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Building a pc first time!!!!

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#1
Hi,i m building a pc for the first time,till now i have only decided the graphics card( msi rtx 2060 gaming z).
....so plz help me decide other components like psu,cpu,cases,etc...thanks!!!!
 

Tatty_One

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#2
Welcome. You will need to inform the community of some more details, lets start with budget and primary use?
 
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#3
Since you started with 2060 and not 2070 or 2080, my guess is your budget is more limited.

In this case, you can't go wrong with the other component containing 2 and 6 in the name, namely Ryzen 5 2600 (6-core CPU)
Assorted motherboard, 16 GB of DDR4-3000 and should be a very good gaming PC that runs anything in 1920x1080, even up to 144 Hz (depending on the game)

A 550W PSU of a good brand should be enough for this config, but if budget permits, go higher as you might want to upgrade in the future to more powerful components.
I recommend Fractal Design cases (personal preference). R6 is absolutely AWESOME, best looking, flexible and functional "classy" case in recent time.
 
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#4
Post a budget and what, if any, parts you already have. Also will you need to buy a copy of Windows, monitor, keyboard and mouse from your budget?
Its for gaming purpose....i have the keyboards,mouse and monitors....i have an old cpu with intel i3 5th gen and 4gb ram

Since you started with 2060 and not 2070 or 2080, my guess is your budget is more limited.

In this case, you can't go wrong with the other component containing 2 and 6 in the name, namely Ryzen 5 2600 (6-core CPU)
Assorted motherboard, 16 GB of DDR4-3000 and should be a very good gaming PC that runs anything in 1920x1080, even up to 144 Hz (depending on the game)

A 550W PSU of a good brand should be enough for this config, but if budget permits, go higher as you might want to upgrade in the future to more powerful components.
I recommend Fractal Design cases (personal preference). R6 is absolutely AWESOME, best looking, flexible and functional "classy" case in recent time.
Thanks...is the case a good ventilated one..and yeah i m budget limited:(
 
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#5
Thanks...is the case a good ventilated one..and yeah i m budget limited:(
I gave you some options to start with ;)

You know the saying "Google it !".
Find out if you like them and anything you can about the products. Then you'll be more informed and form an opinion if that's what you want or not.

For example, when already having an idea of a CPU, then you can know what kind of motherboard to search for (Socket AM4). Look at the specs, compare products, see if you like it physically (assuming you want to build a new computer using the glass side of the case, especially since that CPU comes bundled with an RGB cooler)

After you've done your homework, come back with the results here so people can tell you if your conclusions are okay or not really.
Enjoy !
 
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#7
He said he already has the monitor from the old computer... so 60Hz for sure.

(Unless buying a new monitor as well, which I don't see anywhere in this topic).
 
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#8
He said he already has the monitor from the old computer... so 60Hz for sure.

(Unless buying a new monitor as well, which I don't see anywhere in this topic).
and he said gaming
are high refresh monitors really that much of a new fad?
 
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#9
I gave you some options to start with ;)

You know the saying "Google it !".
Find out if you like them and anything you can about the products. Then you'll be more informed and form an opinion if that's what you want or not.

For example, when already having an idea of a CPU, then you can know what kind of motherboard to search for (Socket AM4). Look at the specs, compare products, see if you like it physically (assuming you want to build a new computer using the glass side of the case, especially since that CPU comes bundled with an RGB cooler)

After you've done your homework, come back with the results here so people can tell you if your conclusions are okay or not really.
Enjoy !
Cpu:amd ryzen 5 2600x
Gpu:msi rtx 2060 gaming z
Mobo:msi x470 gaming plus
Ram:G.skill trident Z rgb 16gb 3000mhz
SDD:Crucial Mx500 500gb
Till now those are the components i liked....can't decide on a case and psu...any suggestions for the remaining two and the ones mentioned above!!!
 
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#10
Welcome. You will need to inform the community of some more details, lets start with budget and primary use?
We should have a sticky detailing the minimum requirements for a builder's topic start with exactly those points, IMO. Even if just so members have a simple list to copy/paste in response whenever its missing.

Cpu:amd ryzen 5 2600x
Gpu:msi rtx 2060 gaming z
Mobo:msi x470 gaming plus
Ram:G.skill trident Z rgb 16gb 3000mhz
SDD:Crucial Mx500 500gb
Till now those are the components i liked....can't decide on a case and psu...any suggestions for the remaining two and the ones mentioned above!!!
Looks decent! You can consider the following things for a case, to figure out what suits you:

I'm partial to the awesome filter and search functions you find here: Its Dutch, but you'll manage I think
https://tweakers.net/categorie/61/behuizingen/producten/

First look at your wishlist;
- Windowed or not. A window does nothing in terms of silence or cooling, just looks. It also tends to add a small price premium.
- Storage. Will you be using more than 3 SSDs or 2 HDDs? Then some more compact ATX cases are not an option. If not, there are some nice ones; my case; Fractal Design Define C, is an example, and there are many similar ones. They are shorter and don't have a big HDD cage in the front. I mount my SSDs behind the motherboard.
- USB ports, USB C, 3.0/3.1. Check your peripherals and stuff you like to connect now or in the future. Many cases have only 2 USB front ports. Others have 4 or more.
- Cooling. Recent trend is closing up the front panel, leaving your rig out of fresh air intake. Avoid.
- Silence. Some cases have sound dampening panels. It makes a real difference.

Here's the Fractal Define C TG with parts in it... its pretty cute, the short ATX dimensions.

IMG_20180119_193119276.jpg


My personal favorite brands are Fractal Design and Phanteks. Good quality throughout the whole range, not the cheapest, but will last you multiple builds so they are worth it.

PSU: Use the same website: https://tweakers.net/categorie/664/voedingen/producten/
Corsair RM, EVGA G series, any Seasonic are good options. Getting some headroom (like 150-200w) isn't a bad thing, you'll be hearing the PSU less under load that way and the price difference isn't always that big. Also, if you upgrade to higher TDP parts, you can keep the PSU.
 
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Tatty_One

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#11
We should have a sticky detailing the minimum requirements for a builder's topic start with exactly those points, IMO. Even if just so members have a simple list to copy/paste in response whenever its missing.
Done...… sort of :D
 
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#12
Done...… sort of :D
Heh! Nice. I might hit you up on PM with my version at some point, got a pretty neat source that just needs translating. But like you, I'm lazy right about now ;)
 
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#13
Cpu:amd ryzen 5 2600x
Gpu:msi rtx 2060 gaming z
Mobo:msi x470 gaming plus
Ram:G.skill trident Z rgb 16gb 3000mhz
SDD:Crucial Mx500 500gb
Till now those are the components i liked....can't decide on a case and psu...any suggestions for the remaining two and the ones mentioned above!!!
2 things.
1. make your that memory is on the motherboards QVL. Ryzen performs better with fast memory.
2. you can go with a 240gb SSD and use your old hard drives for heavy storage and even store games that are played only once in a while. On the other hand, if you have the budget for it, go with a 1tb SSD instead of 500gb.
 
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#14
Hi,i m building a pc for the first time,till now i have only decided the graphics card( msi rtx 2060 gaming z).
....so plz help me decide other components like psu,cpu,cases,etc...thanks!!!!
I own one of those cards and you will be very happy with it. It's great.
I built it with a ryzen7 1700x@ 3800mhz, 16gb of gskill tridentZ RGB 3000mhz ram that I bumped up to 3200mhz and an msi b450 tomahawk motherboard.
The combo makes for an excellent looking and performing gaming system. My son loves it.

Case is a coolermaster MB530P.
 

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#15
Cpu:amd ryzen 5 2600x
Gpu:msi rtx 2060 gaming z
Mobo:msi x470 gaming plus
Ram:G.skill trident Z rgb 16gb 3000mhz
SDD:Crucial Mx500 500gb
Till now those are the components i liked....can't decide on a case and psu...any suggestions for the remaining two and the ones mentioned above!!!
If you're tight on your budget you can get a B450 motherboard - MSI B450 Tomahawk has very decent VRM for its price and is a bit cheaper than the X470 you have there.

Case:
- Fractal Design Meshify C
- NZXT H500
Lots depends on your individual looks/airflow/noise preferences.

PSU:
- Seasonic EVO 620W Bronze+
- anything else in your budget that's actually OEM'd by Seasonic (someone else might have better input on this, I haven't really researched the subject for my next build properly)
Don't cheapen out on your PSU, get something decent. I'm running my XFX PSU that's made by Seasonic for 6 years now without any issues.
 
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#16
Seasonic EVO 620W Bronze+
As good as Seasonic is, it might be best for OP to look for a decent Gold rated PSU as a minimum.

@Lucifer1001 do you have a monetary figure for your budget? It would better help the community help you in suggesting parts
 
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#17
The main thing here will be deciding on CPU Platform. Fir that I would suggest reading the summaries for the two most popular options here:

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/Ryzen_5_2600/20.html

Cons (Ryzen 2600)
  • Gaming performance lower than competing Intel Core i5 chips
  • Limited overclocking potential
  • Memory still a bit more problematic than on Intel
  • Lacks integrated graphics
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/Ryzen_7_2700X/21.html

Cons 2700X

  • Single-threaded performance still lower than Intel's
  • Limited overclocking potential
  • Memory still a bit more problematic than on Intel
  • Lacks integrated graphics
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/

Cons (9600k)
  • Expensive, made worse by high DIY retail channel pricing
  • Lacks HyperThreading
  • No cooler included, unlike competition
The Core i5-9600K should bring a smile to the faces of PC gamers. It's a fantastic way to offset the cost of NVIDIA's latest GeForce RTX graphics cards, which are relatively pricey, by choosing this processor over the pricier Core i7-9700K, or even the i9-9900K, but more on that later. Intel is right in its calculation that the Ryzen 5 2600X can be tackled by moderately increasing clock speeds over the i5-8600K without tinkering with the core configuration. The new i5-9600K is consistently faster than the 2600X at gaming, in all resolutions, and stays ahead of it in all single-threaded and most multi-threaded CPU tests.

When it comes to gaming, the i5-9600K is a "look no further" option for those who mainly game on their PC and don't use the same machine for making money (i.e., productivity that can leverage high multi-threaded processors). Across all our game resolutions, the i5-9600K stays ahead of all AMD processors in our bench, and more importantly, performs within 1–2% of the significantly pricier Core i7-9700K. ,,, Overclocking the Core i5-9600K is easy because of its unlocked base-clock multiplier, and we managed an all-core manual overclock of 4.80 GHz, which is a massive 29% overclock compared to the nominal 3.70 GHz clock speed of this processor, although just 200 MHz faster than the maximum Turbo Boost frequency of 4.60 GHz.

Who should buy the Core i5-9600K? You should if you use your machine to play games and your non-gaming activity is restricted to Office, image editing, web browsing, or even game streaming. The AMD Ryzen 5 2600X doesn't have an edge over this chip in any of those machine roles. If you are an amateur content creator who needs the added CPU muscle for video editing or some other multi-threaded workload, you could spend $20 more on a Ryzen 7 2700 for two more cores and many more threads. The Ryzen 7 2700X continues to offer good value for multi-threaded CPU workloads even though in the end, it's bested by the i7-9700K, the most exciting processor to buy in our opinion. The i9-9900K is great if money isn't tight and you want a turnkey solution that's equally good at gaming and productivity. If your main focus is productivity, with highly-threaded apps slowing down your money-making process, you could explore HEDT options such as the Threadripper 2920X. The best gaming CPU from Intel continues to be the humble Core i5. A more budget-oriented option is without a doubt the AMD Ryzen 2600, which offers 47% better price/performance than the 9600K while being "close enough" in most games, saving you over $100 in the process—and it comes with a heatsink, too.
Now the reason I gave ya much more quoting in the 2nd one (you should read all linked pages in full) is that when the 2600 was done, the 9600k did not exist; the later article provides some comparisons between the 9600k and various Ryzen options.. The "base build" that we offer has a 9600k which we adjust depending on user's budget. That may mean dropping down to a 2600 or going up f more moola available. Few more considerations in this regard:

1. I agree with the author above "Who should buy the 9600k ? You should if you use your machine to play games and your non-gaming activity is restricted to Office, image editing, web browsing, or even game streaming". I would add AutoCAD and just about everything else except content creation, video editing animation and rendering. If you do those things ... and do them on a regular basis, I'd get the 2700x.

2. Avoid the "false equivalency" dilemma. When you are envisioning say whether to get a 2060 or a 2070, comparing the relative performance of the two cards with the cost of the two cards is a false equivalency. The 2070 makes the entire build faster. The performance difference between the cards is 17%; the cost difference between the cards is 43% ... so is that a bad deal ? 43% more for 17% more ? No answer because its is a false equivalency. Assuming the rest of your system cost $1,000 ... that means the 2060 system costs $1350 and the 2070 system costs $1500... that's a 17% increase in performance for a 11% increase in system cost.... or what I would call the "proverbial no brainer" ... assuming of course that the $150 is attainable.

3. When deciding on MoBos, there are three basic classes ... a) enthusiast level boards ($275 - $500 that I would say are not in consideration here b) gaming oriented boards that allow overclocking and "gaming enthusiast level" LAN (Intel I219-V) and sound (ALC 1220) subsystems ($150 - $250) and c) budget boards with neither OC ability or those gaming oriented subsystems. There are a few boards that lie in between b and c that give you the decent sound / LAN systems, but to get them you are spending maybe $10 less than the same board which does overclocking. In short, I'd go with a Z series board .... X series with AMD based build.

4. Last I looked, sweet spot (balancing cost and performance) was 2 x 8 GB DDR4-3000 CAS 15 or DDR4-3200 CAS 16.

5. With a 2060, a 500 watt PSI is fine, 500 recommended. If budget stretched the S12 II / M12 520 II or 620 watters (avoid III series) are great and very inexpensive. Seasonic Focus Gold + is ridiculously low priced for the quality. But with the 850 watter at the same price as the 500, grab it for $89 (Assuming you in US).

So again. looking at your 2060, choice... I'm guessing you have a budget of $1500 or so.... with that, this is what I'd propose.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($264.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Scythe - FUMA Rev.B 79 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($184.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate - FireCuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg Business)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Z Video Card ($389.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks - ENTHOO EVOLV X GLASS (Silver) ATX Mid Tower Case ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1492.70
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-20 20:41 EDT-0400


OK, so I guessed wrong ... what can we do ? ..... BTW, that MoBo has ALC 1220 and Intel I219-V and good OC ability

$1500 budget is Low - If I'm low, the only thing I'd change is the GFX card. Let's do the math with the 2070 / 2080

a) Upping to the MSI 2070 Gaming adds $160. So for a 16.7% increase in performance .... we have to pay an 10.7 % increase in price. That's a solid ROI if the money is there.
Upping to the MSI 2080 Gaming adds $411. So for a 40.6% increase in performance .... we have to pay an 27.5 % increase in price. Again, that's also a solid ROI if the money is there.

b) As for the cooler, that $50 cooler outperforms the $90 flagship models from Noctua, Cryorig and Phanteks. It also outperforms almost every CLC type 2 x 120 cooler made and is certainly much quieter than those that ain't. If you must have water cooling, I'd suggest the Swiftceh H240 X3 of H320 X3. It's expandable (can add MoBo and GFX card blocks) pups 10x stronger than typical CLCs and no aluminum componentry.

c) If budget allows more and bigger storage.

$1500 Budget is High -

a) Case - If you look at the reviews the Evolv X is widely considered the "best way to spend $199" .... if money needs to be cut. The Model 600S is made to be extra quiet and is about $65 cheaper.

b) PSU - Can save about $30 with a Seasonic S12 620 watter ... the the "metal rating" has zilch to do w/ quality and just refers to how much you spend on electricity. At USA average electricty prices, the difference between Gold and Bronze amounts to about $4.50 per year .... doesn't seem worth it to me., I'd stick with the 850 Gold for its 10 year warranty and the fact that it will run at max efficiency most of the time (50% load)

c) Storage - you could save with a HD instead of a SSHD but a comparable HD to the FireCUDA SSHD would be a WD Black and the SSHD is 54% faster (Same warranty, same RMA rate) and the Black is $50 more money than the SSHD for same capacity.

d) Next we have the AMD platform options. I'll look at the 2600 and the 2700x

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/13.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/14.html

Dunno your resolution so I'll list 1080p, 1440p and average.

2700x = 94.5% (1080p) / 97.2% (1440p) ~ 95.85 %
2600 = 93.1% (1080p) / 95.8% (1440p) - 94.45%

Note: With all CPUs overclocked, Intel picks up about 0.8% .... The 2700x actually drops in gaming performance when OC'd, the effect on the 2600 is not significant in gaming but can be significant in multithreaded apps.

d.1 2700x - because the review said "The Ryzen 7 2700X continues to offer good value for multi-threaded CPU workloads even though in the end, it's bested by the i7-9700K, the most exciting processor to buy in our opinion."

Switching to the 2700X and the MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon (Same ALC 1220 but Intel i211AT LAN subsystem) saves ya about $18... other than Intel / AMD thing, Scythe is a better cooler but I can't speak to the LAN susbsystem difference as not familiar with the latter.

d.2 2600 - using the 2600 with the same MoBo as above drops the price to $1350.77 for a savings of $116, using the 2600 with the same MoBo as above drops the price to $1287.62 for a savings of $205. Note here that pcpartpicker still says that you may have a BIOS issue here. You will need to confirm that the BIOS you are getting is compatible.

Again, you could go with the cheaper series boards from both Intel and AMD but as was said above, the lower capability MoBos also leave you with substandard LAN and Audio subsystems which, to my eyes are not worth the cost savings. You could go cheaper on both Intel and AMD sides but, your making the same sacrifices each way. That's why I used two MoBos from the same MSI series as a basis for comparison. So... where does that leave us ...

If i didn't copy anything wrong ...

- The 2700X / MSI X470 build costs 98.8% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 94.5% (1080p) to 95.85% (1440p)of the performance. Edge Intel
- The 2600 / MSI X470 build costs 92.2% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 93.1% (1080p) to 94.45% (1440p) of the performance. Edge: Insignificant
- The 2600 / MSI X370 build costs 86.2% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 93.1% (1080p) to 94.45% (1440p) of the performance. Edge: AMD

So ... from a value / ROI standpoint ... while the 2700x doesn't seem like a wise option for a gaming box, the 2600 does provided you address the BIOS issue.... but again, we are still missing some information. The Ryzen options do not have an iGPU ...so if you use one monitor for gaming and want to have an iGPU for a 2nd monitor to display web sites, monitoring apps, frame counters, chat apps, etc, then that may add value to the Intel option.

In summary, not knowing all that much about your usage and resolution ....

a) Your budget is somewhat flexible around $1500 and will use your box for gaming primarily but you also spend > 40% of my time using rendering, animation, video editing or other workstation apps that actually do benefit from the extra cores. No need for better cooling as won't be OC'ing CPU. => Ryzen 2700x / X470 build recommended.

b) Your budget is somewhat flexible aroind $1500 and will use your box primarily for gaming and normal consumer apps and only rarely for workstation apps. You will either from the getgo or perhaps maybe later, overclock the CPU and GPU or you like the idea of having iGPU for 2nd monitor. You want a top of the line cooler for overclockinmg whiuch you need anywayas CPU doesn't come with one. => Intel / Z390 build recommended.

c) Your budget is tight, would like to be < $1300 and your box will be used primarily for gaming / normal consumer apps and only rarely for workstation apps. You will overclock the GPU but prolly not bother with the CPU due to the minimal gains to be expected. You won't be using a 2nd monitor now or within the reasonable life of this PC. => Ryzen 2600 / X370 build recommended if BIOS or nor iGPU thing doesn't present an issue.

Of course another thing to be considered if you have a budget of $1500, if ya can stretch it a teeny bit, you can have a MSI 2070 Gaming card with the Ryzen 2600. If it were me, I'd do the 9600k build with a MSI 2070 Gaming for $1,650 or 2080 for $1900. However, I expect the 2080 will be significanty cheaper come May ... likely around $650... lower if the tariffs disappear and would buy at that time.
 
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#18
Now the reason I gave ya much more quoting in the 2nd one (you should read all linked pages in full) is that when the 2600 was done, the 9600k did not exist;
And by that reasoning alone the initial tests done on the 2600 and 2600X are no longer valid, nor are the summaries presented.
Memory compatability alone has improved greatly on the AMD chips.
I suggest basing a build on what you do most and budget. Don't fall in to the Intel is better because it costs more trap, most people won't notice if one CPU is slightly faster than another, the same goes for FPS.
 
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#19
.... and he clearly stated he's on a budget (which usually means - lowest amount of money for a given performance). In this case... recommending Intel platform is simply not worth it. And also no future-proofing whatsoever.

In 2 years time he can just plug in those future 16-core on AM4 Zen 2/Valhalla chips and BAM instant doubling-tripling of horsepower. With Intel platform what can he do ? Replace everything.
 
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#20
The main thing here will be deciding on CPU Platform. Fir that I would suggest reading the summaries for the two most popular options here:

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/Ryzen_5_2600/20.html

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/Ryzen_7_2700X/21.html

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/



Now the reason I gave ya much more quoting in the 2nd one (you should read all linked pages in full) is that when the 2600 was done, the 9600k did not exist; the later article provides some comparisons between the 9600k and various Ryzen options.. The "base build" that we offer has a 9600k which we adjust depending on user's budget. That may mean dropping down to a 2600 or going up f more moola available. Few more considerations in this regard:

1. I agree with the author above "Who should buy the 9600k ? You should if you use your machine to play games and your non-gaming activity is restricted to Office, image editing, web browsing, or even game streaming". I would add AutoCAD and just about everything else except content creation, video editing animation and rendering. If you do those things ... and do them on a regular basis, I'd get the 2700x.

2. Avoid the "false equivalency" dilemma. When you are envisioning say whether to get a 2060 or a 2070, comparing the relative performance of the two cards with the cost of the two cards is a false equivalency. The 2070 makes the entire build faster. The performance difference between the cards is 17%; the cost difference between the cards is 43% ... so is that a bad deal ? 43% more for 17% more ? No answer because its is a false equivalency. Assuming the rest of your system cost $1,000 ... that means the 2060 system costs $1350 and the 2070 system costs $1500... that's a 17% increase in performance for a 11% increase in system cost.... or what I would call the "proverbial no brainer" ... assuming of course that the $150 is attainable.

3. When deciding on MoBos, there are three basic classes ... a) enthusiast level boards ($275 - $500 that I would say are not in consideration here b) gaming oriented boards that allow overclocking and "gaming enthusiast level" LAN (Intel I219-V) and sound (ALC 1220) subsystems ($150 - $250) and c) budget boards with neither OC ability or those gaming oriented subsystems. There are a few boards that lie in between b and c that give you the decent sound / LAN systems, but to get them you are spending maybe $10 less than the same board which does overclocking. In short, I'd go with a Z series board .... X series with AMD based build.

4. Last I looked, sweet spot (balancing cost and performance) was 2 x 8 GB DDR4-3000 CAS 15 or DDR4-3200 CAS 16.

5. With a 2060, a 500 watt PSI is fine, 500 recommended. If budget stretched the S12 II / M12 520 II or 620 watters (avoid III series) are great and very inexpensive. Seasonic Focus Gold + is ridiculously low priced for the quality. But with the 850 watter at the same price as the 500, grab it for $89 (Assuming you in US).

So again. looking at your 2060, choice... I'm guessing you have a budget of $1500 or so.... with that, this is what I'd propose.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor ($264.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Scythe - FUMA Rev.B 79 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($184.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($104.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate - FireCuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg Business)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Z Video Card ($389.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks - ENTHOO EVOLV X GLASS (Silver) ATX Mid Tower Case ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1492.70
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-20 20:41 EDT-0400


OK, so I guessed wrong ... what can we do ? ..... BTW, that MoBo has ALC 1220 and Intel I219-V and good OC ability

$1500 budget is Low - If I'm low, the only thing I'd change is the GFX card. Let's do the math with the 2070 / 2080

a) Upping to the MSI 2070 Gaming adds $160. So for a 16.7% increase in performance .... we have to pay an 10.7 % increase in price. That's a solid ROI if the money is there.
Upping to the MSI 2080 Gaming adds $411. So for a 40.6% increase in performance .... we have to pay an 27.5 % increase in price. Again, that's also a solid ROI if the money is there.

b) As for the cooler, that $50 cooler outperforms the $90 flagship models from Noctua, Cryorig and Phanteks. It also outperforms almost every CLC type 2 x 120 cooler made and is certainly much quieter than those that ain't. If you must have water cooling, I'd suggest the Swiftceh H240 X3 of H320 X3. It's expandable (can add MoBo and GFX card blocks) pups 10x stronger than typical CLCs and no aluminum componentry.

c) If budget allows more and bigger storage.

$1500 Budget is High -

a) Case - If you look at the reviews the Evolv X is widely considered the "best way to spend $199" .... if money needs to be cut. The Model 600S is made to be extra quiet and is about $65 cheaper.

b) PSU - Can save about $30 with a Seasonic S12 620 watter ... the the "metal rating" has zilch to do w/ quality and just refers to how much you spend on electricity. At USA average electricty prices, the difference between Gold and Bronze amounts to about $4.50 per year .... doesn't seem worth it to me., I'd stick with the 850 Gold for its 10 year warranty and the fact that it will run at max efficiency most of the time (50% load)

c) Storage - you could save with a HD instead of a SSHD but a comparable HD to the FireCUDA SSHD would be a WD Black and the SSHD is 54% faster (Same warranty, same RMA rate) and the Black is $50 more money than the SSHD for same capacity.

d) Next we have the AMD platform options. I'll look at the 2600 and the 2700x

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/13.html
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i5_9600K/14.html

Dunno your resolution so I'll list 1080p, 1440p and average.

2700x = 94.5% (1080p) / 97.2% (1440p) ~ 95.85 %
2600 = 93.1% (1080p) / 95.8% (1440p) - 94.45%

Note: With all CPUs overclocked, Intel picks up about 0.8% .... The 2700x actually drops in gaming performance when OC'd, the effect on the 2600 is not significant in gaming but can be significant in multithreaded apps.

d.1 2700x - because the review said "The Ryzen 7 2700X continues to offer good value for multi-threaded CPU workloads even though in the end, it's bested by the i7-9700K, the most exciting processor to buy in our opinion."

Switching to the 2700X and the MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon (Same ALC 1220 but Intel i211AT LAN subsystem) saves ya about $18... other than Intel / AMD thing, Scythe is a better cooler but I can't speak to the LAN susbsystem difference as not familiar with the latter.

d.2 2600 - using the 2600 with the same MoBo as above drops the price to $1350.77 for a savings of $116, using the 2600 with the same MoBo as above drops the price to $1287.62 for a savings of $205. Note here that pcpartpicker still says that you may have a BIOS issue here. You will need to confirm that the BIOS you are getting is compatible.

Again, you could go with the cheaper series boards from both Intel and AMD but as was said above, the lower capability MoBos also leave you with substandard LAN and Audio subsystems which, to my eyes are not worth the cost savings. You could go cheaper on both Intel and AMD sides but, your making the same sacrifices each way. That's why I used two MoBos from the same MSI series as a basis for comparison. So... where does that leave us ...

If i didn't copy anything wrong ...

- The 2700X / MSI X470 build costs 98.8% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 94.5% (1080p) to 95.85% (1440p)of the performance. Edge Intel
- The 2600 / MSI X470 build costs 92.2% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 93.1% (1080p) to 94.45% (1440p) of the performance. Edge: Insignificant
- The 2600 / MSI X370 build costs 86.2% of the Intel / 9600k build and, according to TPU testing overall in gaming provides 93.1% (1080p) to 94.45% (1440p) of the performance. Edge: AMD

So ... from a value / ROI standpoint ... while the 2700x doesn't seem like a wise option for a gaming box, the 2600 does provided you address the BIOS issue.... but again, we are still missing some information. The Ryzen options do not have an iGPU ...so if you use one monitor for gaming and want to have an iGPU for a 2nd monitor to display web sites, monitoring apps, frame counters, chat apps, etc, then that may add value to the Intel option.

In summary, not knowing all that much about your usage and resolution ....

a) Your budget is somewhat flexible around $1500 and will use your box for gaming primarily but you also spend > 40% of my time using rendering, animation, video editing or other workstation apps that actually do benefit from the extra cores. No need for better cooling as won't be OC'ing CPU. => Ryzen 2700x / X470 build recommended.

b) Your budget is somewhat flexible aroind $1500 and will use your box primarily for gaming and normal consumer apps and only rarely for workstation apps. You will either from the getgo or perhaps maybe later, overclock the CPU and GPU or you like the idea of having iGPU for 2nd monitor. You want a top of the line cooler for overclockinmg whiuch you need anywayas CPU doesn't come with one. => Intel / Z390 build recommended.

c) Your budget is tight, would like to be < $1300 and your box will be used primarily for gaming / normal consumer apps and only rarely for workstation apps. You will overclock the GPU but prolly not bother with the CPU due to the minimal gains to be expected. You won't be using a 2nd monitor now or within the reasonable life of this PC. => Ryzen 2600 / X370 build recommended if BIOS or nor iGPU thing doesn't present an issue.

Of course another thing to be considered if you have a budget of $1500, if ya can stretch it a teeny bit, you can have a MSI 2070 Gaming card with the Ryzen 2600. If it were me, I'd do the 9600k build with a MSI 2070 Gaming for $1,650 or 2080 for $1900. However, I expect the 2080 will be significanty cheaper come May ... likely around $650... lower if the tariffs disappear and would buy at that time.
You're forgetting the inflated cost of Z390 as a platform. 184 dollars on thát board... painful. And then to use that investment only for a 6c/6t midrange CPU... wasteful. Much better off sticking to Z370 which is cheaper and offers the same CPUs at lower price, or allows you to slot in a 6c12t 8700K instead. That is, if it must be Intel. Which really, we have no real reason to recommend... If OP is not high refresh rate gaming, its pointless anyway and Ryzen is hands down the better and cheaper route. The cold math 'ROI' doesn't work. There is no ROI here, its hardware and it will only drop in value. What works is a build that suits a use case at the lowest possible price.
 
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#21
This is my build:
Cpu:amd ryzen 5 2600x
Gpu:msi rtx 2060 gaming z
Psu:corsair rmx650 650w full modular
Mobo:msi x470 gaming plus
Ram:corsair vengeance Lpx 16gb 3000mhz
Case:corsair carbide series spec-alpha
Ssd:WD green 240gb sata 3 2.5
Still open to suggestions!!!!:D
 
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#22
50% of the front intake on that Corsair case is covered by plastic...
 
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#24
The case you picked will be fine if it's the one you want. It will have adequate airflow to keep your components cooled.
 
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#25
Do you have any better option??
Somebody above suggested Fractal Design Meshify C, and I tend to stand by that option.

It's a good looking case with great airflow, the entire front side is open (and filtered as well), the entire top side is open, the PSU part is well ventilated as well no matter which orientation you place it.

Little great case for a powerful modern gaming PC.

Review here
https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Fractal_Design/Meshify_C/
The minuses are that this case isn't exactly designed for watercooling (it's kinda small), but I guess you don't care about that.

Add 2x 140mm fans and you're set, game away for hours without care.


~~~
p.s. - I looked at that case:
https://www.corsair.com/us/en/specalpha

GAWD, the ugliness... people really need to grow out of these "gamery" cases.
I admit, I bought a similar ugly angled case with strong accents and stuff... many years ago. MANY. YEARS. AGO. Not today.
 
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