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Arctic Cooling Releases Freezer 64 LP

Discussion in 'News' started by D_o_S, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. D_o_S

    D_o_S Moderator

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    Arctic cooling, well known for its CPU and GPU heatsinks, has officially launched the Freezer 64 LP (Low Profile).

    Arctic cooling states that it is a "Ultra high performance dual fan AMD CPU cooler for low profile PC".

    [​IMG]

    The design of Freezer 64 LP ultra high performance dual fan achieves the ultimate cooling effect that dramatically cools the AMD CPU even inside a tiny chassis. Freezer 64 LP’s 2 vertical cooling fans draw a large amount of cold air from both sides that cool the CPU fast and effectively. 3 copper heat pipes directly connected from the CPU core transfer heat out of the core rapidly.

    Features:
    • Dual Fan Cooling
    • 3 Heat Pipes
    • Extremely Quiet
    • Special Design for Low Profile PC Case
    • Advanced 4 Directions Ventilation for Chipset and Voltage Regulators
    • Patented Fan Design
    • 6 Years Warranty

    Additionally the design of the Freezer 64 LP cools the surrounding chipset and voltage regulators and operates at just 1/3 of the noise level as the stock cooler and this even under heavy loading. Freezer 64 LP definitely gives the ideal cooling solution for high performance low profile HTPC applications.

    The recommended retail price (excl. VAT) is 24 USD / 20 EUR. The heatsink is compatible with all AMD Sempron, Athlon 64, Athlon 64 X2 Athlon 64 FX and AMD Opteron (Socket 939 and AM2) CPUs.

    Source: Arctic Cooling
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 28, 2007
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  2. WarEagleAU

    WarEagleAU Bird of Prey

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    Nice...this may be the cooler I use in my HTPC Im building in the next few months.
     
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  3. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    Lets hope how the fans are set as one PUSH and other SUCK... but I have my doubts. Probably both PUSHING.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2007
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  4. Scavar

    Scavar New Member

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    One fan should be set to pull and one to push shouldn't it? At leasts what I would think.
     
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  5. AshenSugar

    AshenSugar New Member

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    depends on the design, i have had areocool coolers where push/push was better then push/pull, it all depends on the design of the cooler, if designed properly push/push could be better then push/pull.


    nice design tho, cant wait to see it reviewed :D
     
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  6. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    In a LP case you want to "tunnel" air from front to back, or back to front, or side to side.... but NOT stir it all up leaving the hot air in the case.

    The cooler really SHOULD push/pull. The cooling is optimised with a wind baffle to case openings.

    @ashen. I dont doubt your experience. In a large case without "managed" airflow... your experience could be correct.

    But if PROPERLY DESIGNED... the cooler is integral to the case and air flow management. Push/Pull IS the optimal solution.

    ***

    In practice you will find many suboptimal cooling arrangements due to limited availability of fans. This about the Artic cooling fans. They need to design a fan that spins in the opposite direction optimised for sucking not pushing. Then they need to make it. And low volumes. = very expensive.

    So design and manufacturing contraints usually lead to non-optimised solutions
     
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