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Acer Nitro 5 AN515-53 - Does undervolting CPU affect turbo boost?

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These are my settings, if I wanted to use turbo boost with these undervolts would that affect the performance of it?
 

unclewebb

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I wanted to use turbo boost with these undervolts would that affect the performance of it?
Using turbo boost significantly improves performance. I have no idea whey you selected Disable Turbo or why you set the turbo ratio limits so low. Your settings are killing the performance of your laptop.

Your undervolt settings look appropriate for an 8300H. Fix your settings so your CPU can run at its Intel rated speed. No need to baby an Intel CPU. It is rated to run reliably up to 100°C. That is why Intel sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100°C. Below 100°C is safe. Above 100°C is not safe and should be avoided.

There is no need to check the Speed Shift EPP option in ThrottleStop. Windows 10 is able to manage this setting. Clear this box in ThrottleStop. Use the Windows power slider in the system tray. This allows Windows to be in full control of Speed Shift EPP. It is not a good idea to have ThrottleStop writing one EPP value to the CPU while Windows is busy writing a different value to the same CPU register.

Update to ThrottleStop 9.4. You can copy the new ThrottleStop.exe into your current ThrottleStop folder.

Your voltage settings should be stable whether you are using turbo boost or not. The only way to find out for sure is to do some testing.
 
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Using turbo boost significantly improves performance. I have no idea whey you selected Disable Turbo or why you set the turbo ratio limits so low. Your settings are killing the performance of your laptop.

Your undervolt settings look appropriate for an 8300H. Fix your settings so your CPU can run at its Intel rated speed. No need to baby an Intel CPU. It is rated to run reliably up to 100°C. That is why Intel sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100°C. Below 100°C is safe. Above 100°C is not safe and should be avoided.

There is no need to check the Speed Shift EPP option in ThrottleStop. Windows 10 is able to manage this setting. Clear this box in ThrottleStop. Use the Windows power slider in the system tray. This allows Windows to be in full control of Speed Shift EPP. It is not a good idea to have ThrottleStop writing one EPP value to the CPU while Windows is busy writing a different value to the same CPU register.

Update to ThrottleStop 9.4. You can copy the new ThrottleStop.exe into your current ThrottleStop folder.

Your voltage settings should be stable whether you are using turbo boost or not. The only way to find out for sure is to do some testing.
I am using a laptop, I am more concerned about temperatures and therefore disable turbo boost when not playing games and enable it when playing certain more demanding games but I limit the Ghz depending on what I play to not increase temperatures dramatically.

Yes, it is safe to run below 100 degrees but constantly running 90 will decrease the lifespan of the CPU overtime and I am trying to use this laptop for a long time.

I have found EPP to be helpful and haven't experienced any issues with it, I used this article in the past to look up the info and its generally recommended: The ThrottleStop Guide (2021): How to Lower Temperatures, Increase Performance and Boost Battery Life (ultrabookreview.com)

I set my power slider to best performance when plugged in, I don't know if this really does cause conflict with the power slider, but I haven't experienced any performance issues so it should be fine.

I've updated to 9.4 now.
 

unclewebb

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The monitoring table in the top right corner of the ThrottleStop FIVR window shows what EPP value the CPU is using. In the screenshots you posted above, the main ThrottleStop screen shows that you have ThrottleStop requesting an EPP value of 128. The FIVR window shows that the CPU is actually using an EPP value of 178. That means Windows is in control of the EPP value.

ThrottleStop is constantly writing 128 to the EPP register but Windows is writing 178 to the same register. Windows must be writing values to the EPP register more frequently than ThrottleStop does. Windows is winning the tug of war over the EPP value. That means you do not need to check the Speed Shift EPP value in ThrottleStop. Windows is controlling this. You only need to check the ThrottleStop EPP option if you have an older CPU or if you are using an older version of Windows that is not Speed Shift aware.

Clear the Speed Shift EPP box in ThrottleStop and switch power plans and move the Windows power slider back and forth and watch the Speed Shift EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. You should see Windows changing the EPP value as you make changes to the Windows power settings.

running 90 will decrease the lifespan of the CPU
Poorly cooled servers with Intel CPUs run these sort of temperatures 24/7 for years without any issues. I have never seen an Intel CPU die from heat exhaustion. That is why Intel confidently sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100°C. Intel has been building Core i CPUs for 13 years. If high temperatures were a problem and costing Intel $$$$$ in warranty returns, they would have lowered this temperature a long time ago. No need to worry about your CPU temperature. Intel CPUs are well engineered to look after themselves.
 
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The monitoring table in the top right corner of the ThrottleStop FIVR window shows what EPP value the CPU is using. In the screenshots you posted above, the main ThrottleStop screen shows that you have ThrottleStop requesting an EPP value of 128. The FIVR window shows that the CPU is actually using an EPP value of 178. That means Windows is in control of the EPP value.

ThrottleStop is constantly writing 128 to the EPP register but Windows is writing 178 to the same register. Windows must be writing values to the EPP register more frequently than ThrottleStop does. Windows is winning the tug of war over the EPP value. That means you do not need to check the Speed Shift EPP value in ThrottleStop. Windows is controlling this. You only need to check the ThrottleStop EPP option if you have an older CPU or if you are using an older version of Windows that is not Speed Shift aware.

Clear the Speed Shift EPP box in ThrottleStop and switch power plans and move the Windows power slider back and forth and watch the Speed Shift EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. You should see Windows changing the EPP value as you make changes to the Windows power settings.


Poorly cooled servers with Intel CPUs run these sort of temperatures 24/7 for years without any issues. I have never seen an Intel CPU die from heat exhaustion. That is why Intel confidently sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100°C. Intel has been building Core i CPUs for 13 years. If high temperatures were a problem and costing Intel $$$$$ in warranty returns, they would have lowered this temperature a long time ago. No need to worry about your CPU temperature. Intel CPUs are well engineered to look after themselves.
Sounds good, but I will try to keep temperatures down regardless to prevent throttling and prevent any issues that may arise because of constant high fan speeds and high temperatures. Thank you.

It seems windows best performance can only go up to 84, when I switch speedshift to 32 it seems to win the tug of war half of the time. In this case due to windows taking control, is there no other way to increase the EPP?

Edit: It seems when plugged in throttlestop takes control, not windows. When I put EPP to 32 and turned off speedshift when plugged in, it still remains at 32.

Edit 2: When the laptop is not plugged in and EPP is enabled, FIVR will show window's EPP of 84 initially, but will turn back to my set value after a second. It does this every time I check FIVR. You still think I should disable it?

The monitoring table in the top right corner of the ThrottleStop FIVR window shows what EPP value the CPU is using. In the screenshots you posted above, the main ThrottleStop screen shows that you have ThrottleStop requesting an EPP value of 128. The FIVR window shows that the CPU is actually using an EPP value of 178. That means Windows is in control of the EPP value.

ThrottleStop is constantly writing 128 to the EPP register but Windows is writing 178 to the same register. Windows must be writing values to the EPP register more frequently than ThrottleStop does. Windows is winning the tug of war over the EPP value. That means you do not need to check the Speed Shift EPP value in ThrottleStop. Windows is controlling this. You only need to check the ThrottleStop EPP option if you have an older CPU or if you are using an older version of Windows that is not Speed Shift aware.

Clear the Speed Shift EPP box in ThrottleStop and switch power plans and move the Windows power slider back and forth and watch the Speed Shift EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. You should see Windows changing the EPP value as you make changes to the Windows power settings.


Poorly cooled servers with Intel CPUs run these sort of temperatures 24/7 for years without any issues. I have never seen an Intel CPU die from heat exhaustion. That is why Intel confidently sets the thermal throttling temperature to 100°C. Intel has been building Core i CPUs for 13 years. If high temperatures were a problem and costing Intel $$$$$ in warranty returns, they would have lowered this temperature a long time ago. No need to worry about your CPU temperature. Intel CPUs are well engineered to look after themselves.
It seems it's best for me to turn EPP on, when plugged in on best performance when speedshift is off, EPP is constantly 0 which is what I don't want. Even if I change the slider it doesn't change, as long as it's plugged in speedshift is not a problem for my system.
 
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unclewebb

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is there no other way to increase the EPP?
I think you can edit the hidden Speed Shift settings in the Windows power plan. You might be able to do that to get Windows to write 32 to the EPP register instead of 84. If you do not do that, you will always end up with ThrottleStop and Windows writing different EPP values to the same register.

Is there any big difference in performance between EPP = 32 and EPP = 84? I have found that they both work about the same so I just let Windows manage this and I settle for 84.

You still think I should disable it?
That is totally up to you. I prefer not to have my computer fighting with itself.
 
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I think you can edit the hidden Speed Shift settings in the Windows power plan. You might be able to do that to get Windows to write 32 to the EPP register instead of 84. If you do not do that, you will always end up with ThrottleStop and Windows writing different EPP values to the same register.

Is there any big difference in performance between EPP = 32 and EPP = 84? I have found that they both work about the same so I just let Windows manage this and I settle for 84.


That is totally up to you. I prefer not to have my computer fighting with itself.
Do you know how to change it in the power plan? I don't think I have the option but I also have no idea how to do it.

I've tested it, throttlestop will take full control when plugged in but windows will take full control when not plugged in. That's just how it works on my end.
 

unclewebb

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Open up a command window and type in

powercfg -qh >C:\power.txt

Copy and paste the data from the power.txt file into www.pastebin.com so I can have a look for this hidden setting. The power.txt file will be in your main C: directory after you run that command. I think the EPP setting can be adjusted here.

Code:
    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863  (Processor energy performance preference policy)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000000
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000032

Look for the value 0x00000040

0x40 hex is equivalent to 84 decimal.
 
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Open up a command window and type in

powercfg -qh >C:\power.txt

Copy and paste the data from the power.txt file into www.pastebin.com so I can have a look for this hidden setting. The power.txt file will be in your main C: directory after you run that command.
Command doesn't work for me, I get nothing in output.
 

unclewebb

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The output should end up in a file called power.txt in your C directory. Did you look for that file?
 

unclewebb

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Here are the two settings for your computer. My desktop computer uses the first one. The Windows slider when you have a laptop might use the settings in the second one. You will need to experiment to see if you can change these.

Code:
    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863  (Processor energy performance preference policy)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000000
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000046

    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6864  (Processor energy performance preference policy for Processor Power Efficiency Class 1)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP1
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000021
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000032

You can use this setting to go back to the default setting.
Code:
powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 33

or

powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 0x21

A setting of 33 is equivalent to 0x00000021 in hex. You can enter decimal values from 0 to 100 or hex values from 0x00 to 0x64 directly into that command.

The setacvalueindex allows you to make changes to the AC profile and use setdcvalueindex to make changes to the DC or battery profile.

The PERFEPP option allows you to change the first set of EPP values and the PERFEPP1 option allows you to change the second set of EPP values.

After you make a change, use ThrottleStop to cycle to a different power plan. Go from Balanced to High Performance and then back to Balanced so this change takes effect. You can also enter this command to force Windows to update EPP.

powercfg /s SCHEME_BALANCED

Make sure Speed Shift EPP is not checked in ThrottleStop. Now you can monitor the EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. Let me know if you figure anything out. A Windows setting of 13 should get you close to EPP = 32

255 X 0.13 = 33

If you are not quite sure, tell me exactly what you are trying to do and I will try to come up with the appropriate command.

The default EPP 84 value comes from this

255 X 0.33 = 84

That is why when this is set to 33 or 0x21 hex, the CPU sets EPP to 84.
 
Last edited:
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Here are the two settings for your computer. My desktop computer uses the first one. The Windows slider when you have a laptop might use the settings in the second one. You will need to experiment to see if you can change these.

Code:
    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863  (Processor energy performance preference policy)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000000
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000046

    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6864  (Processor energy performance preference policy for Processor Power Efficiency Class 1)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP1
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000021
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000032

You can use this setting to go back to the default setting.
Code:
powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 33

or

powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 0x21

A setting of 33 is equivalent to 0x00000021 in hex. You can enter decimal values from 0 to 100 or hex values from 0x00 to 0x64 directly into that command.

The setacvalueindex allows you to make changes to the AC profile and use setdcvalueindex to make changes to the DC or battery profile.

The PERFEPP option allows you to change the first set of EPP values and the PERFEPP1 option allows you to change the second set of EPP values.

After you make a change, use ThrottleStop to cycle to a different power plan. Go from Balanced to High Performance and then back to Balanced so this change takes effect. You can also enter this command to force Windows to update EPP.

powercfg /s SCHEME_BALANCED

Make sure Speed Shift EPP is not checked in ThrottleStop. Now you can monitor the EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. Let me know if you figure anything out. A Windows setting of 13 should get you close to EPP = 32

255 X 0.13 = 33

If you are not quite sure, tell me exactly what you are trying to do and I will try to come up with the appropriate command.

The default EPP 84 value comes from this

255 X 0.33 = 84

That is why when this is set to 33 or 0x21 hex, the CPU sets EPP to 84.
Thanks for telling me how it works, but what I want to do is keep my EPP at 128. This is usually when I'm playing non-demanding games and whenever I'm just using the web browser which is what I do 90% of the time.

When plugged in I set the slider to best performance, when unplugged I set it to better battery.

The other 10% of the time is when I'm playing actual demanding games where I prefer EPP at 32 whenever I want.

If I wanted to switch between these two settings conveniently using only windows power slider, is that possible and if so with what commands?

Here are the two settings for your computer. My desktop computer uses the first one. The Windows slider when you have a laptop might use the settings in the second one. You will need to experiment to see if you can change these.

Code:
    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863  (Processor energy performance preference policy)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000000
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000046

    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6864  (Processor energy performance preference policy for Processor Power Efficiency Class 1)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP1
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000021
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000032

You can use this setting to go back to the default setting.
Code:
powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 33

or

powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 0x21

A setting of 33 is equivalent to 0x00000021 in hex. You can enter decimal values from 0 to 100 or hex values from 0x00 to 0x64 directly into that command.

The setacvalueindex allows you to make changes to the AC profile and use setdcvalueindex to make changes to the DC or battery profile.

The PERFEPP option allows you to change the first set of EPP values and the PERFEPP1 option allows you to change the second set of EPP values.

After you make a change, use ThrottleStop to cycle to a different power plan. Go from Balanced to High Performance and then back to Balanced so this change takes effect. You can also enter this command to force Windows to update EPP.

powercfg /s SCHEME_BALANCED

Make sure Speed Shift EPP is not checked in ThrottleStop. Now you can monitor the EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. Let me know if you figure anything out. A Windows setting of 13 should get you close to EPP = 32

255 X 0.13 = 33

If you are not quite sure, tell me exactly what you are trying to do and I will try to come up with the appropriate command.

The default EPP 84 value comes from this

255 X 0.33 = 84

That is why when this is set to 33 or 0x21 hex, the CPU sets EPP to 84.
I tried forcing EPP, when plugged in it just stays at 0 EPP no matter what with speedshift off. It just doesn't work. I honestly think throttlestop speedshift works better than windows.

When unplugged windows just overrides the EPP, but I only care about adjusting it when plugged in which is when I play games so it doesn't matter.

Here are the two settings for your computer. My desktop computer uses the first one. The Windows slider when you have a laptop might use the settings in the second one. You will need to experiment to see if you can change these.

Code:
    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6863  (Processor energy performance preference policy)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000000
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000046

    Power Setting GUID: 36687f9e-e3a5-4dbf-b1dc-15eb381c6864  (Processor energy performance preference policy for Processor Power Efficiency Class 1)
      GUID Alias: PERFEPP1
      Minimum Possible Setting: 0x00000000
      Maximum Possible Setting: 0x00000064
      Possible Settings increment: 0x00000001
      Possible Settings units: %
    Current AC Power Setting Index: 0x00000021
    Current DC Power Setting Index: 0x00000032

You can use this setting to go back to the default setting.
Code:
powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 33

or

powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP1 0x21

A setting of 33 is equivalent to 0x00000021 in hex. You can enter decimal values from 0 to 100 or hex values from 0x00 to 0x64 directly into that command.

The setacvalueindex allows you to make changes to the AC profile and use setdcvalueindex to make changes to the DC or battery profile.

The PERFEPP option allows you to change the first set of EPP values and the PERFEPP1 option allows you to change the second set of EPP values.

After you make a change, use ThrottleStop to cycle to a different power plan. Go from Balanced to High Performance and then back to Balanced so this change takes effect. You can also enter this command to force Windows to update EPP.

powercfg /s SCHEME_BALANCED

Make sure Speed Shift EPP is not checked in ThrottleStop. Now you can monitor the EPP value in the FIVR monitoring table. Let me know if you figure anything out. A Windows setting of 13 should get you close to EPP = 32

255 X 0.13 = 33

If you are not quite sure, tell me exactly what you are trying to do and I will try to come up with the appropriate command.

The default EPP 84 value comes from this

255 X 0.33 = 84

That is why when this is set to 33 or 0x21 hex, the CPU sets EPP to 84.
Ok throttlestop works really weird on laptop but I also think the windows power slider doesn't work too well on it either.

Now my laptop seems to adjust with throttlestop's EPP when plugged in and unplugged after restarting. Doesn't look like windows is fighting for control anymore.
I've given up trying to let window's do it's thing, the commands you gave me really don't work unfortunately :/

Do let me know if you have any other solution though!
 
Last edited:

unclewebb

ThrottleStop & RealTemp Author
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Messages
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I've given up trying to let window's do it's thing
I gave up trying to fight against Windows. You are correct that how Windows manages EPP can be hard to understand. Odd that it works one way when plugged in and works differently when running on battery power. I have a desktop computer so I just use the Windows High Performance power plan which automatically sets Speed Shift EPP to 0. I do not own a recent laptop that supports Speed Shift so I cannot help you figure out how Windows handles EPP on your laptop.

I honestly think ThrottleStop Speed Shift works better than windows.
You answered your own question. Continue using ThrottleStop to manage Speed Shift EPP. At random times or when on battery power there might be fights with Windows over EPP and at other times, ThrottleStop will be in complete control of EPP.

I tried forcing EPP, when plugged in it just stays at 0 EPP no matter what with Speed Shift off.
If you let Windows manage EPP, some Windows power plans will force EPP to 0 for the first couple of minutes after booting up. After things settle down, the EPP value will randomly change to lower the CPU speed. This seems to be a Windows trick. Running the CPU at max speed helps to ensure a fast boot up. Windows undocumented control of EPP makes testing difficult.
 
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I gave up trying to fight against Windows. You are correct that how Windows manages EPP can be hard to understand. Odd that it works one way when plugged in and works differently when running on battery power. I have a desktop computer so I just use the Windows High Performance power plan which automatically sets Speed Shift EPP to 0. I do not own a recent laptop that supports Speed Shift so I cannot help you figure out how Windows handles EPP on your laptop.


You answered your own question. Continue using ThrottleStop to manage Speed Shift EPP. At random times or when on battery power there might be fights with Windows over EPP and at other times, ThrottleStop will be in complete control of EPP.


If you let Windows manage EPP, some Windows power plans will force EPP to 0 for the first couple of minutes after booting up. After things settle down, the EPP value will randomly change to lower the CPU speed. This seems to be a Windows trick. Running the CPU at max speed helps to ensure a fast boot up. Windows undocumented control of EPP makes testing difficult.
Yep, that makes sense but the thing is on battery mode it goes from 178 to 0 during regular use, not startup which is strange but when it's 0 it doesn't even go to max frequency, looking more like a number error.

I appreciate the help you gave either ways, in the future I think I might be able to let windows slider do it's thing if I can just change some values for the "best performance" and "better performance."

It seems to differ on battery mode where "best performance" is only 84 which is why this is likely an issue.

If you know how to change the values for both battery and AC mode that would be great and I could try it out.
 

unclewebb

ThrottleStop & RealTemp Author
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If you know
All I know is what I posted above. You need to adjust the PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 values for both AC and DC to find out how Windows uses these values. After making any changes, you need to switch to a different power plan and then back to the one you are on.

but when it's 0 it doesn't even go to max frequency, looking more like a number error.
If you see anything unusual, post a screenshot so I can see ThrottleStop and the FIVR monitoring table. Most laptops have the C states enabled so when lightly loaded, you might not see max frequency.

It seems to differ on battery mode where "best performance" is only 84
That is another Windows feature. The slider in the system tray works differently whether you are plugged in or on battery. Best Performance might use one EPP value when plugged in and a different EPP value when running on battery power. The PERFEPP setting might control one of these and PERFEPP1 might control the other. Have fun testing.
 
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Thanks, but I'm a bit confused about how to configure the EPP values on the slider.

How would I go with this process if I wanted to make both the AC and battery mode sliders the same?
What I want is "best performance" on both power modes to be 32 and "better performance" to be 128.

Do you think you could help guide me on doing that with the command you gave me? I don't know exactly how the command works, but here is how I think it works:

Let's say I was on AC mode and used powercfg /setacvalueindex SCHEME_BALANCED SUB_PROCESSOR PERFEPP 0x21. If I was on the "best performance" slider would this only apply to that slider?
 

unclewebb

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I do not have access to a laptop that uses Speed Shift Technology. On my desktop computer, I only need to adjust PERFEPP.

Do some Google searching for PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 and Speed Shift. There should be some more info out there somewhere. You will have to play around with these settings to try to figure out what they do on your laptop.
 
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I do not have access to a laptop that uses Speed Shift Technology. On my desktop computer, I only need to adjust PERFEPP.

Do some Google searching for PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 and Speed Shift. There should be some more info out there somewhere. You will have to play around with these settings to try to figure out what they do on your laptop.
I see, but could you provide insight on how to do it on just desktop with just PERFEPP? I could try doing the same thing on battery mode and see if it works.

For example, are you able to adjust "best performance" to 32 and "better performance" to be 128 and could you tell me how on just one mode?
 

unclewebb

ThrottleStop & RealTemp Author
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are you able to adjust "best performance" to 32 and "better performance" to be 128
Desktop computers do not use a power slider in the system tray. With a desktop computer, you can go into the Power Options and choose High Performance or Balanced or Power Saver. These three power plans set EPP to 0, 84, 153.

In Windows Power Saver, PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 are both set to 0x3C which is 60 in decimal.

255 X 0.60 = 153

so the default for this power plan sets EPP to 153.

You might have to change both the PERFEPP and PERFEPP values. I have no idea how a laptop uses these settings.

You can use the commands that I have listed to change these values. Only you can find out if making these changes accomplishes what you are trying to accomplish.
 
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Desktop computers do not use a power slider in the system tray. With a desktop computer, you can go into the Power Options and choose High Performance or Balanced or Power Saver. These three power plans set EPP to 0, 84, 153.

In Windows Power Saver, PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 are both set to 0x3C which is 60 in decimal.

255 X 0.60 = 153

so the default for this power plan sets EPP to 153.

You might have to change both the PERFEPP and PERFEPP values. I have no idea how a laptop uses these settings.

You can use the commands that I have listed to change these values. Only you can find out if making these changes accomplishes what you are trying to accomplish.
I've also tried to disable speedstep, windows slider will work correctly but unfortunately there is no way to customize the values with the commands you've given. I'll be using throttlestop speedshift for now. Thank you for the help you've given.

Desktop computers do not use a power slider in the system tray. With a desktop computer, you can go into the Power Options and choose High Performance or Balanced or Power Saver. These three power plans set EPP to 0, 84, 153.

In Windows Power Saver, PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 are both set to 0x3C which is 60 in decimal.

255 X 0.60 = 153

so the default for this power plan sets EPP to 153.

You might have to change both the PERFEPP and PERFEPP values. I have no idea how a laptop uses these settings.

You can use the commands that I have listed to change these values. Only you can find out if making these changes accomplishes what you are trying to accomplish.
Just wondering, should I leave speed step on? It doesn't seem to conflict with EPP and just helps save power overall.

Also does the windows power slider do anything other than change EPP? Will it affect other performance factors? The description for what the different modes do are very vague on the website: Customize the Windows performance power slider | Microsoft Docs

Desktop computers do not use a power slider in the system tray. With a desktop computer, you can go into the Power Options and choose High Performance or Balanced or Power Saver. These three power plans set EPP to 0, 84, 153.

In Windows Power Saver, PERFEPP and PERFEPP1 are both set to 0x3C which is 60 in decimal.

255 X 0.60 = 153

so the default for this power plan sets EPP to 153.

You might have to change both the PERFEPP and PERFEPP values. I have no idea how a laptop uses these settings.

You can use the commands that I have listed to change these values. Only you can find out if making these changes accomplishes what you are trying to accomplish.
Edit: I seem to be able to edit the values in AC mode, but not battery mode but the settings do not change for "best performance." Better performance and better battery mode will share the same values given in the command you gave me. I think I will be able to adjust to this without having to use speedshift.

However, I'm still wondering if all the windows power slider does is change EPP or not.
 
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unclewebb

ThrottleStop & RealTemp Author
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When Speed Shift is enabled, SpeedStep enabled or disabled makes no difference. SpeedStep is no longer used.

I'm still wondering if all the windows power slider does is change EPP or not.
I am not sure what the power slider can control. It might also change the screen brightness. I do not have access to a Speed Shift aware laptop so I cannot do any testing.
 
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When Speed Shift is enabled, SpeedStep enabled or disabled makes no difference. SpeedStep is no longer used.


I am not sure what the power slider can control. It might also change the screen brightness. I do not have access to a Speed Shift aware laptop so I cannot do any testing.
Doesn't change the brightness, from what I know EPP is the same on better battery and better performance, but maybe better performance might favor a little bit more performance than battery saving.
 

unclewebb

ThrottleStop & RealTemp Author
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EPP is the same on better battery and better performance
Some laptops use the exact same EPP value for different settings. It makes people feel good when they believe that they can get better performance or better battery life. The reality is that if EPP is the same then there is no difference to performance or battery life.

I have not been able to measure any real world performance difference whether EPP is set to 32 or 84. EPP controls how much load it takes to get the CPU up to full speed. With either setting, the CPU should have no problem maintaining maximum speed when it is loaded. As soon as you start playing a game, the CPU is loaded so performance is probably exactly the same.

I found that if EPP is increased to 128 or beyond, maximum performance will start to decrease.
 
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Some laptops use the exact same EPP value for different settings. It makes people feel good when they believe that they can get better performance or better battery life. The reality is that if EPP is the same then there is no difference to performance or battery life.

I have not been able to measure any real world performance difference whether EPP is set to 32 or 84. EPP controls how much load it takes to get the CPU up to full speed. With either setting, the CPU should have no problem maintaining maximum speed when it is loaded. As soon as you start playing a game, the CPU is loaded so performance is probably exactly the same.

I found that if EPP is increased to 128 or beyond, maximum performance will start to decrease.
I think QuickCPU was causing some additional issues since I realized the "performance" slider actually changes EPP and I had no idea. Uninstalled.

It essentially changed window's default EPP in the same way you gave me the commands but caused the EPP value to sometimes be shown as "0." On battery mode I still cannot customize EPP values but that's not an issue.

I can configure the middle slider on AC, I think this is the extent to what can be changed. Thank you again for going through this with me.

Some laptops use the exact same EPP value for different settings. It makes people feel good when they believe that they can get better performance or better battery life. The reality is that if EPP is the same then there is no difference to performance or battery life.

I have not been able to measure any real world performance difference whether EPP is set to 32 or 84. EPP controls how much load it takes to get the CPU up to full speed. With either setting, the CPU should have no problem maintaining maximum speed when it is loaded. As soon as you start playing a game, the CPU is loaded so performance is probably exactly the same.

I found that if EPP is increased to 128 or beyond, maximum performance will start to decrease.
One last thing I'd like to ask is does throttlestop ever park cores? Does it usually utilize all threads at all times and is it even possible for it to park cores? https://prnt.sc/1u3gtb6
I found these settings by default, can you tell me what the C7% means for the CPU cores and if my settings are fine?
 
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