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Best Video Editing Laptop

Mitchie123

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We would really need a good laptop to do video editing. The checklist is the Display (at least Full HD, 1920х1080 pixels), CPU (3 GHz and higher), RAM (at least 8GB), Video card (recommended NVidia GeForce RTX) and SSD storage. They all work together to come up with a very powerful machine to do editing needs. Anyone has any recommendations?
 
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Recommendation would be: learn more about PCs or leave this choice to the store you'll be buying from.

Dell XPS 15 or MacBook Pro.
 
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Do you really need a portable computer for this? The problem is, notebook makers can pack the power of a PC into those tiny notebook cases, but they can't pack in the cooling. Video editing can be very demanding. If you consider even good standard size tower PC cases are challenged to keep their innards properly cooled, it is easy to see how a tiny notebook case might have problems. The result is the notebook hardware is frequently forced to "throttle" back speeds and performance to keep heat at bay.

I do think you are being wise to go with a SSD and at least 8GB of RAM. Beyond that, you need to state your budget. And if going with a notebook, knowing what size screen you want is important. Also, other factors like battery run times might be important too.
 

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cbell77

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We would really need a good laptop to do video editing. The checklist is the Display (at least Full HD, 1920х1080 pixels), CPU (3 GHz and higher), RAM (at least 8GB), Video card (recommended NVidia GeForce RTX) and SSD storage. They all work together to come up with a very powerful machine to do editing needs. Anyone has any recommendations?
You need to look at gaming laptops to meet your needs. Keep in mind most budget gaming laptops have poor screens so unless you plan on using an external monitor make sure you are prepared to spend the premium price for one with a good screen. While I don't like the way Alienware laptops look they do boast good specs and good screens as well as usually have good deals going on. Razer is another option but they charge a high premium.
 
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Do you really need a portable computer for this?
Yeah, 2019 calling!

Notebook is the default PC today. Desktop is the cumbersome, weird alternative ("Do you really need a desktop for this?")
Don't confuse him. He should buy a laptop.

It's only a question of price and mobility-performance compromise. I've given him the best "mobile" choices. We'll see what he says.
 
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Notebook is the default PC today.
No its not. Maybe for you but certainly not for everyone.
"Do you really need a desktop for this?"
For video editing? Absolutely! When spending potentially hours at a time performing such tasks, a full sized keyboard, high definition precise tracking mouse and at least a 24" (preferably 27") high resolution monitor that is sitting out in front of you (saving your neck) is absolutely the way to go - if mobility is not a must.

Don't confuse him. He should buy a laptop.
Don't confuse the OP with your biased opinions, or worse, try to stifle opinions that are different than yours. :(

Sure, one can attach a full-sized keyboard, mouse and external monitor to a notebook. But if mobility is not a requirement, that surely is not the most efficient or best configuration. No notebook is truly a real "desktop replacement" - in spite of what notebook marketing hype would have some believe.
 

Mitchie123

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yeah, agree that these specs could all come into a portable laptop. I will most likely go into Dell XPS.
 
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I hope I'm not hijacking this thread (seems a bit pointless starting a new one), but I'm also looking into a laptop for video editing (for my stepson) as well as having just suggested a laptop to a friend who is buying one for his daughter who uses CAD, so that's two, but similar applications.
The first thing I asked was which programs are being used and in the case of my friend's daughter, it's Photoshop, Autocad, Sketchup, Lumion, Twinmotion and Revit. She's currently using a Toshiba Satellite C55-C1M9 which has a Celeron N2830 dual-core, 4Gb RAM and Intel HD graphics. Clearly not a powerhouse and so she's struggling.
I'm having to source the new laptop here in Argentina and so I recommended a Lenovo L340 Gaming Laptop which should power through her design programs, with Intel Core i5-9300H Processor, 8GB DDR4 RAM, 1TB HDD, 128GB NVMe SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050.
Now, my stepson has his heart set on a MacBook and yes, he needs a laptop because he does freelance video editing for adverts and TV shows. Very often he doesn't get a job because he doesn't have a decent laptop.
He uses Adobe Premier Pro and After Effects and he says that Mac hardware runs Adobe software much 'better' than Windows. I wouldn't know because although I'm well versed in gaming machines, video editing is somewhat more specialised. Having said that, knowing how well Ryzen handles rendering on my own PC, I'm pretty sure he couldn't go wrong with Ryzen, so I'm trying to steer him towards a Windows laptop, especially knowing that Macs are generally overpriced and sexy looking.
The baseline for fast video editing as far as I can see is at least a quad-core, 16Gb RAM, SSD or NVMe and a dedicated GPU, so I have to ask if the Lenovo I recommended for my friend's daughter would also be suitable for video editing? At half the price of a MacBook Pro, as well.
I forgot to say that he plans to but the laptop in February in Spain.
 
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Then old adage that laptops don't perform get a desktop is just that. ... an outdated concept. Today's lappies lose as little as 5% to their desktop counterparts

We use only custom built laptops ... far better than anything you can buy in a store and cheaper. But to use the programs listed, storage subsystem speed is the least of your concerns ... the load here is on the CPU / GPU. Keep in mind that just about every vendor you aver heard of doesn't actually make a laptop. See the post here ... it's for a gaming lappie but everything applies.


If I was doing these things "for a living" ... I'd want that fantasy build in the above link ... tho I would probably have the following for storarge:

OS and Programs Drive - SSD
Scrtach Files Drives - SSD
Archival Storage - SSHD

Given your stated "needs" ... (I personally find 3 GHz / 8GBg) .. I'd look at the custom built 2070 or 1660 Ti build depending on your budget and add the storage system above. it's better product than anything Dell has ... they don't actually make any laptops .... and it will cost you significantly less than an XPS. There are Clevo distributors all over the world. Im on the east coast of US and we have used LPC Digital for at least the last 10 - 12 years. I spoke to them last week regarding my 7 year old lappie ... the guy who took my order back in 2012 was the same guy I spoke to last week ....

I usually supply my own OS (download) so get all of ours w/o one.

 
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If price is no issue - check out any of the recently announced RTX Studio laptops. There are dozens of models from many brands.
Alternatively - any gaming laptop with Core H/HQ CPU and RTX GPU, and then just install an RTX Studio drivers(adds more features and HW acceleration for some tasks/effects/processing).
If i was in your place, I'd go with the second option, cause you won't have to pay premium for "Studio" at the end of its name.
Something like $1800 can get you a bad ass editing machine in form of Gigabyte Aero 15 with 4K OLED screen, i7-9700H and an RTX2060. If RTX acceleration is not critical - just get the lowest i7 model with OLED display - it'll be perfect.
 
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Then old adage that laptops don't perform get a desktop is just that. ... an outdated concept. Today's lappies lose as little as 5% to their desktop counterparts
That is not an old adage and where did you get that 5% value? Got a link?

The problem has never been about makers not being able to pack the performance into notebooks. The problem (and adage), as noted above, has always been that notebook makers can pack the performance into those tiny notebook cases, but they can't pack in the necessary cooling.

When you consider quality tower cases are challenged to keep their innards cooled during demanding tasks (like heavy gaming, graphics rendering, etc), it is no wonder those small, thin notebook cases can't. So this forces the notebook system to throttle back in order to keep temps in check. The performance capability and potentials are there, the cooling just can't sustain those performance levels.

Also, the interior of PC cases can easily be totally exposed simply by removing two screws (often thumbscrews) and removing the side panel. This then allows even an inexperienced user to gain access to thoroughly clean the interior of all the heat-trapping dust. Most notebook owners don't have the skills or in many cases, the tools to completely expose the interiors of notebooks for thorough cleaning.

So the problem is not about performance capability, its about keeping the components inside clean and cool enough so they can stretch their legs, reach and sustain those performance potentials.

*****

Suggesting the use of "customs built laptops" is misleading at best. There is no ATX Form Factor type standard for notebooks like there is for PCs. For that reason alone, there is no thriving notebook parts industry for users to pick and choose among 1000s and 1000s of components from 100s and 100s of different makers like there is with PCs. For that reason too, notebooks are extremely proprietary making custom (and upgrade!) options extremely limited.

Go out to Newegg, MicroCenter or whatever is your favorite parts supplier and count the number of different notebook cases you can choose from. See how many different monitors will fit in your case. Pick your motherboard from all those options :rolleyes:, choose your power supply, RAM etc. Then change your mind and pick a different case. Will your monitor and board fit? Probably not.

Notebook makers may tout their marketing "hype" about "customized" notebooks, but that's basically hogwash! Can you buy a MSI notebook and swap in an ASUS graphics card? No way.

There is no such thing as a "desktop replacement" that comes in a notebook case. That is pure marketing hogwash.
 
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@Bill_Bright
Posts keep getting longer.

Apart from your arguments being correct or not, you just seem very anti-notebook.
Why is that? Why don't you like notebooks?

Or is it because you're used to the 90s' style of using PCs? Maybe you're just not into the idea of caring around a computer and working on a bus?
I bet you're against cloud as well. :D
 
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Why is that? Why don't you like notebooks?
I do like notebooks - when used for their intended purpose which is when a portable computer is required. If your job or school needs require you have a mobile computing device, then by all means, a notebook is the way to go. I have a notebook and have had at least one for 20 plus years I use when I go on the road.

It is not that I dislike notebooks, I dislike, I mean I really dislike the misleading marketing hype we so often see about them. They are not good desktop replacements. And they don't make good gaming machines either - for the reasons I stated above. I also really dislike the fact they are so proprietary. Propriety always means higher costs and fewer options for the consumer.

Notebook makers love notebooks because they are huge cash cows for them - again because they are so proprietary. When a major component fails, it costs more to repair and users will often buy a whole new notebook. And the makers love that.

And yes, I am against the cloud too - but I use it. For sure, I trust the cloud will not lose my data. In fact, I am sure there are dozens of copies of everything we put out there. :rolleyes: For that reason, the cloud makes a great place to store [encrypted] backups of our data. But I do not trust the cloud to keep it secure and out of the hands of badguys. That is not the cloud's fault, however. It is the fault of the companies who are [supposedly] managing those servers and cloud networks.

As an electronics technicians, notebooks are marvelous pieces of high-tech computing devices. And I have nothing against the hardware - only the marketing weenies' hype about them, and the misinformation the ill-informed spread about them.
 
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That is not an old adage and where did you get that 5% value? Got a link?
Yes, I provided a link to a post which has all the data .... you just chose not to read it before responding. If your going to reply to a post, please read it 1st, including the links, and confine the responses to the subjects / technology actually referenced in the post ... there was no mention of any user built, home built, slim, Asus or MSI notebooks, yet this is the entire basis of your counterpoint. Im sure you are familiar that there exists "custom desktop builders" out there like Cyberpower where one can choose case, MoB CPU, GPU... yada yada yada and get a 'custom built PC" ... It was my understanding that folks could give you a list of parts and you would build them a "custom built PC" . I assume you would advise your user if the CPU / Case cooling system they selected was inadequate for their chosen componentry. The fact that you are unaware of the similar existence of a "custom laptop industry" is, well, surprising.

I never mentioned any teeny chassis laptop, only custom built. So the examples you gave with teeny chassis, MSI, Asusetc. are non-reponsive. Back in the day you could easily buy a laptop with desktop CPU / GPU ... even SLI'd GPUS. SLI lappies not as widely available today but you still can buy desktop components in a laptop chassis ... I had one custom Clevo build in the post you didn't read. Even today, your looking at almost 9 pounds for the ones housing desktop componentry. The cooling systems were and still today are custom designed to handle the applicable loads. After all these years, never had a cooling system issue....and I have run Furmark / RoG Realbench on all of them. If your experience is limited to slim, MSI / Asus factory built laptops ... how can you speak to the subject which specifically excludes any such consideration ?

If you are unaware of, or have you never opened a custom built laptop, I don't see how you are in any position to comment on how difficult they are to clean. You are also under the mistaken impression that you can't swap componentry. We are talking standard chassis designs here. There's really not that much involved ... remove about 7 teeny screws, remove the back cover, and turn on the air compressor . Just hold finger on the fans as yoiu can break them by overspinning. Did that once, replaced it. I have also swapped out GPUs, HDs, SSHDs, SSDs, memory... hardest swap was the CMOS battery. The cooling systems are massive, all copper with multiple fans and a manual "turn all fans on max" key combo. None of this exists in the realm of which you decribed but it does exist.

Returning to the now familiar theme of mistaken assumptions, the only thing misleading about "custom built" laptops is your mistaken assumption of what "custom built" means There was no mention of home built, user built or self built..... the words used were "custom built". Here's a link

Definition: "built to individual specifications"

There's no need for an elaborate / imaginary parts search scenario which you described. Apparently without your knowledge, a custom built laptop industry has existed for over 10 years. Its far from uncommon to see folks parrotting what they read on a website 8 years ago. Alienware, which opened in 1996 ... was probably the most well known provider and offered custom built desktops and notebooks for sale to the general public. Others included EuroCom, FalconNorthwest, Widow PC, XoticPC, ProStar, LPCdigital and others. Most of them get their chassis parts from Clevo ... if you had looked at the 2nd link in the previous post, how this industry operates would have been quite clear....

"Clevo is a Taiwanese manufacturer that creates barebones notebook chassis for other OEMs to fill in with the necessary specific hardware components, providing materials for companies like HP and Lenovo/IBM to put their finishing touches upon. A little known fact is that Alienware used to be a Clevo reseller until they became so profitable that they were bought out by Dell.

So here's how this works .....

1. Select Barebones Chassis a) 13-14" b) 15-16" c) 17" d) Workstations
2. Choose desktop componentry (i.e. 9900k) or mobile componentry
3. Choose CPU
4. Choose screen type / resolution
5. Choose options, dead pixel warranty, screen calibration
6. Choose GPU
7. Choose memory configuration
8. Choose OS or pick none
9. Choose thermal compound
10. Choose M.2 RAID options
11. Choose SSD 1
12. Choose SSD 2
13. Choose SSHD / HDD 1
14. Choose SSHD / HD 2
15. Choose M.2 RAID options
16. Choose Wireless / Bluetooth options
17. Choose Extended warrantees
18. Chose Express shipping if desired
19. Choose other accessories
20. Choose bag

Few days later, a laptop, "custom built to your specifications" arrives at your door step. Some vendors even offer custom splash screens, decals, paint jobs and other options

And, no ... I wouldn't attempt to put a buy a MSI notebook and swap in an ASUS graphics card because neithr Asus nor MSI make custom built laptops. Asus doesn't even ***make*** a single laptop. And yes, I have swapped GPUs, CPUs, HDs, SSDs, SSHDs, and RAM ... Remember... all these "custom built laptops" start with a chassis ONLY.

You asked for a link that was there ... you misstated what "custom built" means ... you were unaware of a custom built laptop industry and, as to the Hogwash, ya really should have clicked that link, the numbers don't lie. Here's some of the data you would have seen if you clicked it the link in original post

Was a time when buying a laptop meant significant drop in performance ... those days have gone the way of the VCR and Blockbuster. It's a new era and it's been here for quite some time. Unfortunately folks are still parroting web site posts from a decade ago referring to a world we no longer live in.

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Mobile-Graphics-Cards-Benchmark-List.844.0.html

The 5th ranked GPU listed in the GTX 2080 (Desktop) - Performance Rating = 76.7 ... 5% faster than the mobile version
The 8th ranked GPU listed in the GTX 2080 (Mobile) - Performance Rating = 72.8

The 2080 Desktop has the following 3D Mark Scores = 436117 / 143576 / 27620 / 40278
The 2080Laptop has the following 3D Mark Scores = 449825 / 139346 / 25440 / 35035
2080 3D mark Scores.jpg


3D Mark Ice Storm = +3% difference
3D Mark Cloud Gate = -3% difference
3D Mark Firestrike = -8% difference
3D Mark 11P = -15% difference

Would seem that te quote "Today's lappies lose as little as 5% to their desktop counterparts" needs revising ... shuda said "loses as little as 3% ... average was 5.75% in the four 3D Mark Tests

From there you can link to the game scores by clicking on the "Gaming Performance List" link ... again from the original link

Here are game scores as tested 1920 x 1080 High Preset ..... Game = 2080 Desktop Score (D) / 2080 Laptop Score (L)

Star Wars Jedi Fallen Order = 102 D / 117 L (+15%)
Need for Speed Heat = 124 D / 118 (-5%)
CoD Modern Warfare (2019) = 178 D / 168 L (-6%)
Grid (2019) = 140 D / 144 L (+3%)
Anno 1800 = 77 D / 76.8 L (< 0.5%)
Metro Exodus = 87.9 D / 86.9 L (-1%)
Far Cry New Dawn = 102 D / 105.5 L (+3%)
Shadow of the Tomb Raider - 117 D / 113 L (-4%)
Rocket League = 242.5 D / 248.0 L (+2%)
Based upon those numbers ... it would appear the "old adage" is exactly that. Still, we do have the "In real life" issue to deal with as to obtaining comparable test data . Outside of notebookcheck site, it's hard to find apples and apples numbers. How many laptop / desktop tests have you seen with both having a 9600k / 9700k or 9900k ? Same storage systems ? ... same chipset ? Which mobile GPU was used in the test ... the mobile 2080, the 2080 Qmax (90 watt) or the 2080 Qmax 80 watt ?

That's the thing... if you take the simplistic approach, comparing apples and strawberries ... you can compare some Asus design with a custom build top end box that doesn't give a care to battery life .... what is the 9900k / 2080 desktop being compared with ?

Are we talking 9900k, 9700k, 9600k, 9980 HK, 9750H, i5-9300H
Are we talking Z370 Chipset or HM370chipset ?
Are we talking mobile 2080 (150 watt), 2080 Q-max 90 watt TDP or 80 watt Q-max ... just about all store boughts are Q-max designs
Are we talking same storage subsystems ?

And that's the other issue ... in the typical desktop versus mobile testing. I have seen differenbces in single digit % differences...n I have also seen them break into the low 30s. The one in the 30s however, are usually well up over 90 / 100 fps where much of the gain is coming from the CPU. How much impact does that have on the store boghts 60 hz screen ?

So link to as many store bought test results as you can find, but unless they are apples and apples" it is irrelevant. The mobile 2080 has a 1380 Mhz base clock... the Q-max design is only 735. So yes, your store bought Asus / MSI may just apply to that old adage, tho no where near as much as it once did. But the subject of the post is limited to custom builts who are not limited to MaxQ designs ... and are therefore running at a base clock 88% faster than the mobile benchmarks you are looking at. The mobile 2080 clocks 92% as fast as the desktop version. If battery life is a concern, opt for the Qmax and take the performance hit. Personally, we almost never use our lappie on battery ... maybe when I need to look up a phone number or send a file, that's it.
 
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We would really need a good laptop to do video editing. The checklist is the Display (at least Full HD, 1920х1080 pixels), CPU (3 GHz and higher), RAM (at least 8GB), Video card (recommended NVidia GeForce RTX) and SSD storage. They all work together to come up with a very powerful machine to do editing needs. Anyone has any recommendations?
A budget is the biggest factor. Another factor is how much video are you editing? One 5 minute Youtube video a month? One a week? I know people who edit videos on the Intel IGP. Is it the optimum choice? Not really. Does it serve their purpose? Yep.

No its not. Maybe for you but certainly not for everyone.
Well, closing in 2:1 in favor of laptops over PCs

https://www.statista.com/statistics/272595/global-shipments-forecast-for-tablets-laptops-and-desktop-pcs/

For video editing? Absolutely! When spending potentially hours at a time performing such tasks, a full sized keyboard, high definition precise tracking mouse and at least a 24" (preferably 27") high resolution monitor that is sitting out in front of you (saving your neck) is absolutely the way to go - if mobility is not a must.
Not everyone needs it done yesterday. Also, guess which person gets to edit their videos wherever they want? Not the person tethered to the PC. Clearly, this person has already thought about the whole PC vs laptop thing. I don't think anyone goes in saying: Small keyboards, touchpads, and a small screen is exactly what I want when doing something that focuses on using keyboards, screens, and mice.

Sure, one can attach a full-sized keyboard, mouse and external monitor to a notebook. But if mobility is not a requirement, that surely is not the most efficient or best configuration. No notebook is truly a real "desktop replacement" - in spite of what notebook marketing hype would have some believe.
There are plenty of people that do nothing but check emails, browse cat videos, and watch pr0n. Their lappy tops would like to have a word with you about not being able to do their jobs. I know plenty of several businesses that deal with the web who have moved to laptops and can do all their development work, photoshop and video editing on GASP!!!!?! An Intel IGP!!!!>!! So, yes. There are many laptops that are truly desktop replacements. But darn, I guess it doesn't count because they take 4.5 seconds longer to do something.
 
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A laptop doing video editing is a lesson in fail.

The first problem is data transfer rate; I use Ultra SCSI 320, in raid 0 arrays.

The second problem is power of the processor; I think we can agree any laptop processor is a fail compared to the same processor in a desktop system.

Who wants to do video from laptops, that has at least shit for brains?
 
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A laptop doing video editing is a lesson in fail.

The first problem is data transfer rate; I use Ultra SCSI 320, in raid 0 arrays.

The second problem is power of the processor; I think we can agree any laptop processor is a fail compared to the same processor in a desktop system.

Who wants to do video from laptops, that has at least shit for brains?
I hope you know that all modern laptops have at least a SATA connection that tops out at around 560mb/s. Alot of laptop have nvme connections with higher transfer speeds than SCSI 320 in raid 0.

Laptops arent that bad, some of the higher end laptops have 8 core cpu's and some have desktop class cpu's. It depends on the fit of the person, but calling people shit brains because they do video editing on laptops is kinda dump.

I can do anything on a laptop that any person can do on a desktop. The best option is what ever fits that persons needs.
 
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Yes, I provided a link to a post which has all the data .... you just chose not to read it before responding. If your going to reply to a post, please read it 1st,
I did read it. And a sample size of 1 does not make an "adage".

All notebook cases are teeny compared to regular mid and full tower cases. Otherwise, you could hardly call them portable or mobile devices. And this discussion is not about "back in the day" mobile computers.

As for just about the entire remaining part of your post (tl:dr), I recommend you take you own advice and read what I said before posting. I clearly said "makers can pack the performance of a PC into notebook case". I guess you just chose not to read it before responding. So the rest of your post was just a waste.
If you are unaware of, or have you never opened a custom built laptop, I don't see how you are in any position to comment on how difficult they are to clean.
"If"? LOL

So you base your position on "if" statements, sample sizes of 1, and custom built notebooks which represent a tiny percentage of all notebooks. :kookoo:

And again, "IF" you had bothered to read what I said, you would note I said, "Most notebook owners don't have the skills or in many cases, the tools to completely expose the interiors of notebooks for thorough cleaning." And yes, that applies to custom built notebooks too.

Well, closing in 2:1 in favor of laptops over PCs
So what? More cell phones are sold than laptops. Does that mean cell phones make good "laptop replacements"? No! Does that mean cell phones are "the default PC"? No.

You guys seem to be arguing just to argue - with points that really make no sense, except in scenarios that apply to a small percentage of users.

Notebooks cannot do everything a PC can do. They cannot game at the same levels and sustain those levels (and remain mobile devices). Therefore, they are NOT desktop replacements. If don't see that, or refuse to accept that, then I am sorry - for you.

I have a notebook. I really like my notebook. It does EVERYTHING I need it to do when I am on the road. But you are not getting my mid-tower PC with its full sized keyboard, real mouse, both 24" monitors, 4 internal drives, or my full surround sound THX certified speakers until you can pry them from my cold dead hands.

I can do anything on a laptop that any person can do on a desktop.
No you can't - and that's a huge point here. Can you install 4 or 5 drives "in" your laptop? No. Can you swap out your graphics card? In most notebooks, no. In those where you can, do you have a choice of 100s of cards from dozens of makers? No. Can you attach 2 or 3 large monitors? 4 or 5 monitors? A sound card? Surround sound speakers? Can you swap out your entire motherboard, CPU and RAM for totally different brands? Can you upgrade your CPU cooler? Add additional case fans? Add a USB hub card? Can you replace the keyboard with a cherry red MX mechanical keyboard? Then change your mind and replace it with Blue?

Yes, you can attach a full size keyboard, mouse and external monitor - but then do you have a mobile computer anymore?

"IF" your notebook meets all your needs and desires, then that's great!!!! But stop pretending or trying to convince everyohn a notebook can meet everyone's desires and needs because the Laws of Physics and thermal dynamics just don't allow it. Once again, makers can pack the performance inside a notebook case, but not the necessary cooling to sustain those performance levels.
 
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You guys seem to be arguing just to argue - with points that really make no sense, except in scenarios that apply to a small percentage of users.
Notebooks cannot do everything a PC can do. They cannot game at the same levels and sustain those levels (and remain mobile devices). Therefore, they are NOT desktop replacements. If don't see that, or refuse to accept that, then I am sorry - for you.
Unfortunately, you really need to look in the mirror here on this. Just because a desktop will do it faster does not mean that a notebook can't do it and can't replace it. Will a desktop game better? Yes. Will it render videos faster? Yes. Can a notebook game? Yes. Can a notebook render videos? Yes. Until a notebook cannot render videos or play games, it can and will be a replacement. Stop saying that just because unit A is the best at task B that unit C can't replace it and do just fine.

Bill, since the topic of this thread is about video editing, tell the OP some part of video editing that you absolutely cannot do with a laptop and must use a desktop to complete.
 
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I did read it. And a sample size of 1 does not make an "adage".

All notebook cases are teeny compared to regular mid and full tower cases. Otherwise, you could hardly call them portable or mobile devices. And this discussion is not about "back in the day" mobile computers.

As for just about the entire remaining part of your post (tl:dr), I recommend you take you own advice and read what I said before posting. I clearly said "makers can pack the performance of a PC into notebook case". I guess you just chose not to read it before responding. So the rest of your post was just a waste.

"If"? LOL

So you base your position on "if" statements, sample sizes of 1, and custom built notebooks which represent a tiny percentage of all notebooks. :kookoo:

And again, "IF" you had bothered to read what I said, you would note I said, "Most notebook owners don't have the skills or in many cases, the tools to completely expose the interiors of notebooks for thorough cleaning." And yes, that applies to custom built notebooks too.

So what? More cell phones are sold than laptops. Does that mean cell phones make good "laptop replacements"? No! Does that mean cell phones are "the default PC"? No.

You guys seem to be arguing just to argue - with points that really make no sense, except in scenarios that apply to a small percentage of users.

Notebooks cannot do everything a PC can do. They cannot game at the same levels and sustain those levels (and remain mobile devices). Therefore, they are NOT desktop replacements. If don't see that, or refuse to accept that, then I am sorry - for you.

I have a notebook. I really like my notebook. It does EVERYTHING I need it to do when I am on the road. But you are not getting my mid-tower PC with its full sized keyboard, real mouse, both 24" monitors, 4 internal drives, or my full surround sound THX certified speakers until you can pry them from my cold dead hands.

No you can't - and that's a huge point here. Can you install 4 or 5 drives "in" your laptop? No. Can you swap out your graphics card? In most notebooks, no. In those where you can, do you have a choice of 100s of cards from dozens of makers? No. Can you attach 2 or 3 large monitors? 4 or 5 monitors? A sound card? Surround sound speakers? Can you swap out your entire motherboard, CPU and RAM for totally different brands? Can you upgrade your CPU cooler? Add additional case fans? Add a USB hub card? Can you replace the keyboard with a cherry red MX mechanical keyboard? Then change your mind and replace it with Blue?

Yes, you can attach a full size keyboard, mouse and external monitor - but then do you have a mobile computer anymore?

"IF" your notebook meets all your needs and desires, then that's great!!!! But stop pretending or trying to convince everyohn a notebook can meet everyone's desires and needs because the Laws of Physics and thermal dynamics just don't allow it. Once again, makers can pack the performance inside a notebook case, but not the necessary cooling to sustain those performance levels.
I did read it. And a sample size of 1 does not make an "adage".

All notebook cases are teeny compared to regular mid and full tower cases. Otherwise, you could hardly call them portable or mobile devices. And this discussion is not about "back in the day" mobile computers.

As for just about the entire remaining part of your post (tl:dr), I recommend you take you own advice and read what I said before posting. I clearly said "makers can pack the performance of a PC into notebook case". I guess you just chose not to read it before responding. So the rest of your post was just a waste.

"If"? LOL

So you base your position on "if" statements, sample sizes of 1, and custom built notebooks which represent a tiny percentage of all notebooks. :kookoo:

And again, "IF" you had bothered to read what I said, you would note I said, "Most notebook owners don't have the skills or in many cases, the tools to completely expose the interiors of notebooks for thorough cleaning." And yes, that applies to custom built notebooks too.

So what? More cell phones are sold than laptops. Does that mean cell phones make good "laptop replacements"? No! Does that mean cell phones are "the default PC"? No.

You guys seem to be arguing just to argue - with points that really make no sense, except in scenarios that apply to a small percentage of users.

Notebooks cannot do everything a PC can do. They cannot game at the same levels and sustain those levels (and remain mobile devices). Therefore, they are NOT desktop replacements. If don't see that, or refuse to accept that, then I am sorry - for you.

I have a notebook. I really like my notebook. It does EVERYTHING I need it to do when I am on the road. But you are not getting my mid-tower PC with its full sized keyboard, real mouse, both 24" monitors, 4 internal drives, or my full surround sound THX certified speakers until you can pry them from my cold dead hands.

No you can't - and that's a huge point here. Can you install 4 or 5 drives "in" your laptop? No. Can you swap out your graphics card? In most notebooks, no. In those where you can, do you have a choice of 100s of cards from dozens of makers? No. Can you attach 2 or 3 large monitors? 4 or 5 monitors? A sound card? Surround sound speakers? Can you swap out your entire motherboard, CPU and RAM for totally different brands? Can you upgrade your CPU cooler? Add additional case fans? Add a USB hub card? Can you replace the keyboard with a cherry red MX mechanical keyboard? Then change your mind and replace it with Blue?

Yes, you can attach a full size keyboard, mouse and external monitor - but then do you have a mobile computer anymore?

"IF" your notebook meets all your needs and desires, then that's great!!!! But stop pretending or trying to convince everyohn a notebook can meet everyone's desires and needs because the Laws of Physics and thermal dynamics just don't allow it. Once again, makers can pack the performance inside a notebook case, but not the necessary cooling to sustain those performance levels.
We are all talking about software. Some laptops can have 5 or 6 SSDs installed. I have 2 for sale on ebay, 5 nvme and 1 2.5in. I can have 28tb of storage on those each laptop, I already have 6tb on my current one.
Any laptop can have 2 or 3 monitors installed without any issue.
Some laptop can swap out the cpu, most can swap out memory without any issues.
Sound card??, who has one of those anymore. Some do, but most people dont.
I cant add fans or coolers, there's not room for that. USB hub, I can easily add that, take one of the spare USBs and add a USB hub or expansion, they sell them on amazon or ebay, wait 3 weeks for shipment from china.
 
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Why is it every thread gets this treatment, I know more then you. Blah blah, hell even a MAC book can do video editing not sure on the software side, I do know CAD is one of the most demanding software's out there as far as CPU goes.
 
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I hope you know that all modern laptops have at least a SATA connection that tops out at around 560mb/s. Alot of laptop have nvme connections with higher transfer speeds than SCSI 320 in raid 0.

Laptops arent that bad, some of the higher end laptops have 8 core cpu's and some have desktop class cpu's. It depends on the fit of the person, but calling people shit brains because they do video editing on laptops is kinda dump.

I can do anything on a laptop that any person can do on a desktop. The best option is what ever fits that persons needs.
I did some looking about current laptops after reading your comment; I can admit when I'm wrong.
There are laptops out there which beat the specs of my current desktops, and modern SSD's are faster with higher thruput than my SCSI arrays.

I need to invest in some new tech; I've spent way too much time converting video to be wasting my time on my old setup.

Sorry about My previous post, it's simply not correct anymore.
 
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95Viper

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Stay on the topic that was posted in the opening.
Stop your bickering and squabbling.
You don't help the OP going off on tangents.

Thank You.
 
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