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Air Cooling -- Myths and setup tips for the novice performance / gaming builder

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I've noticed there seem to be some rather ridiculous and utter myths and misinformation regarding cooling, particularly air cooling. First and foremost, a popular tech YouTuber did a comparison video testing various air and liquid cooler performance, concluding that while liquid cooling did deliver more consistent temperatures, they were only SLIGHTLY lower – 5C or less, and that air coolers performed quite comparably when properly sized and set up. They made a statement in that video – that liquid cooling was cool if you like to spend more time tinkering with your PC as opposed to using it. To me, that pretty much says it all, as a difference of less than 5 degrees in temp is more or less identical.

NOTE: If you’re planning a simple budget build with less than eight cores and entry-level graphics and other hardware, you won’t need a ton of cooling – in fact, stock air coolers should be just fine in most cases. However, if your build is a stepping stone to bigger and better later on, it makes sense to pave the way for this in choosing components with better cooling in mind for any future upgrade. Otherwise, you’re spending more money in the long run.

My 5900X build's cooling system uses an iCUE Commander with six 120mm fans, and the Scythe Mugen 5 which uses a 120mm fan, seven in total, but they don’t even run that hard below 70C. As illustrated in the screenshots below, CPU Package temperature idles in the 38C-42C range. Under light to moderate use, it hovers around 48-58C, sometimes as high as 63C. Cinebench R23 is the stress test to end all stress tests as far as I’m concerned. And even with a 30-minute CB R23 loop, temp peaks at 75-76C. Post-test recovery to idle temp range takes around 45-90 seconds. So it cools quite well, and at just 34 square inches of intake area for cooling, my Corsair 4000X case is hardly the best-ventilated case on the market -- the 4000D Airflow would do even better, although the 4000X has air filters where the D does not.


1198095244_Cinebench-HWinfoStressTestTemps.png.7e2dd486539ce4dcd19190d8f246652f.png



My build was hardly a typical process or timeline, but I admit that in the planning stage for my build, I was skeptical of air-cooling and thought the 5900X needed liquid cooling, but others convinced me that a properly set up air cooler is plenty for even the most robust builds, and more reliable than liquid cooling. However, component selection and initial set-up are a bit more critical. As no one else seems to have done so, I thought I'd explain a few myths and misconceptions, as well as share some insight on component selection and tips for proper setup of an air-cooling system.

MYTH #1 – “My processor requires liquid cooling”

This simply is not true in 99.99% of cases. While it is true that more cores and more threads = more heat, my recent R9-5900X build is proof that air-cooling is more than sufficient for consumer market applications. This is not meant to bash those who like liquid cooling, but VERY little, if anything, on the consumer market actually requires liquid cooling. Also, I feel it often is a band-aid for poor component selection and / or an off-the-shelf answer for those who don’t understand how to properly set up air cooling, or the dynamics of cooling.

MYTH #2 – “Air coolers are junk. They don’t work”

This is not true, either. Air coolers do take a bit more care in component selection and time in initial setup. But properly set up, they are actually more reliable than liquid cooling in most, if not all cases. However, certain factors determine whether a particular cooler is suited to your needs. A poorly-ventilated case can actually insulate the components, making your system a furnace even the best cooling system can’t tame. Conservatively speaking, poorly-ventilated cases hamper cooling by as much as 30-50%, and that’s not the cooler’s fault. For example, you simply cannot stuff a 360mm AIO into an NZXT H510 and expect it to cool. It simply will not be able to get air to do so, because the front is solid steel and your radiator is blocking your airflow. Common sense.

Cooling requires three things – heat transfer, ventilation, and airflow. Hotter processors need bigger coolers, because a cooler’s surface area determines heat transfer ability. Too little surface area substantially hinders cooling. Think of it this way – if you were to cut a Mugen 5’s heat sink into three equally sized sections top to bottom and lay them end-to-end, its surface area is quite comparable to a liquid-cooled radiator. Air coolers simply stack their surface area, where liquid radiators spread it out. Some also use two fans, as opposed to one, which can make a difference.

Another pair of factors apply to the larger, higher-performance air coolers as well. The impact of heat sink size has already been explained. However, what’s underneath impacts cooling capacity as well, and I don’t mean the processor. First, some have more heat transfer tubes than others. For example, the Scythe Mugen 5 has six heat tubes transferring CPU plate heat to the heat sink. Most, if not all Noctua offerings, such as the NH-U12A, have seven, others can have as few as three or four. And this directly impacts cooling capacity, as to a point, more tubes = better cooling.

That being said, it MUST be made for your processor and suited to your setup. My 12-core 5900X cools quite well with the six-tube Mugen 5, so while it may not be an official formula or manufacturer’s recommendation, it makes sense to theorize that air coolers need one tube for each pair of processor cores. And I think this is the biggest factor in misconceptions about air-cooling, that those having issues with air-cooling are simply not selecting the right cooler for their needs.

But there’s another factor to look at here, as shown below. This is one area where airflow comes into play. The right-side cooler has six heat transfer tubes, compared to the left-side cooler’s four. In addition, the right-side cooler’s tubes are also perfectly round throughout the cooling circuit. The left-side cooler’s tubes flatten / taper sharply at the CPU plate, reducing their diameter. This is a bottleneck and also impacts cooling capacity. No pipe (or tube in this case) can flow more than its smallest diameter.


image.png.3ed97de5679572621700f0178d0719ac.png



So, as you can see, a PC system’s cooling and performance both come down to component selection. Case selection has a bigger impact on this than you might think. There’s nothing wrong with a case that uses tempered glass / acrylic panels, but be sure it either provides some sort of air gap around the nose or side for air intake, as well as ventilation to the top.

System board choice can impact cooling as well. Many don’t know that boards have a voltage regulator module (VRM) that controls voltage to the processor. This effectively controls clock speed, but also has an impact on temperature as well. And cooling the VRM is critical with processors with higher clock speeds and core/thread counts. This is easy to determine. Some boards have no heat sink near the processor socket. Others may have one or two, some have larger ones than others. Bigger is better in this situation, especially with processors known for running hotter.

Something to note about fan choice. Quieter fans may not perform as well as others, but you’re not stuck with airplane noise, if you’re willing to put a little work into a custom fan control profile, which I’ll get to shortly. And with a well-designed and well-ventilated case (open grill front such as the Corsair 4000D Airflow), three 120s can flow more than two 140s. My setup has three 120s pulling in at the nose, two exhausting topside, one exhausting to the rear, and one blowing across the cooler heat sink.

MYTH #3 – “Air coolers aren’t cost effective”

MAJORLY not true. Most budget / entry-level builders can find air-coolers to serve their initial needs for under $30-$50, depending on their CPU choice. Even the best ones are cheaper than a liquid cooling setup. Noctua’s NH-D15 averages $100-$110 USD. The Scythe Mugen 5 cools quite well and at an average of $50-$60 USD, I think it is hands-down the best bang for the buck for CPUs over eight-cores.

EASY SETUP OF AN AIR COOLING SYSTEM

First, use the proper thermal paste, and properly apply it. Too little won’t cool well and too much will spill onto the board and other components, potentially damaging them. You don’t need a lot, just a thin coating on the processor lid (two or three dots on the lid center are usually sufficient), and take care to wipe any excess squeezing out over the lid edges as the cooler is tightened down.

Tuning your case fan control curve is key. Most don’t like the airplane noise of constantly wide-open fans. Good news – it’s not necessary anyway. In a well configured cooling system, the fans generally need not exceed 70-85% capacity, as the upcoming screenshot of my fan curve shows. Also, the more options your fan controller software has, the better this will work. I use iCUE, which has adjustable settings to lock the fans at fixed percentages and RPM, as well as a custom fan curve, such as the one I use, shown below. Note that one size does not necessarily fit all when it comes to fan control curves.


image.thumb.png.def524406a5bf3711eef44acdbc8136a.png


Step 1: Most fan controllers can be set to a certain RPM and / or percentage of total output. Most fans max out around 900-1400 rpm, some at 1600. With the system idling (only your fan control software running), set all fans wide open for five minutes to get your lowest temperature. I know this will be annoying to listen to initially, but it is necessary to find the coolest temp your system can run. If you’re not seeing low 40s Celsius or better here, something is hindering cooling performance – my 5900X idles at 38C-42C.

Step 2: Every 1-2 minutes, dial your fans down 5%, or 100-250 RPM. Keep doing this until the temp starts rising, then dial the fans back up another 5% or 100-250 rpm to regain your lowest temperature. At this point, note your lowest temperature and fan RPM or percentage setting necessary to maintain it.

Step 3: If you don’t have it, download and install Cinebench R23.

Step 4: Set your fan control to wide open again.

Step 5: Set Cinebench R23 options for a 30-minute multi-core test, then start, minimizing the Cinebench window and switching to your fan control.

Step 6: Watch your CPU Package temp until it stops rising. If all is well, it should top out around 85% of max safe temp. NOTE: If it rises beyond 90-95% of max safe temperature for longer than 30 seconds, abort Cinebench and check to see that all fans are running and blowing the correct direction. Fans can create a deadlock of airflow when positioned and running against each other.

Step 7: Noting your highest stable temperature reading, repeat Step 2, noting the percentage / RPM setting necessary to maintain your recorded stable peak temp. When this has been determined, you can terminate the test.

Step 8: Open your fan controller software’s custom fan curve settings. Most will show dots on a graph, marked as fan percentage / RPM vertically, temperature setpoints horizontally. Each dot represents a setpoint.

Step 9: If silence is preferred, set your first setpoint at zero percentage or RPM just below or at your lowest temperature. Set your second setpoint by your lowest temperature and corresponding fan percentage / RPM setting. (Example: 0% below 30C, 20% at 30C)

Step 10: Find your fourth, fifth or sixth setpoint. Set it to your highest temp and fan percentage / RPM setting.

Step 11: The hard part is now over. The other setpoints between your high and low can now be tweaked to find a balance between stable temperatures and noise level.
Welcome to TPU AnOmaly_76!

There's always a place for a good guide imo.
*IF you're prepared to care for it.*
Of course all guides must be vetted properly. That's the easy part.
The second part of an effective guide is having someone there to consistently answer all of those newbie questions. That means you OP (shes your baby afterall). That's the difficult part. Most guides are abandoned because the questions are almost always repetitive, very similar and they get boring. Help will be plentiful at first but inevitably it will die off. That's when you will prove your mettle or not.

May your guide be a success and help many a new member!!
 
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No offence, but that isn't a demanding heat load.

Or particularly good temperatures.

Air cooling has it's place, so does liquid cooling. Simply because your use case has acceptable results on air does not prove or disprove anything.

You seem to essentially be setting up an argument noone is making, then refuting it, before coming to conclusions not supported by evidence.

Here's an example of what liquid cooling can do (silently), while running a CPU + GPU under load, pushing locked 1440p 236 FPS, from a single 240 mm radiator in a case the size of a shoebox.

View attachment 268596
I have a small single tower air cooler on a 12900k. Score 30k cbr23 at 270 watts or roundabout. Yes, temps will get high (94-95c) after 30 minutes, but that's 270 watts on a small air cooler.
 
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Let me know when you find a

I'm that .01% because NO air cooler can handle 300+ watts.
Depends on the CPU being used, I think it's possible. Seeing how my u12a can cool 270w on a 12900k, it should be able to hit 300 on the bigger 13900k die. A bigger heatsink like FC140 or assassin 3 would p robably achieve this a little bit easier as well
 
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Depends on the CPU being used, I think it's possible. Seeing how my u12a can cool 270w on a 12900k, it should be able to hit 300 on the bigger 13900k die. A bigger heatsink like FC140 or assassin 3 would p robably achieve this a little bit easier as well

IceGiant CPU cooler :D
61smPF-HoZS.jpg
 

Mussels

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I believe the short version of this is

Budget AIO watercooling is garbage and aircooling is the better choice until you pass a certain threshold
Any CPU can be ran on any cooler, it's just that weaker performing coolers require louder fans


  1. The size of the heatsink/coolant dictates how long it can take heat before it saturates
  2. fan speed dictates how fast they cool.
  3. Low threaded workloads erratic will be fine with a big cooler and low fan speeds, which is why AIO's shine for gaming builds


So when you're buying:
  1. Physically smaller CPU's need a high quality contact surface (Get a good branded heatsink, air or water even if its just as 120mm tower) (AM4)
  2. High wattage CPU's need more cooling area (larger heatsink or radiator Intel/AM5)
 
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Depends on the CPU being used,
Not really. That is, the CPU being used determines how much heat may be generated and needs to be extracted. But the efficiency of the CPU's cooling systems depends on many factors besides the CPU.

Heatsink composition (pure copper conducts heat better than aluminum),
Contact surface composition (an aluminum heatsink with a copper contact surface is better than all aluminum, but not as good as all copper),
Cleanliness of the mating surfaces,
Flatness of the mating surfaces,
Perfection (fewer microscopic pits and valleys) of the mating surfaces,
Heatsink size,
Heatsink design (lots of fins creating greater surface area results in more efficient extraction of heat from heatsink,
Proper application of TIM (thermal interface material),
Heat transfer efficiency of TIM,

Cooler's fan(s) (more CFM across fins for greater extraction of heat),

And last, but certainly not least - or of less importance - is case cooling. It is the case's responsibility to ensure there is a sufficient supply of cool air flowing through and out the case, with no stagnant pockets of heated air. And it is the user's responsibility to set up case cooling. The case must bring in a sufficient supply of cool air AND exhaust the heated air out of the case. The CPU cooler need only move the CPU's heat away from the CPU and into that flow, or directly out the case. If the case fails to exhaust the heat out of the case, it does not matter how efficient or effective the CPU cooler is.

Many are surprised at how much cooler, and more stable (and quiet!) their entire computers run (CPU, GPU, RAM, PSU, motherboard, etc.) just by adding or upgrading to a decent, and relatively inexpensive case fan in front (to pull more cool air in) or in back to push more heated air out. Of course, the case must be about to support adding or upgrading the fan. If not capable, then maybe the user needs to upgrade to a better case!

And let's not forget, ambient (room) temp plays a HUGE role here too. Even the best, most efficient liquid cooling system is incapable of cooling anything lower than the ambient temp. It takes some sort of "active" cooling system, such as refrigeration, to achieve that. That "threshold" mentioned above is exactly the same regardless if air cooled or liquid cooled. It just typically takes a little longer to get there with liquid.
 
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I have one of those - Modified it so I can use it with my older AMD stuff such as AM3 for example but can now be used for anything from AM2 to AM3+ and still used for AM4 too.
Yes, it's actually a good cooler.
Only caveat is how expensive these things are but they do cool well.


Not really. That is, the CPU being used determines how much heat may be generated and needs to be extracted. But the efficiency of the CPU's cooling systems depends on many factors besides the CPU.

Heatsink composition (pure copper conducts heat better than aluminum),
Contact surface composition (an aluminum heatsink with a copper contact surface is better than all aluminum, but not as good as all copper),
Cleanliness of the mating surfaces,
Flatness of the mating surfaces,
Perfection (fewer microscopic pits and valleys) of the mating surfaces,
Heatsink size,
Heatsink design (lots of fins creating greater surface area results in more efficient extraction of heat from heatsink,
Proper application of TIM (thermal interface material),
Heat transfer efficiency of TIM,

Cooler's fan(s) (more CFM across fins for greater extraction of heat),

And last, but certainly not least - or of less importance - is case cooling. It is the case's responsibility to ensure there is a sufficient supply of cool air flowing through and out the case, with no stagnant pockets of heated air. And it is the user's responsibility to set up case cooling. The case must bring in a sufficient supply of cool air AND exhaust the heated air out of the case. The CPU cooler need only move the CPU's heat away from the CPU and into that flow, or directly out the case. If the case fails to exhaust the heat out of the case, it does not matter how efficient or effective the CPU cooler is.

Many are surprised at how much cooler, and more stable (and quiet!) their entire computers run (CPU, GPU, RAM, PSU, motherboard, etc.) just by adding or upgrading to a decent, and relatively inexpensive case fan in front (to pull more cool air in) or in back to push more heated air out. Of course, the case must be about to support adding or upgrading the fan. If not capable, then maybe the user needs to upgrade to a better case!

And let's not forget, ambient (room) temp plays a HUGE role here too. Even the best, most efficient liquid cooling system is incapable of cooling anything lower than the ambient temp. It takes some sort of "active" cooling system, such as refrigeration, to achieve that. That "threshold" mentioned above is exactly the same regardless if air cooled or liquid cooled. It just typically takes a little longer to get there with liquid.
Bill is right about all this but the single most important factor I've noticed is cooling inside the case itself.
A cooler always has to depend on the air already inside the case that's getting heat from other components too and if that's warm/hot, your chip will be warm as well - No way around it.

That should always be a "First Step" to check and fix if required for solving problems with things getting too warm for a typically encased setup - Make sure it's getting good airflow to and through the case for removing heat in the first place and the rest should follow if all else is OK.
And if not, I guess you still have some work to do.
 
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but the single most important factor I've noticed is cooling inside the case itself.
Right - which is why I said where you quoted me,
If the case fails to exhaust the heat out of the case, it does not matter how efficient or effective the CPU cooler is.
 
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Exactly, that backs up your statement because you nailed it.

I've noted the same thing myself and said as much to that end to emphasise the point of it - A point you made no less.
 

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Air cooling can be tricky. A major advantage to an AIO is that it has a direct source of fresh outside the case air, something that most air coolers do not get. That is a large reason why most people say its night and day the first time they use one. Chances are their system was under ventilated to begin with since no one except me likes computer noise haha. When air cooling a CPU, everything depends on how much air you can get in and out of the case. I'm not saying you need 700CFM through your case (I've tried) But a solid supply from a well designed airflow chassis is better than cooling in open air Imo.

Edit:

700CFM through a Meshify C is pretty impressive :laugh:
 
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Air cooling can be tricky.
Ummm, but liquid cooling is not?

Another HUGE issue with liquid cooling (and tower/upright/side firing air coolers) is the heat sensitive devices clustered around the CPU socket are often starved of cool air they would otherwise get with an air cooler, particularly a downward firing air cooler. If those devices lack the necessary cooling, stability may be impacted.

Hoses can become brittle with age, crack and leak. Fittings can come loose, and leak. Impellers can seize. And all kinds of evil, wicked, mean and nasty stuff :fear:can grow inside that loop if any air manages to get inside.

A major advantage to an AIO is that it has a direct source of fresh outside the case air
This is true. But then that heated air (1) gets pumped into the case where it may affect other heat sensitive devices - unless (2) there is an adequate flow of air exhausting that heated air out.

I am just saying, "tricky" applies to whatever type cooling we use.
 
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Let me just get this out there right away: I love my AIO/open-loop watercooling setups. And I would rather put a 120mm AIO, at a bit higher cost, than a similarly performing air cooler in a more reasonably specd computer. Unless the budget is so low that I use the stock cooler. I am not saying there are anything wrong with air cooling. But my preference is to move the hot part to the case exhaust.

Another HUGE issue with liquid cooling (and tower/upright/side firing air coolers) is the heat sensitive devices clustered around the CPU socket are often starved of cool air they would otherwise get with an air cooler, particularly a downward firing air cooler. If those devices lack the necessary cooling, stability may be impacted.

Hoses can become brittle with age, crack and leak. Fittings can come loose, and leak. Impellers can seize. And all kinds of evil, wicked, mean and nasty stuff :fear:can grow inside that loop if any air manages to get inside.
Let's be honest here. Most air coolers, that are not stock, will be tower coolers that do not provide good air flow to the VRM(++) either. Proper use of case fans is much more important these days. And motherboard manufacturers are aware, even budget offerings have heatsinks on the heat "sensitive" parts near the CPU socket these days. Just like my bent motherboard horror story below, this is not a HUGE issue anymore. The HUGE issue would be failure to have good air flow through the case.

My personal horror story is having experienced a couple motherboards that, over time, bent enough under the load of an air cooler to die. Obvious banana shape when put on a flat surface. Luckily I would say this only have a chance to happen if you use a substantial air cooler on a motherboard with few layers these days. But I just prefer to not hang a weight off the top of the motherboard. Add the fact I can move the hot part to an exhaust port and that is my main reasoning for using AIOs. I have no grand illusions that they offer better performance. I just want the same performance with better control of where the heat goes. Unless we get into custom open-loop watercooling, but that is an entirely different beast.

Are there more failure modes for an AIO? Sure. They can spring a leak. Pump can die. Manufacturers have done oopsies so the cooler fills up with gunk. What are the odds it happens to you? Pretty damn low.
I don't have any statistically significant personal experience with them, but it is a two-digit figure that does not start with 1. For me the only failure has been an old 120mm Silverstone first gen AIO that started dripping after about 6 years. You find pre-built computers with AIO coolers from big, mainstream manufacturers now. They build computers in the many thousands a month. I gurantee they would've quickly stopped using AIOs if a significant portion died and took the rest of the computer with it.

In the end there are no correct answer to this. Air coolers and AIO coolers both have their positive and negatives. Your preference can be based on build requirements, educated knowledge, user experience (If I had a few AIOs burst and kill computers I would not prefer them anymore for sure), looks, religious beliefs, coin flip, and more. Imho this is another of those AMD vs Nvidia/Intel (fanboy) type of discussions.

I have a degree in computer engineering with a touch of mechanical engineering and fluid mechanics on the side. I favour AIO coolers based on my technical knowledge, and user experience/preference. But I can't fault a good air cooler either. You do you. And make sure you have good airflow through your entire case no matter your choice of cooler!
 
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And the bottom line is:
And make sure you have good airflow through your entire case no matter your choice of cooler!
^^^This!^^^
 

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Nice OP! Well done and welcome
 
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I think this has been brough up before, but worth mentioning again: an air-cooled CPU might deliver some air flow to the VRMs, while a water-cooled CPU might leave the VRMs without air flow.

If so, this would favor air cooling over water.
 
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To half of the posts since my last one, i can spot the intel users

You're all focused on the high wattage parts and what it's like dealing with them, but i can guarantee you higher case airflow and spinning those fans up on the CPU cooler will do nothing for a 5800x or 5900x - because they truly only care about how good your contact is between the IHS and the baseplate of your heatsink.

Custom water didnt change my temps compared to a be quiet dark rock slim, a tiny 120mm air cooler - because the contact on that tiny die area was the limit of getting heat to the cooler, not getting heat out of the heatsink


Yes, it matters to know about the CPU you're getting. You need to know if it's high wattage, but low wattage parts can run hot too - for entirely different reasons with entirely different solutions
 
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To half of the posts since my last one, i can spot the intel users

You're all focused on the high wattage parts and what it's like dealing with them, but i can guarantee you higher case airflow and spinning those fans up on the CPU cooler will do nothing for a 5800x or 5900x - because they truly only care about how good your contact is between the IHS and the baseplate of your heatsink.

Custom water didnt change my temps compared to a be quiet dark rock slim, a tiny 120mm air cooler - because the contact on that tiny die area was the limit of getting heat to the cooler, not getting heat out of the heatsink


Yes, it matters to know about the CPU you're getting. You need to know if it's high wattage, but low wattage parts can run hot too - for entirely different reasons with entirely different solutions
Try ocing a 5800X and not get it to 90C... :roll:
 

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Intel wattage only sounds scary. Hitting 250-300w has been a thing since Westmere.


Edit:

235w on 7nm is just as tough..
 
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Lemme stick my 120's in the case - I've got a pair of 170 cfm and a single 240 cfm fan, all being Delta fans.
If those can't move enough air to help nothing will.

BTW I'd also need some noise-cancelling earmuffs for everyone in the house and takeoff clearance everytime I'd start it up.
 

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Lemme stick my 120's in the case - I've got a pair of 170 cfm and a single 240 cfm fan, all being Delta fans.
If those can't move enough air to help nothing will.

BTW I'd also need some noise-cancelling earmuffs and takeoff clearance everytime I'd start it up.
Lol yup when I was running all iPPC I could hear the system from the basement on the main floor no problem! It was far too intense to daily :D
 
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To half of the posts since my last one, i can spot the intel users

You're all focused on the high wattage parts and what it's like dealing with them, but i can guarantee you higher case airflow and spinning those fans up on the CPU cooler will do nothing for a 5800x or 5900x - because they truly only care about how good your contact is between the IHS and the baseplate of your heatsink.

Custom water didnt change my temps compared to a be quiet dark rock slim, a tiny 120mm air cooler - because the contact on that tiny die area was the limit of getting heat to the cooler, not getting heat out of the heatsink


Yes, it matters to know about the CPU you're getting. You need to know if it's high wattage, but low wattage parts can run hot too - for entirely different reasons with entirely different solutions
Υeap, zens are just harder to cool due to density - way smaller dies need much better contact. Intel doesn't care about contact that much cause it's a huge die

Lol yup when I was running all iPPC I could hear the system from the basement on the main floor no problem! It was far too intense to daily :D
If you really really don't care about noise, get the fhp141s. I swear youve never seen anything like it in terms of airlfow and static pressure. You cannot use them if your PC is in the same room as you, they create all kinds of noises (vibrations, rattling etc.) but man do they deliver on performance. I have some a12x25s, some phanteks t30s, some 180x38 and a bunch of ippc's, nothing compares to the fhp141. To give you an idea, I turn off my GPU fans and spin the fphs at 100%, the pressure is that much that fancontrol registers my GPU fans as spinning at 600 rpms. That's just naughty.
 
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Lemme stick my 120's in the case - I've got a pair of 170 cfm and a single 240 cfm fan, all being Delta fans.
If those can't move enough air to help nothing will.

BTW I'd also need some noise-cancelling earmuffs for everyone in the house and takeoff clearance everytime I'd start it up.
Hi,
Yeah I've gone mostly with manual fan controllers to avoid the startup crap
I just give the boards a couple bs sp fans to mess up :laugh:

By the way nice tips on the op although "myths" for every good cooler there are a lot of bad ones so that is not a myth it's fact
Same goes for aio's and custom water cooling parts and designs as well not myths again just fact.
 
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@An0maly_76
Thanks for putting together this guide, I'm sure it will be useful to a lot of people. Air cooling is certainly good enough for most use cases, and the importance of adequate air flow cannot be overstressed.

And while many users of this forum will consider themselves enthusiasts/experts in computer matters, let's not forget that for every member there are 10-100 unregistered people visiting TPU at any one time. Not all of them may have the knowledge and experience of some of the regulars here.
 
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