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Bad News. "Haswell-E paste Thermal grease"

cadaveca

My name is Dave
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#26
Dave likes to rofl a lot :p XD
Yeah, because unlike every other reviewer I have talked to... who has ES... I have retail CPU.

So, I know what the end user will really get. Which makes most discussion about all of this quite funny. Many sites have missed the mark about what Intel is doing for so long, but because I don't do CPU reviews any more, it's not my place to say what's what. And because most of those sites are so focused on OC, they can't see the forest for the trees. And if it's their job to show everyone what's coming, and what's here... and they don't really know... HOW could anyone else?

These chips are soldered. With an added bit of epoxy around the core to hold it in place when mounted to the PCB. TWO COMPLETELY different adhesive techniques, for two different purposes.
 
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#27
ES or Retail they are all soldered.
Just because it's soldered does not mean you can't pop the heat spreader off, you need a heat gun for this just like we used to use with gulftown CPUs and before.
 

cadaveca

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#28
ES or Retail they are all soldered.
Just because it's soldered does not mean you can't pop the heat spreader off, you need a heat gun for this just like we used to use with gulftown CPUs and before.

That's pretty much what I think is the case. Those that really need to de-lid, will. Time will tell of course.
 
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#30
I don't get it why are companies always saving on tiny stuff, making crap products just because they want more profit. Use a god damn solder and charge extra 5 bucks on every bloody CPU. When you pay freakin 400 bucks for a CPU, you won't gonna care about extra 5 bucks, and they'll still have the same profit as if they don't charge extra 5 bucks, but use shitty epoxy instead. Jesus.
The problem is that it isn't something you charge $5 for. Soldering has to heat the CPU to approximately 90 C. That kind of heat may damage the CPU if not controlled, costs money to do, and requires skilled labor. That $5 worth of solder material probably costs Intel $20 per chip, once they've binned out defective units and paid for skilled labor.

On the other hand, you've got epoxy. Mechanically combine two chemicals, plop down bead, apply IHS. The materials may cost Intel $7 per chip, but they save $10 on having unskilled laborers and significantly less toasted chips.


I agree that a $400 or more CPU should run as cool as possible. The thing is, Intel doesn't sell tons of socket 2011 parts, they sell tons of the much cheaper socket 1150 parts. If they could save $10 a chip they can plow a ton of money back into R&D, to maintain their output of technology and actually start competing with ARM on the low power devices.

All of this assumes that Intel won't just call it a huge earnings boon. Personally, I think once temperature is no longer the failure point of OCs, as has been the case with the last two generations of the mainstream line, that Intel can use whatever they want to for a thermal solution. Socket 2011 has yet to achieve this lofty goal though, so I agree it should still be soldered.
 
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#31
Well, you overpay that 2011 to begin with, so apply the damn solder on it!
 
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#32
Well, you overpay that 2011 to begin with, so apply the damn solder on it!
....?

By what standards are you judging that I've overpaid for a CPU. Everybody shows hate for a perceived price gouging from Intel, but there never seems to be anyone rushing to the plate with evidence of this price gouging.

Here's what I can prove. Intel is extremely profitable, as demonstrated by their quarterly earnings. Intel has plowed large amounts of money into fabrication and research, because they own their own foundries and have numerous patents. Intel is run by money hungry people, as demonstrated by numerous anti-trust suits. Intel's legal team, presumable on retainers, is world class. This is based upon the ratio of lawsuits they've been involved in, compared with the lawsuits that are settled without a court decision.

All of this seems like Intel is a company out for money, because they are. If you want to moan about pricing don't buy their products. If you want to play games there's AMD CPUs, and all the major consoles run with AMD technology. If you don't give Intel your business they'll change their attitude.


What I see instead is people complaining that there aren't 10 core 20 thread processors for $60 out there. People whine and moan that AMD performance doesn't match that of Intel. If you don't want to pay the price, then don't buy the CPU. There's a reason I don't buy Nvidea GPUs, and it isn't because they somehow are worse than AMD. If you don't support a company they will change their ways. If all you want to do is complain, then you're not going to change anything.
 

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#35
How can you just add extra pins to a board when every cpu only has so many contacts?
 
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#36
How can you just add extra pins to a board when every cpu only has so many contacts?
It's a BS argument. Think of a bed of nails. That bed doesn't penetrate you when you lie on it, because the gravitationally exerted force of your mass is tiny per pin.

Asus seems to be arguing that more pins mean less force, less force means less distortion, less distortion means a greater area in contact with the pads on the CPU. That greater contact area means less resistance (combined with less mechanical stress induced resistance), so the electrical properties will be better. It isn't a completely unreasonable claim, but assuming you add 100 extra pins, you've got a 100/2011= 5% increase in surface area. Assuming the latching force is 200 N, you're looking at .099 N per pin or 0.094 N per pin. Mechanically, that's functionally not a difference. While the claim may be mathematically true, it's unlikely to be something you'd notice.
 
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#37
How can you just add extra pins to a board when every cpu only has so many contacts?
I believe what this means is that if in the instance the- hassel beat me to it
It's a BS argument. Think of a bed of nails. That bed doesn't penetrate you when you lie on it, because the gravitationally exerted force of your mass is tiny per pin.

Asus seems to be arguing that more pins mean less force, less force means less distortion, less distortion means a greater area in contact with the pads on the CPU. That greater contact area means less resistance (combined with less mechanical stress induced resistance), so the electrical properties will be better. It isn't a completely unreasonable claim, but assuming you add 100 extra pins, you've got a 100/2011= 5% increase in surface area. Assuming the latching force is 200 N, you're looking at .099 N per pin or 0.094 N per pin. Mechanically, that's functionally not a difference. While the claim may be mathematically true, it's unlikely to be something you'd notice.
Agreed. I was about to post that. I was told that the CPU had extra pins but just saw that picture/marketing claim. I doubt that extra pins would do anything like that
 
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#38

OneMoar

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#39
Yeah, I have to eat my words here. Check out this thread, http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/your-haswell-e-max-stable-oc.204965/#post-3160450

Gist of it is that there are more than 2011 pins, for diagnostics. ASUS is going around the Intel BS to make an awesome overclocking platform. Funny that they don't say it in the marketing, but not surprising.
no BS about it those pins are for diagnostic's and some are voltage check points used in the binning process
they allow ASUS to bypass some of the FIVR logic and increase voltage stability