• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

BSOD Loop Throttlestop

Empecial

New Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
16 (0.35/day)
alright so what just happened is: i was undervolting my CPU core and cache. my core was at around -187 to -180 and my cache was around -145 to -140. i had my multiplier set up a bit to test it, around 31-32. my speedshift was 0, non turbo ratio was at 1, disable and lock turbo power limits was checked, my PP0 about 130 and turbo boost long powermax i believe was 45 and short power max was 55-60. and then it crashed, BSOD came up, i couldnt get in, it continued to crash, even when i was in blue screen checking the options. and if it started up i had about 1-2 minutes before it would crash again and this just kept happening. i deleted the throttlestop.ini to restart the settings as fast as possible since it also seemed to crash on the startup on that. i even tried safe mode but then it didnt accept the password to log in. what do you do in a situation like this?

edit: now, i cant even change my core to about -180 and my cache to about -130 without it crashing
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
7 (0.17/day)
Location
Germany
System Name Razer Blade 15 Advanced Mid-2019
Processor Intel i7-9750H
Motherboard CH350?
Cooling Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut
Memory Ballistix Sport LT 32GB DDR4-2666
Video Card(s) NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Max-Q
Storage Samsung SSD 970 EVO Plus 2 TB M.2
Display(s) BenQ XL2420Z
Audio Device(s) Razer Kraken 7.1 Chroma
Power Supply 230W
Mouse Razer Mamba Wireless
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow Ultimate
First of all, which CPU?
As far as i know, you should never have a difference between core and cache undervolting, they should always have the same value!
 
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
8,618 (4.13/day)
Location
Sunshine Coast
System Name Black Box
Processor Intel i5-9600KF
Motherboard NZXT N7 Z370 Black
Cooling Cooler Master 240 RGB AIO / Stock
Memory Thermaltake Toughram 16GB 4400MHz DDR4 or Gigabyte 16GB 3600MHz DDR4 or Adata 8GB 2133Mhz DDR4
Video Card(s) Asus Dual 1060 6GB
Storage Kingston A2000 512Gb NVME
Display(s) AOC 24" Freesync 1m.s. 75Hz
Case Corsair 450D High Air Flow.
Audio Device(s) No need.
Power Supply FSP Aurum 650W
Mouse Yes
Keyboard Of course
Software W10 Pro 64 bit
Tried clearing the CMOS?
 

unclewebb

RealTemp Author
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
1,921 (0.43/day)
It is very rare for a 9750H to be 100% stable when the cache voltage is offset to -145 mV or -140 mV. What sort of stability testing did you do along the way? If you ran a 1 or 2 Thread TS Bench test, it would probably be showing errors with the cache offset voltage set that lot. I would also run Cinebench R20 for some real world full load testing. With a mobile CPU, you need to be doing both part load testing and full load testing. Most BSODs when your undervolt is not stable happen when the CPU is lightly loaded. Typical cache offset voltage for this CPU is somewhere around -100 mV to maybe -125 mV. The cache offset voltage is the limiting factor. Keep that at -100 mV while doing your initial testing. Make sure your computer is stable at this setting in a wide variety of apps. Not you can adjust the core and do lots more testing.

ThrottleStop has this safety feature that most users immediately turn off.


If you are adjusting your CPU voltages and you have no idea if your CPU is going to be stable, tell ThrottleStop not to save these voltages. I would not use the save voltages immediately option until I had done a variety of stability tests and I was sure that my voltages were 100% stable. Most ThrottleStop YouTube videos I watch recommend turning off this safety feature immediately. Not good advice unless you enjoy being stuck in a BSOD loop.

If you ever accidentally enter some bad settings into ThrottleStop, boot up into Safe Mode, delete the ThrottleStop.INI config file, reboot and start again.

i even tried safe mode but then it didnt accept the password to log in.
That does not make sense but anything is possible. After a BSOD, fully power down your computer by holding the power button for 4+ seconds to reset your CPU and Windows.
 

Empecial

New Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
16 (0.35/day)
First of all, which CPU?
As far as i know, you should never have a difference between core and cache undervolting, they should always have the same value!
ah im sorry. in my frustration i forgot to say: its a i7-9750h

What sort of stability testing did you do along the way?
i was running the TS bench testing and cinebench r20. i didnt encounter an error message in TS bench but the cpu was a bit on the slow side. about 11.900 ish.

tell ThrottleStop not to save these voltages.
okay, but so how does this work? if i dont save them, then how would it remember the voltages i put in? i assume it just saves the voltages for throttlestop to test, and doesnt apply it to the whole machine then? like a simulation?

Tried clearing the CMOS?
not exactly since im not sure what that is. i'll research it now for future use. thanks for the suggestion
 

unclewebb

RealTemp Author
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
1,921 (0.43/day)
i was running the TS bench testing and cinebench r20
But were you doing any 1 or 2 Thread TS Bench testing? Light load testing is just as important or even more important than full load testing. Use the default turbo ratios so your CPU can use the highest multiplier during these tests.

if i dont save them, then how would it remember the voltages i put in?
When using the Do not save voltages option, ThrottleStop will not remember the voltages that you have set. That is the whole point. It will use the voltages that you have set but if anything goes wrong like a BSOD, those voltages will be gone and the CPU will reset itself to default voltages. When you reboot after a BSOD, ThrottleStop will not remember or use the voltages that just caused a BSOD.

When testing out voltages, if you have no idea how stable your CPU is, you do not want to be saving those voltages until after some thorough testing. Write down what you are doing and what you are testing. Test away. Do not tell ThrottleStop to save any voltages until you know that those voltages are safe to use. Passing a single test does not guarantee anything. When adjusting voltages, you have to be able to pass a wide variety of tests, from light load to full load, including games or whatever is important to you.

Whenever you wake up and decide that today is the day that you want to explore CPU voltages, enable this safety feature. When playing with voltages, I would avoid using the Task Scheduler to auto start ThrottleStop. You can easily open the Task Scheduler and temporarily Disable ThrottleStop while testing. Just a few tricks to avoid BSOD loops.
 

Empecial

New Member
Joined
May 24, 2020
Messages
16 (0.35/day)
But were you doing any 1 or 2 Thread TS Bench testing?
i was only running the 12 threads TS bench testing. but i just did some, but im not sure how good these numbers are

1590866532887.png


should i also do bigger sizes? i imagine that would also help
 
Top