protection, as used even 100 years ago, is that effective. And is not found or provided in 'many times more expensive' magic boxes. It did what it manufacturer specs said it would do. Did not even protect a router's supply.

Protection from all lightning is always about a current path into earth. If that path is inside via appliances, then damage is inevitable. If outside, then hundreds of thousands of joules (and that rumored billion volts) dissipate harmlessly in earth. Nobody even knew a surge existed. As Franklin first demonstrated in 1752.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
22,398 (5.82/day)
Likes
8,921
Location
'Merica. The Great SOUTH!
System Name The Mailbox 4.5
Processor Intel i7 2600k @ 4.2GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z77X-UP5 TH Intel LGA 1155
Cooling Scythe Katana 4
Memory G.SKILL Sniper Series 16GB DDR3 1866: 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) MSI 1080 "Duke" with 8Gb of RAM. Boost Clock 1847 MHz
Storage 256Gb M4 SSD, 500Gb WD (7200) 128Gb Agelity 4 SSD
Display(s) LG 29" Class 21:9 UltraWide® IPS LED Monitor 2560 x 1080
Case Cooler Master 922 HAF
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX X-Fi with Bose Companion 2 speakers.
Power Supply SeaSonic X Series X650 Gold
Mouse SteelSeries Sensei (RAW) and a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet.
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Benchmark Scores Benching is for bitches.
#37
If 30,000 volts can jump 2.5 centimeters, then how does that 2 cm protector part in a magic box stop 1 billion volts? Magic power strips will stop it? Even its specs do not claim protection from a typically destructive surge.

Telcos all over the world suffer about 100 surges with each storm. How many times has your town been without phone service for 4 days while they replace that $multi-million computer? Never? How can that be if nothing can stop 1 billion volts?

Simple. Informed consumers and telcos do not buy expensive protectors that claim miracles. Do not buy protectors located adjacent to electronics. Do not buy protectors defined by the NIST as "useless".

A surge connected low impedance (ie 'less than 3 meters') to earth ground is not inside the building. Routine is to absorb surges harmlessly in earth. Then everyone in town uses telephone without interruption during and after every thunderstorm. Superior solution costs about $1 per protected appliance.

Do the math. Number of days your town has no phone service after each thunderstorm? Zero. Protection, as used even 100 years ago, is that effective. And is not found or provided in 'many times more expensive' magic boxes. It did what it manufacturer specs said it would do. Did not even protect a router's supply.

Protection from all lightning is always about a current path into earth. If that path is inside via appliances, then damage is inevitable. If outside, then hundreds of thousands of joules (and that rumored billion volts) dissipate harmlessly in earth. Nobody even knew a surge existed. As Franklin first demonstrated in 1752.
Here we go comparing telcos with normal residential houses again. Next up the Ufer ground system. When you gonna stop spreading unpractical FUD man.
 
Joined
Jun 29, 2007
Messages
1,126 (0.29/day)
Likes
651
Location
Repentigny, QC, CANADA
System Name CTG Computer
Processor Intel i7 4770k @ 4.3ghz 1.264v
Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Formula
Cooling Noctua NH-U12S
Memory 2x 8gb Mushkin Blackline 2133mhz@2400mhz 11-13-13-31-1T 1.65v
Video Card(s) Gigabyte RX580 Gaming 4GB
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256gb (OS) | Crucial MX100 256gb (games) | Silicon Power S55 240gb (Games)
Display(s) Asus vg248qe
Case Fractal Design Define S
Audio Device(s) Creative SoundBlaster Z PCI-E
Power Supply eVGA SuperNova 750w G2
Mouse CM Mizar
Keyboard Logitech G110
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#38
I don't have any such protection and never experienced any problems. Germany's power network is great though, there's a short outage maybe once every two years.

Does anyone actually know anybody who had damage from lightning?
All powerbar, UPS I have have the 3 pins like this:



All what is important have this. Never had any issue. The only thing I saw that broke, was a VHS at my parent'S home, long time ago. Hydro-Quebec did pay for the broken stuff.



this was the problem. As for lightning, I guess before a lightning just hit your cable and not the transfo, it will broke your house and put it in fire lol.. There is alot of people having their house damage from lightning. I would care much more about my house and life, then my computer..
 
Joined
Jan 15, 2012
Messages
945 (0.44/day)
Likes
493
Location
Arcadia
System Name Xeon build /Main Rig
Processor Intel Xeon w3520 @ 4Ghz with HT /i7 4820k @4.6 Ghz
Motherboard Asus P6T Deluxe v2 socket 1366 / Asus P9X79 socket 2011
Cooling Thermalright Archon +Ty 140mm|Fans : 2 front-1top-1rear-1bottom/ Swiftech H140x
Memory 16gb DDR3 1600mhz Kingstone Hyper x Quad Channel / 16gb DDR3 2133MHZ Gskill RipjawsZ
Video Card(s) Sapphire hd 7950 3gb Boost edition dual fan X / XFX R9 Fury X
Storage Kingstone AV400ssd 120gb + Seagate B 2Tb + WD green 1tb + WD green 3tb + WD red 3tb + Seagate B 4tb
Display(s) Wasabi Mango UHD430 43" 4K @60hz with Freesync
Case Fractal Design Arc midi
Audio Device(s) SoundMaxHD+5.1 BHT1100 BLUESKY,Corsair Vengeance 1500 v2,Fiio E10 Olympus+SuperluxHD668b
Power Supply Thermaltake toughpower xt 775watt modular
Mouse Corsair M90
Keyboard Microsoft WK600
Software Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
#39
that's correct. we have three wires in the cable. one phase, one ground and one additional ground which is connected to the outer metal of the device. if the phase gets lose for some reason and touches the metal shell you'd get a nasty shock normally, but with that system it will just kick out the circuit breaker and people don't die.

for the discussion in this thread this makes no difference though
same in italy, the only problem is then italy and other country in europe bring energy from france ,and is a shit paying the company for energy than they dont make it xd
 
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
2,516 (0.91/day)
Likes
680
Location
Canada
System Name m1dg3t | DeathBox | HairPi 3
Processor 3570k @ 4.0 1.15v BIOS | q9550 @ 3.77 1.325v BIOS
Motherboard Asrock z77e iTX | p5q Dlx 2301 BIOS
Cooling Custom Water | D-14 & HR-03gt | Passive HSF
Memory Samsung MV-3V4G3D 4g x 2 @ 1866 1.35v | OcZ RpR 2g x 4 @ 1067 2.2v
Video Card(s) MSi 7950 tf3 @1000 / 1350 | Asus 5870 V2 @ 900 / 1275
Storage Adata sx900 256Gb / WD 2500 HHTZ | WD 1001 FALS x 2
Display(s) BenQ gw2750hm | 46" Sharp Quatron
Case BitFenix Prodigy - m0dd3d | Antec Fusion Remote MAX
Audio Device(s) Onboard Toslink > Yamaha HTR 6290 | Xonar HDAV1.3 > Yamaha DSP z7
Power Supply Ocz mXp700w | Ocz zx850w | Cannakit 5v 2.5a
Mouse Logitech G700s | Logitech G9x - Cable Repaired
Keyboard TT Meka G1 - Black w Cherry Blacks| Logitech G11
Software Win7 Home | Xp sp3 & Vista ultimate | Raspbian
Benchmark Scores Epeen!! Who needs epeen??
#40
My "main" rig is plugged into a Monster combo avs2000/hts5100 mk2, but thats only because it is in the rack beside the TV. My other box is plugged into an earthed $15 supressor with a $125k replacement coverage "guarantee" :rolleyes:

Haven't decided what to do with my next build yet, still waiting on some parts so no rush :roll:

Edit: I'm more concerned with the 12g/10g ALU wire running throughout this apt building than being kicked by a lightning strike
 
Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
180 (0.06/day)
Likes
33
#41
There is alot of people having their house damage from lightning. I would care much more about my house and life, then my computer..
Worry about a power bar that claims hundreds of joules. A surge - hundreds of thousands of joules - can easily overwhelm that protector. It has two choices. Disconnect protector parts as fast as possible while leaving the computer connected to that surge. Or not disconnect fast enough and create a house fire.

Grossly undersized protectors disconnect fast enough - most of the time. But many, such as ramjet33 on 6 Jun 2012, discovered the resulting house fire that almost killed his entire family. In "My 110 Tall had a fire over the weekend!":
After placing a 911 call and getting the kids situated, I found the fire behind the tank in the dining room. A quick hit with the extinguisher killed the flames but the damage has been done. All my powerheads, skimmer, and MH light is dead. All the chemicals under the stand melted. and my test kits were scorched. The fire investigator says a build up of moisture in the surge protector faild the circuit and superheated to combustible limits. ...
And the UL listed SP was still able to hold a charge enough to super heat the plastic to get flaming.
Just another reason why informed consumers earth one 'whole house' protector. So that power strip protectors are protected - do not cause house fires.

melbourne architect in "Safety Switches / Surge Protection" at describes another protector created fire:
Cheap surge protectors have been known to catch fire (in one case, a Fire Station was burnt out; the red faced fireman later learnt it was due to the cheap surge protector/power strip in the office)
Even firemen sometimes have to learn this stuff the hard way. rather than read spec numbers. Protection means that current is not inside a building.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,786 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,776
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#42
To be completely safe...



For the unitiated, that is a Faraday cage
 
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
9,767 (2.99/day)
Likes
1,779
Location
Suffolk/Essex, England
System Name Joseph's Laptop Clevo P771ZM
Processor 4970k @4/4.4ghz
Motherboard *shrugs*
Cooling About 2 kilos of copper fins and pipes.
Memory 2x 8gb
Video Card(s) GTX 970m 6gb
Storage 500gb Msata SSD 2x 2TB storage drives
Display(s) Built in
Power Supply 300w power brick
Mouse Steam controller
Software Windows ten
#43
How many lightning rods do you get on buildings in the US?

Anything over three stories high tends to get lead strips bolted to the top and side of the buildings here.


Also in an "emergency" you can use them to climb up the buildings XD

( I noticed that buildings in Italy, Torino anyway have the same strips)
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 29, 2007
Messages
1,126 (0.29/day)
Likes
651
Location
Repentigny, QC, CANADA
System Name CTG Computer
Processor Intel i7 4770k @ 4.3ghz 1.264v
Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Formula
Cooling Noctua NH-U12S
Memory 2x 8gb Mushkin Blackline 2133mhz@2400mhz 11-13-13-31-1T 1.65v
Video Card(s) Gigabyte RX580 Gaming 4GB
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256gb (OS) | Crucial MX100 256gb (games) | Silicon Power S55 240gb (Games)
Display(s) Asus vg248qe
Case Fractal Design Define S
Audio Device(s) Creative SoundBlaster Z PCI-E
Power Supply eVGA SuperNova 750w G2
Mouse CM Mizar
Keyboard Logitech G110
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#44
Worry about a power bar that claims hundreds of joules. A surge - hundreds of thousands of joules - can easily overwhelm that protector. It has two choices. Disconnect protector parts as fast as possible while leaving the computer connected to that surge. Or not disconnect fast enough and create a house fire.

Grossly undersized protectors disconnect fast enough - most of the time. But many, such as ramjet33 on 6 Jun 2012, discovered the resulting house fire that almost killed his entire family. In "My 110 Tall had a fire over the weekend!":

Just another reason why informed consumers earth one 'whole house' protector. So that power strip protectors are protected - do not cause house fires.

melbourne architect in "Safety Switches / Surge Protection" at describes another protector created fire: Even firemen sometimes have to learn this stuff the hard way. rather than read spec numbers. Protection means that current is not inside a building.
We can't be 100% protected ;) a TV open could make a fire, your electrical system while lseeping could start burning, without having a lightning strike..

So, basically, we should not buy anything that have electricity, or fire... We are sure to have only lightning strike to burn our house? ...
 
Joined
Dec 5, 2009
Messages
180 (0.06/day)
Likes
33
#45
We can't be 100% protected
Nobody said anything about 100% protection. But the IEEE says proper earthing provides "99.5% to 99.9% protection". Protection by earthing only one 'whole house' protector means a current need not hunt for earth inside; destructively via appliances. The IEEE then says, "Still, a 99.5% protection level will reduce the incidence of direct strokes from one stroke per 30 years ... to one stroke per 6000 years ... ".

Are those numbers good enough?
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
9,786 (2.23/day)
Likes
3,776
Location
Manchester, NH
System Name Working on it ;)
Processor I7-4790K
Motherboard MSI Z97
Cooling Be Quiet Pure Rock Air
Memory 16GB 4x4 G.Skill CAS9 2133 Sniper
Video Card(s) Intel IGP (Dedicated GPU TBD)
Storage WD 320 / 500KS / 500KS / 640KS / 640LS / 640LS / 640LS / 1TBFAEX and a NAS with 2x2Tb WD Black
Display(s) 24" DELL 2405FPW
Case Rosewill Challenger
Audio Device(s) Onboard + HD HDMI
Power Supply Corsair HX750 (love it)
Mouse Logitech G5
Software Win 7 Pro
#46
How many lightning rods do you get on buildings in the US?

Anything over three stories high tends to get lead strips bolted to the top and side of the buildings here.
It depends on the area. From what I've witnessed, if a building is struck and damaged by lightning, the owners will usually end up installing one, after the fact.

National Electric Code:

The National Electrical Code is NFPA Document #70, as the Lightning Protection Standard is NFPA #780. These are separate documents available for adoption by the "local authority having jurisdiction" for construction projects in their locale. In many locations NFPA 70 (NEC) is adopted, but #780 is not - it is an option. The NEC does not require lightning protection, although it does reference 780 in several sections. Coordination generally exists between the Committees charged with keeping the documents updated. NEC references the fact that an electric service shall have a ground and lightning protection systems shall have separate grounds. NEC references the fact that when there is a 780 lightning protection system the grounds shall be interconnected with the electrical ground. NEC addresses surge suppression as an option, but wording is to be added to clarify that when a 780 lightning protection system is installed, the surge is required by that Standard. Items such as ground terminal devices are coordinated between documents, so that the same products are used in similar soil types. We would presume that since lightning risk assessment is determined through Annex L of the #780 document, and there are locations without much lightning activity, it would be difficult to require lightning protection everywhere or even on specific structures everywhere in a document like NEC. This would make the NEC document not as useful in certain areas.
I'm sure city codes are more stringent.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
22,398 (5.82/day)
Likes
8,921
Location
'Merica. The Great SOUTH!
System Name The Mailbox 4.5
Processor Intel i7 2600k @ 4.2GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z77X-UP5 TH Intel LGA 1155
Cooling Scythe Katana 4
Memory G.SKILL Sniper Series 16GB DDR3 1866: 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) MSI 1080 "Duke" with 8Gb of RAM. Boost Clock 1847 MHz
Storage 256Gb M4 SSD, 500Gb WD (7200) 128Gb Agelity 4 SSD
Display(s) LG 29" Class 21:9 UltraWide® IPS LED Monitor 2560 x 1080
Case Cooler Master 922 HAF
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX X-Fi with Bose Companion 2 speakers.
Power Supply SeaSonic X Series X650 Gold
Mouse SteelSeries Sensei (RAW) and a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet.
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Benchmark Scores Benching is for bitches.
#47
Nobody said anything about 100% protection. But the IEEE says proper earthing provides "99.5% to 99.9% protection". Protection by earthing only one 'whole house' protector means a current need not hunt for earth inside; destructively via appliances. The IEEE then says, "Still, a 99.5% protection level will reduce the incidence of direct strokes from one stroke per 30 years ... to one stroke per 6000 years ... ".

Are those numbers good enough?
The NIST and IEEE also say surge protectors are effective. So what is it westom? Also if you think a whole house protector can stop a direct hit I got a bridge to sell ya.

It depends on the area. From what I've witnessed, if a building is struck and damaged by lightning, the owners will usually end up installing one, after the fact.

National Electric Code:



I'm sure city codes are more stringent.
In FL it goes by county. Miami-Dade has some of the more strict codes in the US.
 
Joined
Jun 29, 2007
Messages
1,126 (0.29/day)
Likes
651
Location
Repentigny, QC, CANADA
System Name CTG Computer
Processor Intel i7 4770k @ 4.3ghz 1.264v
Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Formula
Cooling Noctua NH-U12S
Memory 2x 8gb Mushkin Blackline 2133mhz@2400mhz 11-13-13-31-1T 1.65v
Video Card(s) Gigabyte RX580 Gaming 4GB
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256gb (OS) | Crucial MX100 256gb (games) | Silicon Power S55 240gb (Games)
Display(s) Asus vg248qe
Case Fractal Design Define S
Audio Device(s) Creative SoundBlaster Z PCI-E
Power Supply eVGA SuperNova 750w G2
Mouse CM Mizar
Keyboard Logitech G110
Software Windows 10 Pro x64
#48
http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/IEEE_Guide.pdf

This guide is intended to provide useful information about the proper specification
and application of surge protectors, to protect houses and their contents from
lightning and other electrical surges.
Telephone line “primary protectors” have been required for almost 100 years, and
are normally spark gap protectors, based on either carbon or gas discharge tubes.
“Carbon block” protectors consist of carbon electrodes and an air gap.
one question I would like to ask, if proper earthing provides 99.5% to 99.9% protection, why not Grounding all what exist? So there would be no lightning strike?
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2005
Messages
2,908 (0.65/day)
Likes
656
Location
Baltimore MD
Processor FX-8320@ 4.2Ghz
Motherboard Gigabyte 970A-UD3
Cooling Xigmatek S1283
Memory 2x4Gb Corsair 1600 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) Sapphire RX-480 Nitro
Storage OCZ Vertex 3 120G, 1TB WD Black
Display(s) Dell S2330MX
Case Corsair Carbide Air 540
Audio Device(s) X-Fi Fatal1ty / 5.1 Logitech Z-5500
Power Supply Silverstone DA750
Software Win10 pro 64bit
#49
My thoughts, a surge protector is like a seat belt it will save your ass most of the time but when you drive off the road and hit a tree at 100mph not much is going to save you.

Same apply's to lightning, most strikes and surges are going to occur away from your house which the surge protector will stop most of the time, lightning hits the ground 5ft from your house all bets are off.

When we get storms with lots of lightning and wind here i flip the breaker that all my equipment is hooked to and disconnect the cable line where it comes in the house.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
22,398 (5.82/day)
Likes
8,921
Location
'Merica. The Great SOUTH!
System Name The Mailbox 4.5
Processor Intel i7 2600k @ 4.2GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z77X-UP5 TH Intel LGA 1155
Cooling Scythe Katana 4
Memory G.SKILL Sniper Series 16GB DDR3 1866: 9-9-9-24
Video Card(s) MSI 1080 "Duke" with 8Gb of RAM. Boost Clock 1847 MHz
Storage 256Gb M4 SSD, 500Gb WD (7200) 128Gb Agelity 4 SSD
Display(s) LG 29" Class 21:9 UltraWide® IPS LED Monitor 2560 x 1080
Case Cooler Master 922 HAF
Audio Device(s) SupremeFX X-Fi with Bose Companion 2 speakers.
Power Supply SeaSonic X Series X650 Gold
Mouse SteelSeries Sensei (RAW) and a Wacom Intuos 4 tablet.
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow
Software Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
Benchmark Scores Benching is for bitches.
#50
My thoughts, a surge protector is like a seat belt it will save your ass most of the time but when you drive off the road and hit a tree at 100mph not much is going to save you.

Same apply's to lightning, most strikes and surges are going to occur away from your house which the surge protector will stop most of the time, lightning hits the ground 5ft from your house all bets are off.

When we get storms with lots of lightning and wind here i flip the breaker that all my equipment is hooked to and disconnect the cable line where it comes in the house.
I can show you photo evidence of this. Hold on let me find the link.

Edit:
http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php/111891-Inspecting-for-lightning-damage?