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Black Holes

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This animation depicts a star experiencing spaghettification as it’s sucked in by a supermassive black hole during a ‘tidal disruption event’. In a new study, done with the help of ESO’s Very Large Telescope and ESO’s New Technology Telescope, a team of astronomers found that when a black hole devours a star, it can launch a powerful blast of material outwards.

 
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Since most if not all galaxies have a supermassive blackhole in the center, is it thought that its existence is necessary for the galaxy to exist? Seems like some sort of symbiosis must exist. Does the supermassive black change the curve of space/gravity for all layers of the galaxy?

Trying to wrap my head around some stuff, but it is difficult.
 
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@lynx raised important question: Do galaxies grow outside-in or inside-out? Astronomers assume that galaxies grow inside-out. Star formation starts at the core of the galaxy and spreads outward. For example NGC 3377 galaxy. It is also assumed that our Milky Way may have formed inside-out.

Biggest part of the galaxies is dark matter so black hole is not the main player there. Together they shape galaxies. Black hole is the core, dark matter is the scaffolding.
 
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When many of us think about black holes, we think of a huge cosmic event, sucking in everything around it. However, there is also the possibility of small black holes. “Einstein’s theory of relativity allows for black holes,” Kesden explains, “but doesn’t stipulate a size. It’s very possible that the early universe produced very small black holes. These would gravitate like massive black holes, floating through the universe and clustering.”

Is it possible Dark Matter is just a bunch of tiny black holes 'clustering' together?
 
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Is it possible Dark Matter is just a bunch of tiny black holes 'clustering' together?
Yup some scientists believed that micro black holes predicted by Stephen Hawking can be candidate for dark matter, but later other scientists kinda disproved that and showed that dark matter is some kind of unknown particle. But atm neither new particles nor tiny black holes are found.
 

dorsetknob

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Dorset where else eh? >>> Thats ENGLAND<<<
Is it possible Dark Matter is just a bunch of tiny black holes 'clustering' together?
Current physic's theory suggest that clustering Black Holes (small or large) would (be) merging into a larger black hole and its not sure if gravity effects Dark matter
 
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Is it possible Dark Matter is just a bunch of tiny black holes 'clustering' together?
No. Black Holes require a specific level of gravity to maintain a compressed state. Without that minimum gravity level an event-horizon can not be maintained and matter expands back out to it's normal physical dimensions.
Yup some scientists believed that micro black holes predicted by Stephen Hawking can be candidate for dark matter
Unfortunately Hawking never finished that theory and he couldn't finish it because the theory of General and Special Relativity(which is a base for all of Hawkings theories) have flaws. Therefore his predictions, while brilliant conceptually, have no merit.
and its not sure if gravity effects Dark matter
If "dark matter" existed, it would.
 
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Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don’t worry, this doesn’t mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA.



Based on the VERA Astrometry Catalog and recent observations by other groups, astronomers constructed a position and velocity map. From this map they calculated the center of the Galaxy, the point that everything revolves around. The map suggests that the center of the Galaxy, and the supermassive black hole which resides there, is located 25800 ly from Earth. This is closer than the official value of 27700 light-years adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1985. The velocity component of the map indicates that Earth is travelling at 227 km/s as it orbits around the Galactic Center. This is faster than the official value of 220 km/s.
 
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Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don’t worry, this doesn’t mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA.



Based on the VERA Astrometry Catalog and recent observations by other groups, astronomers constructed a position and velocity map. From this map they calculated the center of the Galaxy, the point that everything revolves around. The map suggests that the center of the Galaxy, and the supermassive black hole which resides there, is located 25800 ly from Earth. This is closer than the official value of 27700 light-years adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1985. The velocity component of the map indicates that Earth is travelling at 227 km/s as it orbits around the Galactic Center. This is faster than the official value of 220 km/s.

Err if that's the case, then the moon should also be effected by this.
 
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The first black hole ever discovered is more massive than previously thought. Cygnus X-1 is the heaviest stellar black hole observed without using gravitational waves.


The new observations suggest that Cygnus X-1 is ~ 7200 ly (9.5 trillion km) from Earth, rather than the previous estimate of ~ 6000 ly. This implies that the star in Cygnus X-1 is even brighter, and therefore bigger, than astronomers thought. The star weighs ~ 40.6 suns, the researchers estimate. The black hole must also be more massive in order to explain its gravitational tug on such a massive star. The black hole weighs ~ 21.2 suns — much heftier than its previously estimated 14.8 solar masses.

The first black hole ever discovered is more massive than we thought | MIT Technology Review
 
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The first black hole ever discovered is more massive than previously thought. Cygnus X-1 is the heaviest stellar black hole observed without using gravitational waves.


The new observations suggest that Cygnus X-1 is ~ 7200 ly (9.5 trillion km) from Earth, rather than the previous estimate of ~ 6000 ly. This implies that the star in Cygnus X-1 is even brighter, and therefore bigger, than astronomers thought. The star weighs ~ 40.6 suns, the researchers estimate. The black hole must also be more massive in order to explain its gravitational tug on such a massive star. The black hole weighs ~ 21.2 suns — much heftier than its previously estimated 14.8 solar masses.

The first black hole ever discovered is more massive than we thought | MIT Technology Review

I almost wonder if blackholes are what creates the big bang eventually... so the ever expanding theory and the universe dies a cold death has always made no sense to me because if time is linear like that we probably wouldn't be here. My new guess is that black holes become so giant, merge with other black holes, and over billions of years their mass and gravity sucking power becomes so extreme they collapse everything back in and BOOM new big bang, so a big bang cycle makes more sense to me. I don't know.

So let's say the ever expanding theory is true, well eventually the heat runs out and it all dies a cold death, so that would allow plenty of time for black holes to still be roaming about and merging together... hmm.
 
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When something is extremely energetic and dense (Big Bang) or extremely dispersed ('last days' of the Universe when all black holes congealed and evaporated) big/small/time/space have no meaning. It means Universe can start anew (Conformal Cyclic Cosmology). In other words spacetime can exist when "stuff" exists. Therefore, the end of one aeon is the beginning of the new one.
 
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is there evidence this is what happens to black holes? from everything I have read they just get bigger and bigger.
Like actual evidence? Nope, because largest black holes will take 10^106 years to evaporate, and Universe is about 10^10 years old so you'll need to wait that long and see.
But theory (Hawking radiation) is as true as it can get.
 
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Like actual evidence? Nope, because largest black holes will take 10^106 years to evaporate, and Universe is about 10^10 years old so you'll need to wait that long and see.
But theory (Hawking radiation) is as true as it can get.

I find it hard to believe something so large can evaporate into nothing. Black holes are not for me though, we just don't know enough about them yet imo. Is there proof that anything can evaporate into nothing? even when I sweat, that sweat is evaporated but its not nothing
 
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I also find it difficult to believe that the most destructive force in the galaxy could evaporate into nothing. Einstein gave up on black holes, his math describes everything else in existence, and imo Hawking is no Einstein.

All evidence is circumstantial because we are sitting on a planet all our calculations and observations are biased from our perspective, but I'm no Einstein either, though I would trust his math over any other theory regarding matter and the universe in general.
 
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is there evidence this is what happens to black holes? from everything I have read they just get bigger and bigger.
In short, no. Hawking Radiation is only a theory, he could never prove it, mathematically. In fact he never resolved the problems in several parts of his black-hole theory in general. Some if the physics predicted by General and Special Relativity have actually been disproven as observation of behaviors displayed by the universe itself contradict those predictions. Black-Holes only consume, they do not radiate. The idea of the "great rip" or the universe stretching itself out far enough to evaporate all matter is only a theory and not a very good one.
Yes there's direct and irrefutable evidence such as Vacuum Energy, Virtual Particles, Unruh Effect and so on. And there's indirect evidence that mass eventually fades out.
That is not evidence, as such. It is theory based on other theories. None of those postulations explain where the universe came from, why the Big Bang happened, nor how it happened. It's all based on General & Special Relativity, the math of which breaks down and is unsolvable when any mass object collapses into a black hole. Our universe sprang forth from an ultra massive black hole. G&SR can't not mathematically resolve those problems. So therefore, it is either partly or completely incorrect. It just so happens to predict some things correctly, however that is likely to just be coincidence.
 
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I wonder if it's possible that a big bang even occurs when everything else has separated so far apart from everything else - I keep imaging the pictures of the General Theory of Relativity that are really famous, where you place the Moon or Earth or the Sun in space, and you "imagine" it sitting and it creates a funnel type thing as seen below... well what if this isn't just imagination but truly like a fabric of some kind, and even though the distances are to great to measure any curve from say one galaxy to the next, they still act as like say buttons on this fabric, and a slight curve is present from galaxy A to B but its just slight its impossible to measure - then I wonder - what if galaxy A and B keep separating further and further apart - until boom the fabric simply can't take it anymore, and the buttons unbutton and gravity collapses in on itself, and the entire cosmos is warped in to a single tiny dense center - this could also explain how the big bang is able to condense everything into such a small area before the actual explosion takes place - all of that happening instantaneously... hmm. interesting. or perhaps I have lost my mind, who knows such things. an infinite cycle. as I mentioned earlier the sweat that evaporates off me does not become nothing - perhaps even in a scenario like this black holes themselves are instantly decimated, well yes they would in this scenario - and all that was becomes one, instantly - and since that is insane - it explodes in big bang. and 13.8 billion years later life starts to form again or eventually, statistically in a certain range anyway. quite beautiful if that is the case.

@R-T-B thoughts?

depositphotos_2232795-stock-photo-space-time-and-gravity.jpg
 
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